ANSWERS: 39
  • There definitely are traffic circles in the US, but they aren't very common. I'm not aware of a policy against creating new ones.
  • there are 2 in syracuse, n.y.. Carrier circle & GM circle. they work real good. couldn't do it any other way.
  • There's one on Camp Lejeune (Marine base). I know because while my husband was stationed there I found it and got excited, and rode it about three times before seeing the MP's watching me and turning off. I thought it was fun!
  • I know of one in New Orleans (I guess it's still there), and at least 2 in Houston Texas. I am sure I have encountered more but these are the only ones which comes to mind right now.
  • There are several scattered throughout the country, but they are not as popular as other methods.
  • There are some, they just aren't widely used. I never heard of any laws prohibiting them, nor have I heard of them causing too many accidents.
  • We have a traffic circle in Tulsa, and I know there is one in Long Beach, CA. Or at least there used to be one when I lived there.
  • There are a quite a few in Michigan including the campus of Michigan State University... though they recently removed one of the ones on campus. Quite a few people have no idea how to use them...
  • I just used two "roundabouts" driving from Boston to Cape Cod last month. They were great and everyone used them perfectly. However, the city of Pasadena, CA has put one in at a four-way intersection as an attempt to ease traffic congestion, but they left up the stop signs which defeats the whole purpose! That one always scares me to drive through because nobody's sure what to do -- talk about causing an accident!
  • There are some out here. I have to go through one in Blaine, MN when I go to work...I don't entirely understand the idea behind them, but they exist here.
  • There are quite a few in New Jersey (where they were invented, or so I've heard) and in New England. In NJ, they changed the law in the 1960's so that traffic entering the circle has the Right of Way (if not otherwise posted). Previously, traffic on the circle had RoW. To this date, there are still two types of circle drivers: those who are terrified and those who are so accustomed to it that they speed through.
    • mushroom
      NJ is also infamous for the jughandle.-- that's what you get when you don't want to spend on a full cloverleaf.
  • I've encountered a few of them here in Virginia.
  • THey are definitely here in the US. In fact, the county I left back in California was in the process of making a brand new to redirect and move up to 6 lanes of traffic!!! Crazy if you ask me. No one in California knows how to use those things. Bad idea. People stop and wait to merge, plugging up everyone. Glad I moved!
  • Hell no! We have two in Keene, NH and are doing MAJOR construction to put in two more. They are fairly common in Massachusetts and not unheard of in Vermont and NH. It's funny watching flatlanders (out-of-staters) try to figure them out.
  • We have some in WI they are trying to add more. I don't really like them. They are a bit annoying. Then again, I am not always much for change.
  • In Nashville, we have two roundabouts. So far, so good. No accidents.
  • Once I went to Washington, D.C. and there were tons of traffic circles.
  • The city I live in in the US has loads of them and they are putting more in all the time. Also, Indianpolis, IN has a really big one right in the center of downtown and that is one reason it is known as "Circle City".
  • They constantly build them in the ritzy neighborhoods here in Florida.
  • Not true, many survive. But many have been removed or reconfigured. One traffic specialist says they were invented in N.J. At least lots were built. (invention??) Some designers and planners (especially architects) still think they look cute. Here's the real scoop: They work perfectly well for light volume medium design-speed local roads. But the benefit of stop-sign elimination is their only advantage. And they bend fenders at high volumes and kill at high speeds. No policy forbids them that I know of. As long as the local accident count stays low, existing circles can survive.
  • There's at least one that I know of in Colorado Springs, CO.
  • They're few and far between, but they exist. Depending on where one particular traffic light is in it's cycle on my way to work, I sometimes go through one in the mornings on my way in.
  • It's not as prevalent as is in Europe, but they do exist in the USA too.
  • we have a few here in Tulsa OK
  • They are all over in Cape Cod, MA, and there's one in Niagara Falls, NY.
  • They are in the process of building the Loop 202 in Az and if you head east there are roundabouts. I strongly dislike them because people do not take enough precaution and are definitely not the most courteous.
  • There are several in Northeast Ohio, and at least one that I know of in Las Vegas. They aren't as prevalent as other countries, but they exist, and don't have as many accidents as you might think. People tend to go through them very cautiously because they are not the 'norm.'
  • I use two rotaries or roundabouts everyday when I drive to and from work.
  • There are some here in Columbus.
  • They are everywhere in New England.... and personally I hate them.
  • there are like 5 in DC.
  • There are some pretty much all over the US, but they do not put any new ones in when they design new streets because there were a lot of accidents associated with them. There are only two in the Kansas City Missouri area that I know of and only one is traditional.
  • They're everywhere in New England, and where I used to live in Virginia, there were quite a few. I think they're very pleasing visually, but I'd really rather just have an intersection.
  • I know of 2 in Orange County, NY and hate them both.
  • Where did you hear this? There are tons of rotaries (roundabouts) in the United States. They are all over Boston, and I've seen plenty in upstate NY.
  • yeah there are plenty of them in Maryland as well. I think it was slow coming but it is getting to be more commonplace and I think it makes traffic flow better, but just like everything else in the world )technology, architecture etc) America is slow to change compared to the rest of the world
  • you either have never lived anywhere but America your whole life and know nothing about the rest of the world or you have never been to america and know nothing about how lame it is in the technology and mass transit and architecture compared to the rest of the world.
  • 5-21-2017 There are several in my town and they are building two more for a freeway interchange. They started a big roundabout where two major streets intersect, but then decided that for the land it used up they could make a really nice ordinary intersection. IMO a roundabout is barely ok but takes a lot of space to be safe.
  • I suppose you haven't been to New Jersey. Plenty of those there.

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