ANSWERS: 37
  • Leave. Don't say a word, just leave. That way the last thing she will remember is hitting him.
  • Anyone putting thier hands on anyone period is domestic violence and should not be tolerated. Although there are times where people say things to push buttons and provoke a person to hit them because they know what buttons to push. I think he should address the fact that what he said to her was wrong, apologize about it and let her know that it is in no way ok for her to put her hands on him no matter what, if she is that damn mad then she needs to walk away.
  • Yes this is domestic violence. There are 2 solutions to this:- 1) Either be ballsy and slap her back. 2) Be smart and report to the police.
  • It is domestic violence. He should man up and try to correct the situation. I doubt that he did absolutely nothing to provoke her. It's possible, but it takes two for the argument to escalate.
  • It is, however he should be glad she was not aiming for his balls! . Making insulting comments as well could be seen as mental abuse...... . Under no circumstances should anyone raise their hands or feet to another person, and under the same circumstances a husband or wife should not use insulting words towards one another. Just my intake on the situation.
  • Yes. He should divorce her.
  • It is domestic violence. If he offended her, he should apologize but immediately file for divorce.
  • Absolutely. There shouldn't be a double standard. If a man slapped a woman in the face it would be considered domestic violence so it should be the same vice versa.
  • This is domestic violence without a doubt, just reverse the genders, husband slaps wife for saying something he deems insulting. Physical violence is never the right response to verbal abuse, she has a mouth, she could just as easily insult him back. And then the question must be asked, what else does she deem "insulting"? His socks not pulled up properly? The remote control at the wrong angle? Him talking to his mother on the phone? Him existing? This would be completely unacceptable behaviour the other way around, he should tell her to pack it in, otherwise the next time she'll get a backhander, he's got to nip it in the bud, or it'll just get worse.
  • It's definitely domestic abuse. The only reason it's not AS bad is because I don't think a man would be traumatized or physically hurt by it the way a woman would if she got slapped by a guy. It's still abuse though.
  • This is domestic violence. One person assaulting another by physical contact. First, did you deserve the smack because of something you said to her? In any event, you should call the police and make a report. your wife may be arrested, depending on the physical evidence(body marks)the officer observes. Remember this, the police can prosecute themselves for domestic violence, even though the other party does not want to prosecute. its the law. Your situation may only escalate and very serious harm can come to you or your wife. Call the police and make a report.
  • yes, this is DV. You should file a police report and have ner arrested. (just curious...what did you say?)
  • Yes, of course it's domestic violence! Just reverse the roles if you are not sure - man slaps her hard across the face. Easy, eh? Wife needs to learn how to communicate better. Man needs to explain that next time he calls police, and mean it.
  • It has been OK in our society for so long for a woman to slap a man's face if he says something she doesn't like. It has been shown in the movies for years and I even just saw it on a TV program, it's wrong. It is domestic violence. I would just leave her and never see her again. If she did it once she'll do it again. The next time I know I would punch her right in the face. If I did I could kill her having fought and learned to fight, I boxed and street fought. I know I could not stop myself from instantly defending myself, it's ingrained in me. That's why I always stayed away from confrontations as an adult. I'm sure there are many like myself and a lot of men who hit their woman were provoked and this side came out. It has happened to me and I did not hit I just left. Anybody who would push me that hard to almost be violent against them was someone who I did not want to be with, especially them knowing my past.
  • so she slapped you. I'm appalled by all this "call the cops on your wife" bullshit talk. That’s one of the problems with today's society. Maybe he didn’t mean it as an insult and the little drama queen took it as an insult. If she slaps you offer her the other cheek. If you don’t like the way she acts or is treating you, ask her to stop or leave. If you truly love her, stay by her side and seek help together. For better OR worse.
  • they both need counseling. Violence does not solve any issue in a marriage.
  • She needs to find a better way of expressing herself. He needs to be more sensitive to her feelings. Yes, this is domestic violence!
  • thats domestic nonsense! maybe he deserved the slap +3
  • Yes - the slap is domestic violence but so was the insult. Both are guilty and both need counseling before this excalates to the next level.
  • So your wife slapped you? if your going to file domestic violence charges for THAT.. if she stabbed you fine, thats serious. or if she held a gun to your head. but a slap? suck it up!
  • Yes, it is. DO file for divorce but DON'T call the police. They will arrest you.
  • Yes, it is domestic violence. He should tell her in no uncertain terms that he will not accept that type of behaviour... and mean it. People get divorced over domestic violence and it's right thing to do in my opinion.
  • That's a minor case of domestic violence. He should apologize for being insulting as he started it. +4
  • absolutely!! think about it the other way around...then it would easily be called domestic violence now wopuldnt it? But, he can be a big man and deal with it for the moment, but some sort of action should be taken if it happens again. what kind of action?...hell if I know...maybe ditch her.
  • It is classed as assault. Domestic violence (now called domestic abuse (as verbal and emotional is seen to have the same major impacts as the physical aspect) is best defined when a partner attempts to physically or psychologically dominate another. He should definately have the conversation that any physical assault is unacceptable whatever the situation. Mediation may be advisable to work through any issues. Anger and stress management courses may also be an option. The words domestic violence get banded around too frequently and applied in the wrong context. To the real victims it's no laughing matter. Remember there's no excuse for domestic abuse!
