ANSWERS: 31
  • I don't know if I'd say wrong as much as I'd say it's thoughtless, rude and flat out ridiculous. If it were that easy, no one would be mentally ill, now, would they? And yet I know folks who have issues who have family/friends who just don't understand and have told them countless times to "snap out of it."
  • Um, yeah thats not right. I can't stand people like that, they just don't believe in mental illness as if it were like not believing in ghosts or aliens. THEY are the one's who need to snap out of it. I don't understand people like that.
  • Yes I do..its pure ignorance..
  • ya i'd say your intentions seem pretty harsh there. If it was for science then no.
  • You're kidding, right? I have never heard of someone being that ignorant.
  • I don't think there's nothing wrong with having that thought.
  • I think it's misguided and probably a bit insenstitive to say that to someone in the situation, and could possibly make it worse. As to if it's wrong or not? It depends on the persons intentions and knowledge of the situation.
  • I think it is wrong on every level. I sort of half expect one to say oh you mean like this and snap their neck.
  • Yes, it is wrong, because mental illness is just that, an illness, and needs to be treated with a combination of medicine and psychiatric treatment/psychotherapy. A mentally ill person can't just "snap out of it," because for them, what would they then snap "to"? They are not in full touch with reality, and are also often mentally "slow" or "foggy" (a symptom of the condition) and the trouble is, their condition is still widely misunderstood despite progresses in recent decades. I should know - I've been through it (1977, again in 1982, and somewhat in 1986 when I had severe post-partum depression). I have a bipolar disorder but it's controlled sufficiently well with Lamictal and Wellbutrin, in small doses daily, and has been under control for over 22 years. Your question is a viable one, thanks for posing it!!
  • Not only wrong, but downright stupid!
  • Yes, because even if they feel like they WANT to just snap out of it, they can't since they are mentally ill. It is being insensitive to someone like that to say that. They need appropriate help, not to be told to snap out of it or anything similar.
  • It is not only wrong, it is insensitive and I promise you it makes things worse. People used to tell me that all the time and it makes them sound like they don't care (and probably didn't). Anyone who understands mental illness wouldn't say that to anyone. If they say that it shows their ignorance and there are a LOT of ignorant people around.
  • Yes. I think people that do things like that are ignorant to mental illness. I also think mental illness is one of the most misunderstood illnesses and many people don't even realize it is an actal illness. I've heard so many people make stupid remarks like that one or say things like "they do it on purpose" or "they can be just like everybody else if they wanted to", etc. it amazes me.
  • Of course. That is being very insensitive. Also, I don't like to hear people say "well they should be glad for this or that, etc.", that is also unfeeling. People that are depressed, mentally ill etc. need to have their feelings and thoughts validated.
  • well that would almost be like telling a fat person to stop eating
  • Telling them to snap out of their illness? You must be joking. What person would muster up such a sentence?
  • Sometimes they can snap out of a momentary departure from reality and come back for the moment. There are better ways to say it, and "snapping out of it" does not cure the disease.
  • Maybe they wouldn't know what you were talking about because what they are saying or doing is completely the right way as they see it.
  • If you know for sure that a person is mentally ill then you would be wasting your breath. I don't think I've ever said those words to anyone but maybe I just have a faulty memory. When I read questions on AB about people moaning and groaning about someone who done them wrong I always suggest they stop focusing on themselves and try to help someone else...I guess that's my way of saying "snap out of it"! :)
  • Let's play a game. Picture anything. Anything at all that you want - but under NO circumstances are you to picture a pink elephant on roller skates. Picture ANYTHING at ALL, EXCEPT a pink elephant on roller skates. What did you picture? A pink elephant on roller skates, right? That's how the mind works. The more you try to tell it NOT to do something, the more you can't NOT do it. Telling anyone not to perform some mental function (or dysfunction) will ALWAYS do more harm than good.
  • it is rude, and plain stupid. It is the same thing as tell person to snap out of their diabetus. People do not chose to be mentally ill.
  • I do think it is wrong to tell a mentally ill person to just 'snap out of it.' The problem is, people who are not mentally ill do not understand what it is like to suffer with a mental illness. They don't realize that mental illness is just the same as any other illness. If someone was diagnosed with some horrible disease, such as cancer or leukemia, I'm sure no one would tell them to 'just snap out of it'. You cannot just snap out of a mental illness. It is just as serious as any physical illness and should be treated with respect. If it was so easy to 'just snap out of it', everyone who has mental issues would do it! Who the heck wants to suffer? Mental illness is mind torture and there is no snapping out. It is just ignorance.
  • I wouldn't say it's wrong, but it demonstrates a lack of compassion and empathy. Except in rare instances, most people don't choose unhappiness and poor mental health. I would tell anyone who used that line that they might have to "snap out of it" one day.
  • It's a fine line, we cannot nor anybody really know who can or cannot snap out of it. Unless the person is truly mentally ill as opposed to have some emotional issues. People with severe mental illness cannot snap out of it. They need therapy and drugs. Neurotic self absorbed people can be snapped out of it, although it's temporary.
  • I would say ineffective is a better term than wrong.
  • It is incredibly ignorant and cruel to tell someone whom is suffering from mental illness to "just snap out of it". People often fear that which they do not understand, and are raised to regard something with contempt. So to those who valiantly hold the torch of flaming ignorance in simpering-childlike-splendor, I pity them, for they know not what they do. You rock Charlie ++++
  • Yes and No. It is good because they need to be made aware of their behaviors so that they can work on them, but telling them to "snap out of it" will most likely be ineffective. You need to find other way, like tell them how their disease and behavior is affecting you and assist them in finding help. Bad because often it places higher stress on people who really do not have the tools to change their behavior. And I say this as a person who has self-recovered from anorexia and depression. My husband used to call me on my anorexia BS about "already eaten" and complaining about being fat, and would let me know how it affected him. Then he helped me get to a therapist who helped me work through my issues.
  • It is wrong but people that don't understand mental illnesss will say that. They don't understand that it's not an issue of being happy or sad it's a chemical thing. It's hard for people to underatand that those with depression do try to be happy but just can't. I hear it a lot along with choose to be happy. Why are you so negative all the time, why do you CHOOSE not to better your life and be happy. They just don't get it. I have even had people tell me that it's of Satan and it means I am demon possessed. They are ignorant and don't want to learn the truth.
  • only if it's wrong to tell someone with cancer, to "shake it off", to get rid of their disease, or a diabetic to "know it off" to get rid of theirs. i think i make my point mental illness is no more "self-curable" than any other disease. it takes a trained specialist, medications and therapy to deal with mental illness, just like it takes to deal with other disorders.
  • Not sure if "wrong" is so much the right term as ignorant. It displays lack of both compassion and a basic understanding of the nature of mental illness. If someone suffering from a mental illness could "just snap out of it", then they would not be mentally ill. Statements like that often come from people, like Rush Limbaugh that many mental illnesses are somehow "not real".
  • I have had that said to me a few times,father,mother, they did before they fully understood my needs,now they are more educated about my bipolar disorder. Also had it happen in the hospital(or so it seemed to me at the time),out perception of how others see us and the words spoken in one light verses the other,,hmm,makes us think a little about how we might react to others comments.

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