ANSWERS: 3
  • Autism is classed as a disability in a legal and medical sense, since people with autism often have trouble interacting with their environment. Of course there is a spectrum for autism, and some are more high functioning then others, meaning they have less trouble interacting with their environment, and governing their emotions. To label anything as a disability, is to understand how the person operates compared to those who do not have that said disability, or what they refer to as "normal control," and this is so needs can be met, and understanding or care can be provided in those areas.
    • Shadow
      Autism is seen as a disability by those who do not have it so they label autistic people as having a disability just because they are different. Who told you that autism is a disability? Was it a psychiatrist or a doctor of some sort? It takes more than a doctor to know that autism is difference and not a disability. Where did you get your information from? Control freaks have expectations of others and anyone who fits in their brain are classed as “normal” which is a boring word. Everyone is different in the real world which control freaks have a problem with so when they see someone who doesn’t meet their expectations are seen as having a disability but that’s being judgmental. Some people who don’t interact with others does not necessarily mean they have autism.
    • Creamcrackered
      I have two autistic neighbours, in their 40's and 50's, one has problems regulating emotion, he usually comes to the women neighbours and we have difficulty calming him down especially when he is angry, he doesn't look us in the eye, he doesn't understand social cues, he is emotionally dependent on the other woman neighbour here, but comes to me for some things, he is a vulnerable adult, easily exploited so we watch out for him, he also hates loud noises. The other is not so high functioning, her close relative is very ill and she has become self neglectful, not bathing, not eating, and not looking after herself, this is because it's a change in her routine, autistic people struggle to adapt to change. She is very much a child, she has a flat full of teddy bears and struggles with her emotions, and things not going straight forward, she doesn't like to be touched, and she does not give eye contact. She is vulnerable. I also know a young boy, he is struggling at school because he isn't aware of danger, and so the other school boys tell him to jump off the roof and he will, he has broken his arm, he doesn't understand that they are bullying him. I have also worked in a field with autistic children, and it was extremely rewarding. Hence, it is wise to understand these conditions in order to care for, understand and protect people on the autistic spectrum, so that you know what level of interaction they are capable of, and so what to expect from them. I suffer chronic pain, I was involved in an accident a number of years ago, that caused me some damage, there are some things I cannot do because of it, and it is frustrating that I am living in a body that will not function to my will, but I do have a long term disability as there is no cure, and so people cannot expect me to be capable of what a physically healthy person can do.
    • Shadow
      It’s not their fault that they are like that though because autism can develop in a person or have it since birth. I have Aspergers Syndrome which is a form of autism and I can accept change overtime.
    • Creamcrackered
      I didn't say it was their fault, it's not, but like anything that may put someone at a disadvantage, or lead them to be misunderstood, or treated in a way that could be detrimental to them, there has to be some understanding as to what that particular individual needs. I have an autistic (more Asperger's) friend she works in the local garage and cafe, she is very particular and makes sure everything is done, an efficient worker, the only thing she lacks sometimes is understanding some social cues, (I'll give you an example, one day it was really busy at the cafe, she was making the hot drinks, and a woman complained that her drink wasn't right, so in response, my friend started explaining how she'd made the drink, because in her mind she had followed "How to make the coffee," to the letter, what she didn't get was that the woman was saying "it wasn't right, or hot enough for her," and instead of just throwing it away and making another and asking the woman how she wanted it, she began to justify how it was made, it was just a small thing, easily remedied, but of course we understand how Asperger's affects her, and the customer does not, because we hang out with her). My neighbours are different, they are unable to work, because they struggle with social interaction, and emotional regulation. Same as pain or physical disability, people suffer different types, but it's good for physicians, friends etc, to understand how that affects the person. Believe me, it's frustrating when someone who doesn't suffer or understand pain, makes demands on me I cannot live up to, you get fed up explaining yourself, even to family sometimes, but when I meet with other people in the same situation as me, we get it, we just get it. Same reason my friend who has cerebral palsy meets up with others who have the same condition, I can identify with pain, but not her condition, I can imagine, I can listen, I can empathise, have an idea, but can never know her experience.
    • Shadow
      I understand that people can’t empathise with someone’s disability but we can empathise with feelings, pain and situations. I know you did not say it’s their fault. I was just pointing out. It’s interesting to hear other people’s story that relates to autism. I am reading a book at the moment called Autism Is The Future which I got from the library. I only started reading it yesterday. It’s interesting so far
    • Creamcrackered
      I'll see if I can get hold of a copy Shadow, and have a butchers myself. When I was first diagnosed with chronic pain, there were very few books that dealt with it, so I started reading about other conditions, I read Michael J Foxes' book regarding his experience with Parkinson's, and Christopher Reeves book regarding his paralyze, I identified with the latter the most as he spoke about preferring sleep and the dream life, than real life, because when he woke up his reality was extremely hard to deal with, I could identify with that, because being in pain is a nightmare, and when your asleep you are away from it. I've also read books about Bipolar especially from those who have it, such as Stephen Fry and Adam Ant because I have family members and friends with it, I've read books by people who have children with autism, so I'll check that one out Shadow, is it from the perspective of someone with autism?
    • Shadow
      The author of the book, Marlo Payne, does not personally have autism but they have interviewed and assessed people with autism for their own research. You can Google Marlo Payne. She may not have autism but the book is interesting based on interviews and assessments. Autism Is The Future is the book’s title. Marlo is American.
    • Creamcrackered
      Ok, thank you Shadow, I'll google the author and see if the book is in the library.
    • Shadow
      Did you look up the author on Google and is the book available in your local library?
    • Creamcrackered
      I've looked up the author, the book looks good, haven't been to local library, I will this week.
    • Shadow
      Ok
    • Shadow
      When I read further into the book it became difficult reading for me. It’s not exactly an easy going book for me. Sometimes when I read something and there is a word I don’t know the meaning of, I read ahead to the end of the sentence to get an idea what the word is about. There is a lot of big words for me in Autism Is The Future.
  • I consider some people with autism to be disabled, and some not. Some autistic people literaly won't survive without constant intensive care taking which often requires financial support and resources from communities and governments. There has to be a label that distinguishes between people who need that care and those who don't in order to determine who to deliver the help to. We could change that word to something else, but there still needs to be a word for it. It's not meant to be disrespectful
    • mushroom
      People with autistic traits are often referred to being "on the spectrum" because there are many related disorders and disabilities. In very general terms, one might be "high functioning" meaning generally able to lead an independent life. Those with Asperger's syndrome are often fully functioning but limited at responding appropriately to social cues. There's much more of course to the spectrum.
    • AskingForaFriend
      Oh yeah- absolutely! Thanks for adding that. I could be wrong but I think Asperger's isn't an official diagnosis or term anymore. I think it's just called "on the spectrum" or Autistic Spectrum Disorder. Which works for me since I could never pronounce it. Ass burgers. I'd cringe on the inside when I'd hear myself say it like that
  • Its a difference that can be a disability. You can't just make up your own definitions because you don't like a word. You can call it kangaroo of you want it doesn't change what really is, it just makes you wrong with a different word. Why do you want to take disability status away from those who need it? That's just wrong!!
    • Shadow
      I do not take away anyone’s disability status. Everyone has a disability of some sort whether they have autism or not. Autism is difference and misunderstood by some people who do not have it.

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