ANSWERS: 2
  • 3-9-2017 You really really need to learn what the words mean before you expose yourself in public. 'Paradise' is Greek for 'garden', which is a walled place with flowing water, either natural or man made. The garden of Eden did not exist when Jesus spoke, and they were both dying, so it is bonkers to say that the thief would be in paradise that day. Jesus said "Verily I say unto thee today," which was a common expression at that time. "Today" did not modify "thou shalt be with me," it was a separate sentence. Regardless of your prejudices, this stuff is all real so it all has to make sense in the real world, remembering that some things were said in figures of speech that are not literally true. 2 Peter 3:16 "As also in all his epistles, speaking in them of these things; in which are some things hard to be understood, which they that are unlearned and unstable wrest, as they do also the other scriptures, unto their own destruction." As for hell, that is a hole and a hole is a grave. Check any dictionary. Every body goes there.
    • Anoname
      I'm a believer - with some Seminary training. Abraham's bosum and Paradise are one and the same. This was not referring to the Garden of Eden but a gardenLIKE place where those faithful to God went to , to await being taken to God's presence. Nobody was justified to be His presence before Jesus reconciled us to Him. Jewish belief was that this was a compartment within Hell. Paradise was moved to God's presence upon Jesus' ascention - in His train. He took captivity captive in this way. My theology is sound. The "hole" argument is usually used by anihilationists. Thank you for your perspective.
    • Jewels Vern
      You have been taught bullshit. The bible does not say any such thing. If the bible doesn't say something, it could only be made up by somebody else.
    • Anoname
      Again, thank you for your perspective. Since you deny Jesus decended into Hell for us at all - as you choose not to believe that Hell even exists - you are unable to answer the question as asked.
    • Jewels Vern
      You have very good manners. I am pleasantly surprised.
    • Jewels Vern
      BTW I have never said hell does not exist. I have always said hell is a hole is a grave: everybody goes there.
  • Hell in Greek means the common grave of mankind. When one dies they are nonexistent, Ecclesiastics 9:5,10 makes it clear that there is no life in the grave. Jesus also says death is like going to sleep until awaken at John 11:11. Jesus did not say he would be in paradise that exact day he said "Truly I tell you today, You will be with me in paradise". Luke 23:42 has been applied wrong by some by removing the comma. Jesus was dead for three days, asleep in death until God resurrected him on the 3rd day. He did not die on a cross, but on a stake or tree.
    • Anoname
      I've researched this theory and found it flawed. I disagree with you but appreciate your viewpoint.
    • beaker95
      Very civil....
    • Gone!
      Hell in this case is the realm of the dead. Many scholars have noticed that Jesus uses "truly I tell you" as a prefix phrase when He is about to say something that should be listened to with care. Seventy-six times in the New Testament, Jesus uses the phrase. Interestingly, no one but Jesus ever says it. When the Lord says ?I tell you the truth,? He is affirming that what He is about to say is worthy of special attention. It was Jesus? way of saying, ?Listen up! What I?m about to say is very important and should be listened to carefully.? We?re too used to hearing the phrase to appreciate the astonishing authority it expresses and the often solemn nature of the announcement that follows. In every one of the 76 times Christ uses this introductory phrase, He simply says it and then makes a startling statement. It would be strange indeed if, in this one instance, Jesus departed from His normal way of making His signature statement by adding the word today to it. In every case where this sort of introductory phrase is used, Greek scholars add a punctuation break after the phrase in question and before the rest of the statement. So, the translators have it right. The comma in Luke 23:43 belongs where they put it. (https://www.gotquestions.org/today-paradise.html)
    • Anoname
      Well said, Gone !
    • Jewels Vern
      Bear in mind that the original scriptures, both Greek and Hebrew, had no punctuation, no capitalization, no verse numbers, no chapters, no center references. All those things were added by somebody to give their opinion of what the scriptures should have said. Punctuation and capitalization are required in English. For example, every time the text says "pneuma hagion", "holy spirit", the interpreter must decide if that is God, which must be capitalized, or God's gift to believers, which is not capitalized. In that way, God has prevented the interpretation of His word by any central authority; every believer has to read the scriptures and decide for himself what it means and whether it was translated correctly.

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