ANSWERS: 3
  • It doesn't have to be really all that formal, or even formatted in a particular way (if at all). I've worked for a credit bureau, and now I work in the mortgage department of a bank, and I see credit explanation letters all the time. sometimes people hand write them on stationary, or even post-it notes. I've even seen one where they hand wrote it out on a part of the page and ripped the rest of the page around it away. It's all the same, as long as you sufficiently explain the situation! Hope that helps! :)
  • If you have Microsoft office you can go here and get a template. http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/templates/results.aspx?qu=collection+letter&av=TPL000
  • I agree with the Busle2 and Idne gave you a great "format" idea. Try not to ramble on and on and on...Give the facts, if there were unexpected expenses, or if it was a customer service problem. Also state HOW YOU RESOLVED the situation, ultimately. If you did resolve it...contact the creditor (if you have not already) and ask if they would remove the negative remarks. You can also contact the credit reporting agency if it's been over 5 - 7 years and ask them to remove the negative...with your explanation. You have the right to ASK and after all, nothing ventured, nothing gained...sometimes they will take them off. Lastly in your letter...state what steps you have taken to try and prevent such a problem from occurring again. At the end thank them for reviewing your information. Something like: Thank you in advance for your kind consideration in reviewing this information. If there is anything else I might provide to assist you in making a positive decision regarding my request, please let me know and I will be happy to comply. (be sure to include all of your contact information as well.)

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