ANSWERS: 12
  • The Microsoft XBox has the best graphics of any console system to date. Almost every review of a game that is released on 2 or all 3 systems (e.g. Sports games, etc.) will say that the Xbox has the best graphics. It just boils down to the hardware within the system itself. The Xbox was designed like a mini PC with an NVidia Graphics chip. I own a PS2, GameCube, and Xbox. I can also say from personal experience also that the Xbox has the best graphics capabilities. More Xbox games support HD Resolutions which rival PC graphics if you have an HDTV Capable of displaying them. This doesn't mean that the graphics for the other two systems are horrible, just that the Xbox looks better than them. If I had to rank the 3 systems in graphics, I would rank them as so: 1.)Xbox 2.)Playstation2 3.)GameCube Re Comment: This answer is from my own personal experience of owning all three systems, an extensive game library for them, and component video cables hooked into an HD Display. If this site allowed pictures, I could provide several copies of magazine reviews that state exactly the same thing regarding games released on multiple systems, and the Xbox having the edge in graphics.
  • The Xbox has the most powerful hardware. Second is the Gamecube. It can push slightly less polygons and has less RAM, which means that the textures are often worse than on the Xbox. The differences are not that big, though. Most games that run on both consoles look the same. Clearly worst is the PS2. It can push a lot less polygons, has little RAM and doesn't have a lot of the other graphic features the other consoles have (bump mapping, interlacing and others). This is not Sony's fault, fact is that the PS2 is a year older than the other two consoles, and it's harder to program for the PS2, so the games look a lot worse than on the Cube or the Xbox.
  • The PlayStation 2 is EXTREMELY far behind the other 2. It can push around 3 to 5 million polygons per second The GameCube tends to push around 12, and the Xbox 16. Bear in mind that the Nintendo 64 pushed around 120,000 and you will understand the difference is not that much. It all depends on the developer. Compare Resident Evil 4 to, say, Halo 2 and you will think the GameCube is better. However, impressive technical Xbox games, like Sudeki, actually have the GameCube beat. Overall here is the ranking 1) Xbox 2) GameCube 3 PlayStation 2 Check out some system specifications if you don't believe me. Also note that Sony and Microsoft lie when they talk about Polygon performance. They talk in raw numbers, Nintendo and Sega talk 'in game' numbers. Also note that this is not classified information. It is easily available.
  • Art is the biggest factor on how good a game looks. This depends completely on the game, so it is pointless to generalise over different consoles. Other then that, it all comes down to how powerful the console is. Order: Xbox, GCN, PS2. Deal with it.
  • Xbox of course. The others dont suck or anything, Xbox just has a faster Nvidia chip
  • I am not completely sure, but in my opinion, the GameCube has the best graphics, in that it is 3D and it can also turn into a 2D screen with a GameBoy linker and a GameCube adapter.
  • There has been a very big debate over who has better graphics. In my opinion, Gamecube is just not in the PS2 or Xbox's league so we can count that out. There are many pro's and con's about each systems graphic campablilites. Xbox come from Microsoft who has created some of the best graphic devices around. Although it doesn't have to many games using Xbox's very limit to graphics. PS2 come from Sony who are manufacturers of Plasma T.Vs etc which definitely gives a reason for PS2. Unfortunately there is not to much evidence in the PS2's games that shows that it triumphs over Xbox. One excellent example is Tekken 5 but i have seen little more games like that. In my opinion, Xbox's graphics beat PS2's graphics. But only just.
