ANSWERS: 5
  • No...for the same reason that newborns are - probably - not theists, nor atheists, nor agnostics. *** You have to have learned or imagined for yourself the concept of "deity" and formed an opinion on the existence of deity before you can be any of those things. *** Now: I could be wrong. It might be that, even without having been taught the concept of deity, I might have conceived such a thing by myself. But I suspect not since it is in some ways a somewhat advanced concept. I may be a little inventive with practical things, but with philosophical things? Naw. That isn't me. Similarly: I probably would have never invented "I think, therefore I am" or "all that exists must have an origin", or even something as fundamental (in philosophy) as a hypothetical "First Cause". etc. My inventiveness, I think, simply does not run in that direction.
    • bostjan64
      How would your religious life played out differently, had you say, been born in Pakistan, and been indoctrinated with Islam as a child, and likely heard about Christianity first through that teaching?
    • www.bible-reviews.com
      Impossible to say. I've hardly been a devout lifelong Christian! But I *imagine* that if I knew the same things that I now do, I would question Qur'an because - well - it's just not best evidence. For very nearly everything mentioned in the Bible, the Bible is best evidence. In very nearly every other case, the best evidence agrees with the Bible! This is *definitely* not the case with Qur'an, which contradicts "best evidence" in dozens of ways.
    • bostjan64
      I tend to think it all depends on the context of the passage you are considering. What passages in the Quran are contradictory?
    • www.bible-reviews.com
      ? Not simply "contradictory", but - more precisely - contradictory to best available evidence. For starters: all of the passages that contradict the Bible! For most of these events, the Bible documents are centuries older than Qur'an, centuries closer to the events described, and authored by the people of the society in which those events (presumably) occurred. Consider Solomon, for example. Qur'an contradicts many of the Bible claims about Solomon...yet Qur'an was authored about 1,600 years after the time of Solomon, and at the VERY least 1,000 years after the Biblical documents describing Solomon were authored by people of Solomon's own nation and language. What is best evidence concerning the acts of Solomon? Qur'an? Clearly not. And likewise Lot, Moses, Abraham, Isaac, Ishmael, Jesus, etc. etc.
    • bostjan64
      Which details does the Quran have about Solomon that are contradicted by the Bible? I know there's a lot in both scriptures about him, but what, specifically doesn't jibe?
    • www.bible-reviews.com
      Well, for one thing - Solomon's sin. In the Bible, Solomon worshiped the false gods of his foreign wives and died in his sin. In Qur'an, Solomon declared that he loved wealth more than God, but then had a change of heart and turned back to God. In Qur'an Solomon also temporarily lost control of Jerusalem to a foreign conqueror. The Bible records something similar happening to King David...but not to Solomon. In Qur'an, Solomon can speak the language of animals and birds and has an army of djinn and of birds. Again: nothing of the sort is described in the Bible. And so on. (The Qur'anic story of the Queen of Sheba is particularly fantastic...and very unlike the story of that same Queen that is found in the Bible.)
    • bostjan64
      Does the Bible say Solomon was without sin? I'd like to see the passage, since I certainly don't recall anything like that. The Bible depicts Solomon as very wealthy, even greedy and lavish, which is certainly in line with the Quran's account. I Kings 10:13 tells of Solomon and the Queen of Sheba, so, it's clearly not a contradiction between the two sources. If one account sounds rather fantastic, I'd urge you to consider that much of the Bible sounds rather fantastic to people who haven't read it before. If you have a problem with certain details being left out of the Quran or left out of the Bible of the same stories, I don't know what to tell you, but that's not the same as contradiction. You'd probably make a good cop, though, nailing people for leaving out unimportant details of their story and adding them in later. Heh.
    • www.bible-reviews.com
      To the contrary: the Bible describes Solomon's sin. It does NOT describe him as greedy. Certainly the Biblical account of the Queen of Sheba contradicts that of Qur'an. Read them both and see for yourself. (Hint: just because two books mention the same person does not mean that the two stories about that person are not contradictory.)
    • bostjan64
      2 Chronicles 2, 2 Chronicles 8, 1 Kings 12 all discuss Solomon's overtaxation and forced labour for public projects that benefitted him. So, I don't know what you are on about. What, specifically, in the Quran contradicts the story about the queen of Sheeba? I just see two stories that focus on different details. But I don't think I'm just missing something, because scholars who spend a lot more time and actually get paid to talk about this stuff agree that the stories in the Bible and the Quran are similar: http://9herb.jp/pdf/English/Queen%20of%20Sheba.pdf , so again, I don't know what you are saying in this instance either.
  • the Aboriginals were here for 60 thousand years why did they not know of god until whiteman told them about this god?
    • bostjan64
      But they knew of Io Matua Kore, no?
    • 11stevo73
      Australian Aboriginals. no
  • I would. Just like Moses before he came to know God, he was hopeless and at a breaking point when he was forced into exile from Egypt. Without hope, life doesn't seem to make sense or even when it seems void of any meaning at all. So there has to be something that can help us know our purpose again.
  • No. You can't believe in something that you are unaware of. On that note, I might add that almost every culture believes in a higher being of some kind. The laws that regulate behavior in these cultures are based on those handed down by this higher deity and go back to the garden of Eden.
  • Same reason the idea exists in the first place, everything has an origin.As I understand it was the Mesopotamians who first wrote about another race coming to their planet, that had magical abilities, so something happened to those people for them stories to exist, civilization sprung up in this area, prior to that we were hunter gatherers, and in the Bible you have Cain the farmer, and Abel the shepherd, you have Cain leaving to build the first city. His offspring were blacksmiths, craftsman, etc, same as the Mesopotamian story which states the gods brought Me's to their land, ie kingship, priesthood, swordsmanship, farming, make-up etc. The Ethopian Bibles still have the stories of the fallen angels coming to earth and giving mankind much the same thing, this is merely hinted at in the Bible. Even to this day the Lucis trust believes that Lucifer was the saviour of mankind and fell to save them from the demiurge, this is sponsored by the United Nations. John Dee had a scrying ball with Lucifer on it, and to this day with the likes of Madam Blavatsky, Alice Bailey, Aliester(Edward) Crowley have influenced today's society, the gnostics believed Lucifer to be androgenous along with Adam, and they believe in Solve and congradula, the mixing if opposites, hence transgenderism, non binary all this stuff we see happening in society is to strip away Christianity, The secret doctrine by Madam Blavatsky which was said to influence Hitler. Alan Watts, Aldous Huxley, George Orwell, Then going back to Darwin, going back through Francis Bacon to Nietzsche, to John Dee, Plato and Socrates, it's this same alchemist mysticism.

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