ANSWERS: 29
  • I know more about the unequality for gays then I do for anything else but it's because they don't have the same rights as me & you. I can pretty much guarantee that the gay people would give up gay day at Disney if they had equal rights like us
  • You have just hit one of my pet peeves. The company I work for boasts about being "all inclusive" because they hire minorities of all kinds. And they support the minorities by supporting the organizations for the gays, women of color, black professsionals, asians, etc. My feeling is that by having groups like these or celebrating groups as you mention does nothing but divide us rather than try to bring everyone together. Thanks for your insightful question.
  • I won't DR you for that, actually a good question! I agree that in order to move towards true equality, we need to drop all the hubbub about making sure everyone has a "special day". We should all remember our heritage every day of our lives. We should keep where we came from in our minds, but not forget where we are going either. I do find it kind of funny, that people feel the need to be called special, or get special recognition for somethings that they may not have even had a choice in. here is my suggestion: Every day, remember your roots. Remember where your ancestors came from, and all the trials and BS they had to go through so you can be where you are today. Instead of celebrating all the days separately, why not celebrate them together, in our daily lives? Instead of bickering over politcal correctness, and the need to make sure no one is offended, how about just being human beings together? Share your history, your past, and your heritage with people, and learn about other people's. You don't need a day for that. here is something else to think about. If there was "Straight Day", or "white history month" that would be an outrage to alot of people. If there was "White Entertainment Television", people would be up in arms! Let's just drop all the BS and be human together, please?
  • I don't see any reason to DR this question, because your point is valid. There is no reason to judge someone on the basis of their sexual orientation, age, sex, color, national origin or religious affiliation. If a group of people has a formal agenda, however, they have put forth a platform that is open to criticism in a free society. Not everyone who shares a particular trait belongs to a group that embraces a platform, however. The issue becomes, how do we treat people? The answer is quite simple - we treat them as individual human beings, fully vested as equal to ourselves under the law. If a group of people wishes to have special notice for whatever reason, that does not entitle that group to more rights than anyone else has. I think some groups have focused on making others aware of their existence and their cultural history, hence we have Black History Month and so on. The awareness itself is a good thing, as it validates the group as being composed of humans who, like any other group of people, have struggled, triumphed and lived to tell the story. All of our human stories are worth knowing, sharing and learning from. A person or a group has every right to put forth its story and its goals, but that does not make their story any more important than that of any other person or group of people. No one wants to be marginalized or disenfranchised. When people feel that they are not given full value as humans, one tool they can use to correct that injustice is gathering together with like-minded people to make their voice a little louder. It's a feeling of belonging somewhere, when one feels that the larger social dynamic has overlooked or deprived them of their full rights as humans.
  • Because minority celebration traces the unification of the cultural whole as founded by different cultural elements brought by different minority groups through your nation's past. The only trouble is, this doesn't gel well with the commercialism in your country. Commercialism affects cultural processes by reaffirming the mainstream - and the mainstream is more often than not turgidly traditional. So, the competing forces of social equality and commercialism have mixed in America to create a seemingly uneven system that only increases social division, and this works to the advantage of advertisers and others who get paid to manipulate people through media.
  • Lisa and Lyn's answers really make the most sense to me. I just want to add, however, that although we are 'supposed' to be equal as humans, we are not. There is still plenty of prejudice and bigotry going around. The white American heterosexual is still overwhelmingly dominant in most media, if you haven't noticed. There is nothing wrong, in my opinion, with acknowledging and celebrating the many cultures of our world.
  • The two example you give have very different reasons. Black History Month is intended to level up an inequality. Generally speaking the history of America is written in terms of the colonisation from Europe: Christopher Columbus, Pilgrim Fathers, War of Independence, Ellis Island etc., all of which are oriented towards the white(ish) proportion of the population. But blacks did not participate in any of this - and yet there are many of them and they have their own history. In terms of the way history is told, the current state is unequal because black history is ignored in favour of white. Therefore it is reasonable to have Black History Month to level up. One day, when we have a fully integrated society, it will become unnecessary. Gay Day at Disney is much simpler: a commercial appeal to an interest group. It is on the same basis as they might run a Senior Citizens Day, or a Princesses Day. People tend to like being surrounded by people like themselves - particularly those against whom prejudice may be directed. When Disney has a Gay Day, gay couples who might never consider Disney normally (in part because they will get frowned upon for holding hands etc.) may decide to go. So it is pure business, not inequality.
