ANSWERS: 7
  • Rank Given Surname Branch, Retired Where: Rank = Last rank held Given = First name Surname = Last name Branch = Branch of servie (US Army, US Navy, US Marine Corps, US Air Force, US Coast Guard) Retired = self-explanatory For example: RDML. Phineas L. Richards United States Navy, Retired Of course, the rank can be written out, and the branch names and "retired" can be abbreviated (USN, Ret.), but usually aren't on such formal items.
  • I believe a simple example whether "correct" or not would be; Capt. J. Sparrow (Ret.) This in fact might become a reality soon.
  • put his name then in brackets (ret capt), truthfully oi dont see the point of keeping there rank in civi street, im forces my self very proud have to say but when i leave the forces id like to me known as miss why continue to be someone your not anymore without sounding rude all JNCO and SNCO dont put RET CPL or RET WO for example.
  • None of these are completely correct. Some are completely incorrect. Answer 3 from anonymous is the most correct: Rank Given Surname Branch, Retired Where: Rank = Last rank held Given = First name Surname = Last name Branch = Branch of service (US Army, US Navy, US Marine Corps, US Air Force, US Coast Guard) Retired = self-explanatory For example: RDML. Phineas L. Richards United States Navy, Retired The error lies in the abbreviated version which is only partly incorrect as it should be for the above example: RAdmL. Phineas L. Richards, USN (ret.) Note: Anonymous misspelled the abbreviation for Rear Admiral, in fact RADM or RAdm are both acceptable, as is RAdmL (indicating 2 star admiral lower half - the USN has no 1 star rank, but has two, 2 star ranks, upper and lower half of Rear Admiral. A one star Admiral is called a Commodore, and this is only used in time of war.) However, in using the formal method, neither the rank, nor the service should be abbreviated. So the example is most correct for the formal method as: Rear Admiral Phineas L. Richards United States Navy, Retired
  • Answer by Blind Bat is nonsense. Military rank is a title, just as is Mister, Master, Madam, or Miss. An officer's rank is in fact a commission given by the US Congress. Once a military person has retired, their rank is a permanent title. As anyone who a fifth grade education should know, the title comes first. Ex: Dr. Physician B. Medicine, MD. Or: RAdmL. Phineas L. Richards, USN (ret.) The affiliation comes last, MD for Medical Doctor or USN for United States Navy.
  • To find the correct abreviations for nearly any military rank see: http://zaxxon.freeshell.org/FanFic/The_Library/List_of_Ranks.html The only error there that I see is that the USN has no 6 star rank (Grand Admiral?), and the 5 star admiral (Fleet Admiral is reserved for time of war only - there were 7 in WWII, none since). Chief of Naval Operations is a peace time rank of the 4 star rank, Admiral. The 5 star General in the US Army is called General of the Army (reserved for time of war only - there were only 5 in WWII, and none since), not Chief of Operations. The USMC has never had a 5 star general rank. LCdr. Kevin P. Baker, USNR (ret.) son of the late great LtCol. Terrance P. Baker, USMC (ret.)
  • https://m.weddingwire.com/wedding-forums/retired-military-couples-invitation-addressing/7efba88926384683.html Captain Jane Smith, USCG (Ret.)

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