ANSWERS: 6
  • Certainly there are alternatives to fixing it other than a mechanic. But you must first diagnose the cause of the problem. Knowing how to find the problem and knowing how to resolve it is what mechanics get paid to do. There are many good repair manuals on the market, however, most repair manuals are written from the prospective of someone who is mechanically inclined and/or has a basic idea of how machinery works. You could ask for help from one of your friends or relatives, however, if their mechanical knowledge is less than average its likely that you might get your car fixed with a few extra parts left over.
  • I had the similar problems a couple of years back, like the other answer i had snapped timing belt too. Timing belts are supposed to be changed every 100k. miles. I was also on the interstate when similar symptoms occurred. Although my water pump blew which caused my timing belt to snap and bend my valves. This isnt an easy fix if thats the case. I would too get a diagnostics test.
  • Distributor module may have died
  • Year, make, model, engine....If it is an overhead cam engine pull the oil fill cap on the valve cover and have somebody crank it over...The cam shaft should be visable inside the cover and if, when the engine is cranked, the cam does not turn it has lost it's timing belt...
  • THE SAME THING HAPPENED TO ME WITH MY LINCOLN TOWNCAR WITH A 5.0 ENGINE. I CHANGED THE WHOLE DIS AND IT RAN PERFACT.
  • Did the engine start again and run OK for a while then do it again? If so you could have a burned intake valve. This happened to me many years ago and no mechanic could find the problem. An old shade-tree mechanic knew what the problem was and replaced and ground the valves. never had the problem again.

Copyright 2018, Wired Ivy, LLC

Answerbag | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy