ANSWERS: 8
  • G'day Abbie915, Thank you for your question. Holy Saturday is the traditional end of Lent in most traditions. While the Catholic Church considers that Holy Thursday is the official end of Lent, you are expected to continue to sacrifice up until Sunday. You can therefore start doing something again that you gave up for lent on Easter Sunday. Personally, I have been getting stuck into the Easter Eggs. I have attached sources for your reference. Regards References Wikipedia Lent http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lent Liturgical season http://www.anglicancatholic.org/dmas/litdescp.html The season of lent http://www.kencollins.com/holy-04.htm Catholic Church http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/09152a.htm
  • In my family, we can start eating/doing whatever it was again on the Easter Sunday.
  • I've always thought it was when you celebrated Easter. If you go to Easter Vigil (Saturday night), instead of Sunday morning, I guess you could start after that service. If not, after the Sunday morning Easter service.
  • The Catholic Church does not mandate giving anything up, so that you could eat "forbidden" foods at any time. But what I think you mean is: when does Lent end? Lent ends at the beginning of Holy (or Maundy) Thursday Mass. So if you have given up candy, you could eat candy that night. You could even eat during Mass if you had no plans for Communion (although that would be unspeakably tacky, to say the least). However, Good Friday has its own rules which include abstinence from meat and fasting, which itself means that you can't eat between meals AND the three meals must have smaller than usual portions (which add up to no more than two usual meals). So you could eat candy on Friday as long as you had it as a meal. Eating it with a meal (as if it was dessert) would add up to a full meal which is not permitted. On Saturday, you can let your hair down and do what you like. Although this answer may seem whimsical, it complies with canonical law, as far as I know.
  • The Catholic Church does not mandate giving anything up, so that you could eat "forbidden" foods at any time. But what I think you mean is: when does Lent end? Lent ends at the beginning of Holy (or Maundy) Thursday Mass. So if you have given up candy, you could eat candy that night. You could even eat during Mass if you had no plans for Communion (although that would be unspeakably tacky, to say the least). However, Good Friday has its own rules which include abstinence from meat and fasting, which itself means that you can't eat between meals AND the three meals must have smaller than usual portions (which add up to no more than two usual meals). So you could eat candy on Friday as long as you had it as a meal. Eating it with a meal (as if it was dessert) would add up to a full meal which is not permitted. On Saturday, you can let your hair down and do what you like. Why? Because the three days preceding Easter are the Paschal Triduum, which is its own (really short) liturgical season. Although this answer may seem whimsical, it complies with canonical law, as far as I know.
  • The Catholic Church does not mandate giving anything up, so that you could eat "forbidden" foods at any time. But what I think you mean is: when does Lent end? Lent ends at the beginning of Holy (or Maundy) Thursday Mass. So if you have given up candy, you could eat candy that night. You could even eat during Mass if you had no plans for Communion (although that would be unspeakably tacky, to say the least). However, Good Friday has its own rules which include abstinence from meat and fasting, which itself means that you can't eat between meals AND the three meals must have smaller than usual portions (which add up to no more than two usual meals). So you could eat candy on Friday as long as you had it as a meal. Eating it with a meal (as if it was dessert) would add up to a full meal which is not permitted. On Saturday, you can let your hair down and do what you like. Why? Because the three days preceding Easter are the Paschal Triduum, which is its own (really short) liturgical season. Although this answer may seem whimsical, it complies with canonical law, as far as I know.
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  • When you want to....

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