ANSWERS: 29
  • the best wood is that which is dry and plentiful.
  • Dry wood always seemed to work best.
  • Dry wood, wood found suspended in trees.
  • soft woods such as pine...but dryer is better than softer.
  • Start a fire with Cedar. It burns like crazy.
  • A mix actually, and it depends on what type of fire you need. Softwoods like pine and hemlock burn hot and fast, hardwoods burn slow but will give you long lasting embers. Also, If you need the long-lasting hardwood fire you should get it going using softwoods like the pitch-filled pine. The heat from the pine will get the hardwood going.
  • For starting a fire even in the wet is using birch bark..I have started fires with the bark even in the rain with wet bark. The same for birtch wood itself will burn well even when wet; this is because there is so much oil in the sap. For clean burning you can't beat aspen. Pine is good if you want to hear the snaps and pops it makes as it burns...Oak is another good long burning wood. Ceder like some have suggested to here gives off an unpleasent smell and can even effect the taste of any food cooked over it.
  • Hickory or oak only. Other woods are either too soft or they emit dangerous levels of creosote.
  • Use what is usually available near you and dry. Always look for what has fallen ("deadfall") and son't cut a living tree. Look for big chunks so they will last longer.Pine is not really good because it contains a lot of sap: sparks can fly out and burn you. Starting a fire with pinecones is good though. Hardwoods are best because they don't burn as quickly. If you are cooking and can get any type of fruit wood, they are good. They are hard so they last a long time. Try cherry or apple. When I go camping I start my fire and when done cooking find a fallen tree. We drag one end into the fire and when it's burned up, just keep pushing more of the log in.
  • Depends on what kind of a fire. If you want just lots of heat, dry softwood burns very hot and quick, but it will be gone really fast. If you want long heat and a good bed of coals, you'll choose dry hardwood.
  • Any coniferous wood made into a fuzz stick,used with Silver Birch bark....hey presto,no probs.
  • old dry wood... unless you like fireworks
  • The type of wood with gasoline all over it. and perhaps some sort of really dry cedar....
  • oak or pine....;)
  • Well it depends. A fire for heating, cooking or just to have fun, such as a bonfire? For a bonfire: you can use anything available. (I would recommend staying away from pressure treated lumber lumber though that can emit a poisonous vapor.) For cooking: I recommend any deadfall you can find laying around. Hickory or apple can give a great flavor to anything you may be cooking. For heating: You want hardwoods such as oak, maple, cherry, birch, beech, hickory or ash. I recommend staying completely away from softwoods as they create creosote that will coat your chimney and create a fire hazard and they just burn too quickly. You can start a fire with smaller pieces of the above and newspaper.
  • Dry wood
  • The dry wood you have is the best.
  • Fire wood....silly
  • pine knots work really well, i dont know if they are the best.
  • They sell man made logs engineered with all the qualities that pone might want. They are actual wood chips pressed together with a kind of waxy substance. You can just light the log and it will burn perfectly with a nice flame, a nice smell, little ashing, etc. for the duration it says on the clean easy to store bag it comes in.
  • Apple wood smells gorgeous when burnt
  • Real wood as opposed to that fake veneer stuff they sell now!
  • depends on what type of fire you need - for heating live oak is some of the hotest btu burning wood
  • liter, basically pine that has died and the sap has dried out thats the best of the best. trust me i know
  • The kind that burns... *Seriously... Green, sap laden or wet woods do not burn.
  • liter, basically dead pine that the sap has dried in it. trust me i know
  • I like oak. Wow, that very similar to "I like Ike" whon I never voted for...not old enough...
  • If you are talking about burning in your fireplace, you want only hardwoods. Soft woods like pine create to much creosote in the chimney which causes a fire hazzard.

Copyright 2020, Wired Ivy, LLC

Answerbag | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy