ANSWERS: 3
  • From sss.gov: "U.S. non-citizens and dual nationals are required by law to register with the Selective Service System. Most are also liable for induction into the U.S. Armed Forces if there is a draft. They would also be eligible for any deferments, postponements, and exemptions available to all other registrants. However, some aliens and dual nationals would be exempt from induction into the military if there is a draft, depending on their country of origin and other factors. Some of these exemptions are shown below: * An alien who has lived in the U.S. for less than one year is exempt from induction. * A dual national whose other country of nationality has an agreement with the U.S. which specifically provides for an exemption is exempt from induction. * [Some countries have agreements with the U.S. which exempt an alien national who is a citizen of both that country and the U.S. from military service in the U.S. Armed Forces.] An alien who requests and is exempt under an agreement or bilateral treaty can never become a U.S. citizen, and may have trouble reentering the U.S. if he leaves. * An alien who served at least a year in the military of a country with which the U.S. is involved in mutual defense activities will be exempt from military service if he is a national of a country that grants reciprocal privileges to citizens of the U.S." In other words, it looks like it if he is an American citizen or lives in America. However, since you have no son (to my knowledge), it'd be at least 18 years until this would come up. Laws might be different by then.
  • Your hypothetical son wouldn't automatically have Dual Nationality. Depending upon where he was born and raised he could either be a British Subject, an American Citizen or both. However, Dual Nationality has to be applied for.
  • My kids have an English father (me) and a norwegian mother. They have dual nationality. They will be asked to join the Norwegian army when they turn 18 as is normal in Norway. They will, however, have the option of not going on the grounds they are also English. The same is true for people who are half spanish and half english. They are called up for the spanish national service but can choose not to serve if they wish. I guess it would be the same for US and UK citizens. Best advice, speak to the local embassy and see what he says.

Copyright 2018, Wired Ivy, LLC

Answerbag | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy