ANSWERS: 7
  • It means that it's the opinion of Sam and that he has the right to have his moral high horses... It think that if you want to consider everything that is said in the Bible, Torah or Coran (whatever your flavor) then there is no way you'll get anywhere else but Hell... Back to what Sam says..; it's an invitation to be a sheep and folow the heard. Rebellion and stubborness are both dangerous to the established order... And religions love order (theirs preferably)
  • To answer your question, it's a simile comparing different categories of sins. Comparing. Not equating.
  • You should take the Bible seriously rather than literalistically, by which I mean that you figure out what the original author intended and what the original readers understood as the meaning. If they are using metaphor, as when Jesus referred to Herod as "that fox," you take it that way. If it is a simile or comparison, such as a parable, you take only the point of comparison--Jesus praised a certain dishonest manager for being prudent about his future, not about his dishonesty. When you have an entire book like Revelation that's a code book in every respect--almost nothing in it means what it says but rather refers you to someplace else in the Bible--you don't take its numbers as literal, but find out what they refer to. But when a book is written as sober history and the author obviously intended his numbers to be literal, you don't say that "a day in the sight of the Lord is like a thousand years" and change all the chronologies to whatever you feel like.
  • Pure fantasy. Sounds like something off of Lord of the Rings, I enjoyed LOTR more than the scripture.
  • Interesting thought, AntigoneRising, though I laugh when I see this verse since the word "witch" actually has it's origins in Welsh... not from Greek or Hebrew. There are a lot of bogus "interpretations" of Judeo/Christian scriptures in an attempt to conquer and control a religion or spirituality beyond their reach. Disgusting, really. Ever wonder where they get the idea of a "red devil" with a pitchfork and horns? It was an attempt to demonize one (or more)of the old deities in Western Europe. Sometimes, dogmatic fanatics try to generalize people into categories so they can explain them away. The verse you just quoted is an example of viewing the world through "colored glasses" (if one wears pink glasses, the world appears pink to them).
  • 8-18-2017 As you can see from the answers you got, it is not reliable to let people tell you what the bible means. Many people will make up stuff because they don't know what it says, and many will make up stuff because they wish it would not say what it says. You just have to read it for yourself. If you don't understand something, the first thing to do is keep reading: it will usually be explained. If that doesn't work for you, then write your question on a paper and put it in a safe place. In the fullness of time God will send understanding and then you can retire the paper. Here is a study tip: you can go to many online bible sites and search a word to see how it is used in other verses, like this: https://www.biblegateway.com/quicksearch/?quicksearch=witch&qs_version=KJV
    • RareCatch
      Excelent Aug. 18 2017
    • Jenny_Rizzo
      Many so-called interpreters do not know what they're talking about. If a blind man leads another blind man, they will both fall in a ditch. LOL
  • The Bible quote you posted to justify your claims is a double-standard. Worshiping the name Jehovah, which is a Pagan inspired name is no different than sorcerers and idolaters rebelling against God.

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