  • Many of the "answers" on here seem to be from biased opinions. Allow me to explain simply the differences between each system. Playstation 2 - This came out first of the three systems, and is said to be the weakest. This however is not the fault of the hardware, but simply the fact that the system is extremely difficult to program for. There is 32MB of System RAM, and 4MB on-chip on the GS. The GS has 16 parallel pixel pipelines and is heavily dependant on extreme parallelism to produce great graphics. All the work though is done in the Emotion Engine, which is powerful to do polygon calculations and effects by itself. The Emotion Engine is also capable of generating studio-quality effects. Sony reports the PS2 can do 75 million polgons a sec, but the highest count for a game so far is around 20-25 million for Jak 2 and God of War. PS2 supports up to 1080i (Gran Turismo 4) but most games only use 480i or 480p. Best graphical games to look for are God of War, Gran Turismo 4, Jak 2&3, MGS3, Final Fantasy, Tekken 5, and the Devil May Cry series. Xbox - This was released 1 year after the Playstation 2. This is said by many to be the strongest. One of the main reasons why the Xbox has "superior graphics" is because of how easy it is to program for. It is basically a dumbed-down PC using DirectX, which programmers are very familiar with. It has 64MB of RAM, all of which is shared, and a Nvidia Graphics processor, (i.e. Geforce 3.) The Nvidia chip has 4 pixel pipelines and is programmable. This is very similar to PC hardware. Microsoft reports the Xbox can do 125 million polygons a second, however the Geforce 3 can only do around 30-35. They have yet to explain how an extra vertex shader can add the 90 million or so more a second. Most Xbox games run between 15-25 million per second, depending on the title. HD resolutions are supported, from 480p to 1080i and standard at 480i. Graphical games to look for would be the Halo series, or any game that makes use of the 720p/1080i resolutions. Gamecube - This was released around the same time as the Xbox. This is said by many to be in between the two (PS2 and Xbox) as graphical capable. The system architecture is similar to a Mac, (PowerPC processor and ATI graphics.) The System has 40MB of RAM, but only 24MB is availible for graphics processing, the other 16MB is allocated for other tasks such as audio, etc. The ATI graphics processor was actually developed by ArtX and has no programmable shaders, while the Xbox does, and the PS2's Emotion Engine is powerful enough to do the same in software. Most of the better games will run between 15-25 million polygons a sec, about the same as PS2 and Xbox. While in theory, the Gamecube supports 480p resolution, ever since Nintendo decided to remove the Component Cable option from Gamecubes, you can only run in 480i. This decision makes the Gamecube incabable of producing graphics as good as the PS2 or Xbox. It may be doing them on the hardware, but on your television, it is not. Conclusion: There are always going to be bad games for every system. Many of the PS2 titles that show "inferior graphics" are because of developers that are inexperienced. The Xbox is the easiest console to program for, and therefore will have good games to start with. For total system power, assume the Xbox and PS2 are about equal if pushed to their limits, the Xbox may show a slight advantage in some points, while the PS2 in others. The Xbox uses standard PC architecture while the PS2 is completely new. The Gamecube would have to be rated below the other two because of Nintendo's component output lack of support. Overall, people will have their opinions. This was written to clear things up from a clear view and focuses on the facts.
  • Many of the "answers" on here seem to be from biased opinions. Allow me to explain simply the differences between each system. Playstation 2 - This came out first of the three systems, and is said to be the weakest. This however is not the fault of the hardware, but simply the fact that the system is extremely difficult to program for. There is 32MB of System RAM, and 4MB on-chip on the GS. The GS has 16 parallel pixel pipelines and is heavily dependant on extreme parallelism to produce great graphics. All the work though is done in the Emotion Engine, which is powerful to do polygon calculations and effects by itself. The Emotion Engine is also capable of generating studio-quality effects. Sony reports the PS2 can do 75 million polgons a sec, but the highest count for a game so far is around 20-25 million for Jak 2 and God of War. PS2 supports up to 1080i (Gran Turismo 4) but most games only use 480i or 480p. Best graphical games to look for are God of War, Gran Turismo 4, Jak 2&3, MGS3, Final Fantasy, Tekken 5, and the Devil May Cry series. Xbox - This was released 1 year after the Playstation 2. This is said by many to be the strongest. One of the main reasons why the Xbox has "superior graphics" is because of how easy it is to program for. It is basically a dumbed-down PC using DirectX, which programmers are very familiar with. It has 64MB of RAM, all of which is shared, and a Nvidia Graphics processor, (i.e. Geforce 3.) The Nvidia chip has 4 pixel pipelines and is programmable. This is very similar to PC hardware. Microsoft reports the Xbox can do 125 million polygons a second, however the Geforce 3 can only do around 30-35. They have yet to explain how an extra vertex shader can add the 90 million or so more a second. Most Xbox games run between 15-25 million per second, depending on the title. HD resolutions are supported, from 480p to 1080i and standard at 480i. Graphical games to look for would be the Halo series, or any game that makes use of the 720p/1080i resolutions. Gamecube - This was released around the same time as the Xbox. This is said by many to be in between the two (PS2 and Xbox) as graphical capable. The system architecture is similar to a Mac, (PowerPC processor and ATI graphics.) The System has 40MB of RAM, but only 24MB is availible for graphics processing, the other 16MB is allocated for other tasks such as audio, etc. The ATI graphics processor was actually developed by ArtX and has no programmable shaders, while the Xbox does, and the PS2's Emotion Engine is powerful enough to do the same in software. Most of the better games will run between 15-25 million polygons a sec, about the same as PS2 and Xbox. While in theory, the Gamecube supports 480p resolution, ever since Nintendo decided to remove the Component Cable option from Gamecubes, you can only run in 480i. This decision makes the Gamecube incabable of producing graphics as good as the PS2 or Xbox. It may be doing them on the hardware, but on your television, it is not. Conclusion: There are always going to be bad games for every system. Many of the PS2 titles that show "inferior graphics" are because of developers that are inexperienced. The Xbox is the easiest console to program for, and therefore will have good games to start with. For total system power, assume the Xbox and PS2 are about equal if pushed to their limits, the Xbox may show a slight advantage in some points, while the PS2 in others. The Xbox uses standard PC architecture while the PS2 is completely new. The Gamecube would have to be rated below the other two because of Nintendo's component output lack of support. Overall, people will have their opinions. This was written to clear things up from a clear view and focuses on the facts.