  • 1) Yes, both the insult and the slapping are domestic violence: "Domestic violence (also known as domestic abuse, spousal abuse, or intimate partner violence) occurs when a family member, partner or ex-partner attempts to physically or psychologically dominate another. Domestic violence often refers to violence between spouses, or spousal abuse but can also include cohabitants and non-married intimate partners. Domestic violence occurs in all cultures; people of all races, ethnicities, religions, sexes and classes can be perpetrators of domestic violence. Domestic violence is perpetrated by both men and women. Domestic violence has many forms, including physical violence, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, intimidation, economic deprivation, and threats of violence. Violence can be criminal and includes physical assault (hitting, pushing, shoving, etc.), sexual abuse (unwanted or forced sexual activity), and stalking. Although emotional, psychological and financial abuse are not criminal behaviors in some legal systems, they are forms of abuse and can lead to criminal violence. There are a number of dimensions including: - Mode: physical, psychological, sexual and/or social. - Frequency: on/off, occasional and chronic. - Severity: in terms of both psychological or physical harm and the need for treatment. - Transitory or permanent injury: mild, moderate, severe and up to homicide. An important component of domestic violence, often ignored is the realm of passive abuse, leading to violence. Passive abuse is covert, subtle and veiled. This includes victimization, ambiguity, neglect, spiritual and intellectual abuse." Source and further information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domestic_violence 2) "The response to domestic violence is typically a combined effort between law enforcement agencies, the courts, social service agencies and corrections/probation agencies. The role of each has evolved as domestic violence has been brought more into public view. Domestic violence historically has been viewed as a private family matter that need not involve government or criminal justice intervention.[110] Police officers were often reluctant to intervene by making an arrest, and often chose instead to simply counsel the couple and/or ask one of the parties to leave the residence for a period of time. The courts were reluctant to impose any significant sanctions on those convicted of domestic violence, largely because it was viewed as a misdemeanor offense. Activism, initiated by victim advocacy groups and feminist groups, has led to a better understanding of the scope and effect of domestic violence on victims and families, and has brought about changes in the criminal justice system's response. Several projects have aided in filling the voids in the justice system as it pertains to the protection of victims. One such initiative, The Hope Card Project, makes an attempt to remedy several problems through the issuance of an ID card to victims of abuse. The card is used to identify both parties in a domestic violence protection order and provides additional resources to the victim through a voucher program for services. "There is no photograph on a protection order, so a photograph is a bonus, not a necessity. There are several methods used to obtain the photograph. Some jurisdictions have a photograph taken of the offender during the first hearing while both parties are present. Another method is for officers to take a photograph in the field or retrieve a booking photograph from their local jail. In a lot of cases the victim brings a photograph and it is scanned. Lastly, the new online site has some state motor vehicle department photograph databases connected for that purpose. This is the ideal method." The Hope Card Project" "9 Response to domestic violence 9.1 Medical response 9.2 Longer Term Health Effects 9.3 Medication 9.4 Law enforcement 9.5 Domestic response of law enforcement today 9.6 Intervention" "Like any other call, domestic abuse lies in a gray area. Law enforcement officers have several things to consider when making a warrantless arrest: Are there signs of physical abuse? Were there witnesses? Is it recent? Was the victim assaulted by the alleged suspect? Who is the primary aggressor? Could the victim be lying? Could the suspect be lying?" Source and further information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domestic_violence 3) In the presented case, the best reaction would be deescalation. An isolated error could eventually be forgiven. And both would have to see where the causes are. Counselling could be a possibility. In extreme or repeated case, the person who feels the more in danger could leave the place and go to the police.
  • How about simply leave and move on? Why waste time and money with lawyers and the bureaucracy? You, as a man, can't handle a slap? You appear to like the drama.
  • Am I missing something here? Everyone is all get a divorce and leave her and all of this and that. My question is what did he say to her,because depending on what he said it may have be emotional abuse, I'm not saying she was right to hit him, but its not like she has beat him and left marks on him and has terrorized him. My first husband cheated on me all the time and used to say very mean things to me. I asked him if he wanted to save our marriage and if he even loved me once and his response while I was 6 months pregnant was," I only got you pregnant so you would marry me instead of going off to college and it wasn't even worth it ". I slapped the shit out of him and put him out and got a divorce and I don't regret it one bit and he used to say thing like that to me all the time crushing my self esteem and self worth and I got one good slap off of him.
  • Absolutely it's domestic violence. He should tell her to think long and hard about how she handles her anger and leave the house until she cools her jets.
  • Both of these people are being abusive. This sounds like a situation where they are in serious need of counseling before it escalates into a police action. What should he do? It depends on his goal. If he wants to save the marriage, he should walk out the door and run a mile or two, to work off the bad feelings. If he feels it is too late for that, he should call a domestic violence hot line and ask for immediate help. They will be able to give him some tips and ideas. In the meantime, scroll down to the bottom of this page, click on "How to Articles" and type "domestic violence" in the search box. You will find some excellent articles with tips and ideas on what to do next.
  • How many times has this happened? If it's only happened once or twice then I don't think you have grounds for a domestic violence case. However, if you feel unable to talk to her about it, maybe it's a sign that things are progressing toward becoming more hostile.
  • Yes, it is domestic violence. I'd give her two choices: Separate and divorce or let me slap her back hard to see how she likes it. Her choice.
  • The man does nothing. He'll seem dumb for doing sumthing about it. The man should however talk to her and let her kno wats up. And she sure as hell better make it up to him.
  • Yes. Get away quickly. When she is more calm, suggest counseling.
  • Yes, that is domestic violence. He should think about what he said, though, and ask himself if he was aggravating the situation. Seriously, though, I am trying to picture myself doing this to the person I love and I just can't picture myself doing that. There is no excuse for that behaviour. None. If you wouldn't let your child do it, you shouldn't do it, either, especially not to your spouse!
  • Yes it is. As to what he should do that would depend on what he wants to do. He can leave, try and talk with her, seek counseling, call the police. These are all options. I do not know what he said but she had all those same options instead of violence.
  • Yes I think it is. What should he do? Nothing.

Copyright 2018, Wired Ivy, LLC

Answerbag | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy