ANSWERS: 23
  • Good question, although a feminist would probably say something like "I fight for your right to be feminine or masculine" although in my opinion you can't have it both ways. Feminists changed the word actress to actor (which is frankly ridiculous, next they'll want women to be called men) but they still want to be given maternity leave (not arguing with it, just pointing out the contradiction) and have men hold the door for them. Plus, if I punched a feminist in the face (as I would do if any man came out with some of the crap they spout) then I'm pretty sure they'd have something to say about me treating them as a man's equal. That's all I have, sorry for the rant and not really answering the question. Have 3 points to make up for it.
  • Femininity, I believe, is a group of random stereotypes that were and to a large extent still are unfairly foisted upon women, just as masculinity is upon men. Feminism advocates for political and social equal rights- it doesn't "kill" femininity, it just lets women know they have a choice (in my opinion).
  • I don't know what you mean. I like strong women. And, most strong women are still very much feminine.
  • Feminism didn't kill femininity, it just got a little led astray during the sexual revolution. You see, somehow some women got the idea in their heads that to be sexually equal to men they had to be sexually the same as men. This, to me, is the most overlooked result of the sexual revolution of the sixties and seventies. Hooray for reproduction rights and control and equal pay and respect, but someone forgot to mention that we are still different than men, and in general don't want exactly the same things they do. As a feminist I have to say it's fine for a woman to want to have sex constantly, with many partners, with no long term commitment. But I must add, also on behalf of feminism, that most women don't want that. It's not that femininity is dead, it just that we haven't found that balance we need. We aren't comfortable deciding to be brain surgeons that also bake casseroles, or FBI agents with nail polish addictions. As women integrate themselves more into these historically masculine roles, we will adapt the roles so that they suit us better. We will be able to be taken seriously as politicians and CEOs while wearing cocktail dresses.
  • I didn't notice.
  • I think western 'femininity' is a false construct...it's definition has varied through time and place...'rubenesque' used to be the height of femininity, and now those same women would be called by many 'fat cows' - also body hair, other grooming and personal hygiene, including makeup and perfume, even your loved manicures - these are simply conceits and trends that have been accepted by many as defining what is feminine. I personally prefer to have MY femininity defined by my actions and attitudes, my strength and compassion, NOT by fake plastic and petroleum products, artificial colors and ingredients (though I do indulge on occasion...I especially like to paint my toenails purple-blue opalescent with sparkles) but pink or purple or petticoats or bustles...these are not femininity...these are superficialities, trends, fashions. I think feminism is more concerned with serious, sometimes life and death issues, and that many, if not most, modern, mainstream feminists can be and are 'feminine' by today's societies various standards; many are not, and that's fine too, because it challenges others to 'look beyond the package', hopefully.
  • i don't think it did. for a woman, your feminism is how you define it. you can choose to be girly or not, but i don't think either choice makes you less of a woman. for example, i have to try very hard to prove myself as a woman in a "man's" job. so i wear jeans and boots, and i'm tough, and i know how to defend myself (verbally and physically). i would say this is a product of the feminist movement, but at the same time i am not ashamed to walk into a spa and be pampered. no macho man i know would do that...
  • Feminism is a belief in the political, social, and economic equality of women. It is a discourse that involves various movements, theories, and philosophies... Femininity refers to qualities and behaviors. If they kill Femininity they kill their behavior and qualities, do you think is that possible?
  • This question is a sweeping generalization. The original feminists activists, such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton, didn't believe that feminist women had to be masculine. Otherwise, one of the first feminist documents wouldn't have been called the "Declaration of Sentiments," because discussing feelings is considered "womanly." You just need to read articles from actual feminist writers instead of simply buying into pop culture's perspective on feminism. One feminist writer who's a strong advocate for femininity is Helen Cixous. Look her up.
  • because after they got what they needed they got power hungry. it became a game not of equal rights but rather claiming "anything you can do I can do better" in other words a pissing match.
  • It didn't. 'Feminity' means different things to different people - feminists movements made it so that not all women are bound to the laws associated with femininity.
  • Hmmm...it is not dead in my neighborhood. Standing up for yourself and expecting equal pay for equal work is gender-neutral. Aspiring to be the best you can be and following your dreams (even if they involve professions that are thought of as "male") is gender neutral. Having the right to vote is gender neutral. What is it about feminism exactly that makes you think it has single-handedly destroyed the "girly girl" in us? Happy Tuesday! :)
  • because theres always that one person that has to take it to the extream >.>
  • Femininity is not gone, it's just no longer publicly portrayed. Feminism is the band-aid for what femininity seeks to be: submissive to males who won't abuse the priveledge of a womans' respect. All else is sociological learned trash bunk that's been fed and regurgitated to be the norm of today.
  • It didn't, femininity is a personality trait that anybody can choose to hold. However, if femininity was "killed" it wouldn't be a terrible thing, because femininity itself it a socially prescribed role, forced - both consciously and unconsciously - onto girls, from their parents, peers, and the media. http://web2.iadfw.net/ktrig246/out_of_cave/mf.html http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/07/world/asia/07cnd-thai.html?_r=1&ex=1188100800&en=dbacf1127625895f&ei=5070
  • I see lots of feminine women and none are dead. :-) I disagree with the premise of this question.
  • Because they got tired of getting their hubbies their damn beer.
  • It didn't. There are plenty of women who are quite feminine, yet possess a strength and mind of a feminist.
  • Did it? Define femininity and show evidence that feminism killed it. I know quite a few very feminine women - and a few men.
  • First, I think that's a sweeping generalization. Second, I think there's some confusion between feminism and feminine. Feminism is an organized movement advocating social, political and all other rights equal to men. One can still be a strong woman who believes in equal rights, and still be feminine.
  • Feminists killed femininity by rejecting it as a ploy of the patriarchy to keep women down. Dworkin was a prototypical man-hating feminist, and one of their most famous leaders and role models.
  • That´s what I wonder too. Although I do agree with feminists about some issues,I truly dislike the feminist fanatism. I love feminity. I think feminity is a wonderful part of being a woman. Why so many women want to be like men? We are different than men, that´s a fact. And different dosen´t mean less valuable.
  • I don't think it has. Feminists campaigning hard for equal rights and protection from abuse have to make their voices heard, and aren't seen as being very feminine, but I'd rather they did fight. I can still be a girly girl when I want.

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