  • Many of the "answers" on here seem to be from biased opinions. Allow me to explain simply the differences between each system. Playstation 2 - This came out first of the three systems, and is said to be the weakest. This however is not the fault of the hardware, but simply the fact that the system is extremely difficult to program for. There is 32MB of System RAM, and 4MB on-chip on the GS. The GS has 16 parallel pixel pipelines and is heavily dependant on extreme parallelism to produce great graphics. All the work though is done in the Emotion Engine, which is powerful to do polygon calculations and effects by itself. The Emotion Engine is also capable of generating studio-quality effects. Sony reports the PS2 can do 75 million polgons a sec, but the highest count for a game so far is around 20-25 million for Jak 2 and God of War. PS2 supports up to 1080i (Gran Turismo 4) but most games only use 480i or 480p. Best graphical games to look for are God of War, Gran Turismo 4, Jak 2&3, MGS3, Final Fantasy, Tekken 5, and the Devil May Cry series. Xbox - This was released 1 year after the Playstation 2. This is said by many to be the strongest. One of the main reasons why the Xbox has "superior graphics" is because of how easy it is to program for. It is basically a dumbed-down PC using DirectX, which programmers are very familiar with. It has 64MB of RAM, all of which is shared, and a Nvidia Graphics processor, (i.e. Geforce 3.) The Nvidia chip has 4 pixel pipelines and is programmable. This is very similar to PC hardware. Microsoft reports the Xbox can do 125 million polygons a second, however the Geforce 3 can only do around 30-35. They have yet to explain how an extra vertex shader can add the 90 million or so more a second. Most Xbox games run between 15-25 million per second, depending on the title. HD resolutions are supported, from 480p to 1080i and standard at 480i. Graphical games to look for would be the Halo series, or any game that makes use of the 720p/1080i resolutions. Gamecube - This was released around the same time as the Xbox. This is said by many to be in between the two (PS2 and Xbox) as graphical capable. The system architecture is similar to a Mac, (PowerPC processor and ATI graphics.) The System has 40MB of RAM, but only 24MB is availible for graphics processing, the other 16MB is allocated for other tasks such as audio, etc. The ATI graphics processor was actually developed by ArtX and has no programmable shaders, while the Xbox does, and the PS2's Emotion Engine is powerful enough to do the same in software. Most of the better games will run between 15-25 million polygons a sec, about the same as PS2 and Xbox. While in theory, the Gamecube supports 480p resolution, ever since Nintendo decided to remove the Component Cable option from Gamecubes, you can only run in 480i. This decision makes the Gamecube incabable of producing graphics as good as the PS2 or Xbox. It may be doing them on the hardware, but on your television, it is not. Conclusion: There are always going to be bad games for every system. Many of the PS2 titles that show "inferior graphics" are because of developers that are inexperienced. The Xbox is the easiest console to program for, and therefore will have good games to start with. For total system power, assume the Xbox and PS2 are about equal if pushed to their limits, the Xbox may show a slight advantage in some points, while the PS2 in others. The Xbox uses standard PC architecture while the PS2 is completely new. The Gamecube would have to be rated below the other two because of Nintendo's component output lack of support. Overall, people will have their opinions. This was written to clear things up from a clear view and focuses on the facts.
  • Well there you go.
  • The answer is, it depends. If you're talking about pure poly throughput, ie, raw, flat-shaded polys, then it's 1)Xbox, 2) PS2 and then 3) Gamecube. If you're talking about environment-mapped polys with multiple light sources(or basically, maxing the effects out), then it's 1) Xbox, 2) Gamecube, then 3) PS2. The Xbox and Gamecube are both easier to program for, and it's true that developers have a harder time with the PS2, because you need to manually code the VU chip to achieve effects that can be done with library calls on the Gamecube.

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