ANSWERS: 27
  • Why, has another one been lost?
  • There are millions of stars that we know about. What do you mean "sun?"
  • Lots of them, they're called stars.
  • no the only star in our galaxy named Sun is the center of our solar system
  • When you wish upon a star..........
  • Plenty of suns in the Universe. All stars are Suns. We have several Suns within our own Galaxy - Milkyway .
  • I don't think so, the sun is because we worship it as it gives us life. If there is infact another "sun" then we have not found it yet as we have not found life.;0)
  • Sun is nothing but a star.There are numerous other stars like our sun.
  • No I dont think so :)
  • Yes-- the sun is a star. There are several hundred billion stars just in our own galaxy.
  • There are countless star out there in deep space just like our sun
  • For whatever reason, we named the STAR closest to us the Sun. If you glance outside right now, you should see an innumerable amount of stars outside.
  • Many stars like our sun have been found . Most stars, including the sun, are "main sequence stars," fueled by nuclear fusion converting hydrogen into helium. The sun is a class G yellow dwarf. The star Capella is just like the sun
  • may so many of the news channels are publihed that there is another sun in the universe. so i also want confirmation about this
  • Of course. Every star is a 'sun'.
  • Lots and lots and lots.
  • There are vast numbers of other stars in vast numbers of of other galaxies as well as many billions of stars in our own galaxy ... a significant number of these other stars are also class "G" solar stars, very similar to our sun. http://www.angelfire.com/realm/shades/horoscopes/astar.htm .
  • Yes, suns are found throughout our galaxy, as well as the rest of the universe.
  • yes. We just chose to call the one closest to ours the Sun, and to worship it, and have religions used nowadays based off the old worship of "the son"/the sun
  • Every star you gaze at in the night sky is a Sun.
  • Some 'suns' have been discovered to have planets orbiting them. Not only that, recently one planet orbiting a nearby star has actually been photographed. http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap081128.html
  • Our star "The Sun" is the most common type it's nothing special, just our planet is.
  • sun is a Star. there are many such stars similar to sun are found in universe.
  • There are many of them!
  • Every star in every galaxy of this universe is a sun. Many of the stars are actually yellow dwarf stars like our sun. Your question is a bit like saying: Are there other leaves in the rainforest?
  • It has been realized that the sun is just another star, the particularity of which is that it is the star of which our home planet, the Earth, is a satellite. "While it is debatable when the Solar System was truly "discovered," three 19th century observations determined its nature and place in the universe beyond reasonable doubt. First, in 1838, Friedrich Bessel successfully measured a stellar parallax, an apparent shift in the position of a star created by the Earth's motion around the Sun. This was not only the first direct, experimental proof of heliocentrism, but also revealed, for the first time, the vast distance between our Solar System and the stars. Then, in 1859, Robert Bunsen and Gustav Kirchhoff, using the newly invented spectroscope, examined the spectral signature of the Sun and discovered that it was composed of the same elements as existed on Earth, establishing for the first time a physical link between the Earth and the heavens. Then, Father Angelo Secchi compared the spectral signature of the Sun with those of other stars, and found them virtually identical. The realisation that the Sun was a star led to the hypothesis that other stars could have systems of their own, though this was not to be proven for nearly 140 years." Source and further information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discovery_and_exploration_of_the_Solar_System "Father Pietro Angelo Secchi SJ (29 June 1818 – 26 February 1878) was an Italian astronomer. He was Director of the Observatory at the Pontifical Gregorian University (then called the Roman College) for 28 years. He was a pioneer in astronomical spectroscopy, and was one of the first scientists to state authoritatively that the Sun is a star." Source and further information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angelo_Secchi
  • Aren't all the stars in the sky suns? [Sorry, it's been a long time since I was at school]

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