  • I UR-ed you actually. :) Anyway, I see it like this; The purpose of these celebrations is not to divide. The purpose of these celebrations is to foster education and awareness. Awareness of the plurality that makes up our society, and education on the history, contributions and struggles of these often marginalized groups. It's all well and good that we are all touted as being equal. But the fact of the matter is that we are not all treated equally in our society. We are not all viewed equally in this society. We are not all represented equally in this society. I'm very aware of this, being black and gay, as well as being a Buddhist with Pagan leanings. And so my personal opinion is that until this happens, such celebrations serve a useful purpose. A problem arises, though, when some in the majority culture view these celebrations as something that's in their face. Something that they lack. Something that someone else has that they don't. This is the wrong way to view these things, in my opinion. I know white people who use Black History Month as an opportunity to learn about the history and achievements of some of their fellow countrymen. I know men who see International Women's Day as an opportunity to learn about the struggles of women for equality around the world. These are people who realize that the dream of true equality only becomes realized through education and enlightenment. If these celebrations and their like become divisive, it's not because of anything inherent in the activities themselves. It's because there are misguided, knee-jerk reactions among some as to what these activities properly represent. Someone mentioned that every day is "Straight Day" and every month "White History Month." That sounds smart-assed, but it's really quite true. And as far as there being no "white" celebrations? There are. They just aren't called that. They're known by names like "Polish Heritage Day," "Greek Heritage Festival" and "National Italian American Heritage Month," all of which are celebrated in one or more states and/or municipalities throughout this country. I for one love these types of events. We may be equal, but we're not homogenous. I say taste the rainbow, baby. Oh, and speaking of rainbows. . .that Disney gay day thing? that's just savvy marketing on Disney's part. ;)
  • Often they are for a few reasons together: - To remind everyone of the past when there 'wasn't' equality - To enhance the public's understanding of such minority groups in order to ensure that the equality remains - Simply to celebrate being a member of said minority ^ Some (maybe not all) of those, and sometimes more reasons. ***** Celebrating a minority is not an act of inequality in any meaningful sense - giving that minority special benefits, or a different set of rules that gives them an advantage, etc whatever... THAT is inequality. I encourage things like 'Gay Pride' days, 'Black History Month' (or equivalent), etc, because they are a valuable tool in educating people and maintaining the equality. I AM however, against groups receiving discriminatory benefits over other ones, as has happened in the past with 'white' people getting lots of benefits and 'black' or 'Asian' people not getting anything, etc. Helping a minority in need is something very different, and shouldn't be confused with discriminatory inequality.
  • Such celebrations are not meant to further separate different cultural groups. they are meant to celebrate our diversity as well as our unity. and to also celebrate everything we have overcome. some communities, like my own (LGBT) are still harshly discriminated against, although these days people are becoming more accepting.
  • I believe the purpose of equality is to treat each culture, indeed, each person equally. It isn't supposed to homogenize everyone into a massive melting pot of sameness. By not singling out someone for "different" rules and opportunities (rules like same sex couples not being able to get health insurance for their partners or, as in the past, African Americans having to sit at the back of the bus - and opportunities such as being paid equal pay if you happen to be a woman, or worse yet, an African American woman; G-d help you if you were a transexual African American....)we are treating everyone equally. I believe we've learned much by having Black History Month. Personally, besides the tiny bits of history about the Civil War we learned nothing about any African Americans who had played a role in creating this country. I'd much prefer young people to learn about those who've had a positive impact, and I believe Black History Month addresses that. As far as Disney's Gay Day, and Gay Rights parades, I think it is a good idea. Those who would prefer not to visit Disney on that day have an opportunity to make a decision based upon scheduling, and can opt to visit at some other time. Those who are blissfully unaware of the persecutions of gay individuals have an opportunity to learn about the atrocities heaped upon that group, in many cases by criminals purporting to be quite spiritual.
  • for the minoritys to celebrate their uniqueness together and make themselves feel good...
  • What about white women over forty trying to get back in the work force..Everyone comes before us
  • Seriously do you know how many white women, that thought their life was set had kids had a home and their hubbies decided after 20 some odd years they needed to find themselves...You go to school you do great but unless you are bilingual, a minority or gay you can't get a job who's the minority....
  • It would be nice if we all treated each other equally, but it has yet to happen. Black history is barely represented in America's schools; instead of Black History Month, black history should be taught thoroughly in our schools. The LGBT community is still discriminated against in America, as are people of color, women, etc. True equality will likely never exist in a capitalist society where the "default" is white, protestant Christian, male. Thus, Gay Days, Black History Month, etc.
  • I want an dumped after the best years of your life parade...and I want all bimbos to be dragged under the float..not really just venting
  • We are not supposed to single out any group as being inferior, "less than" or unworthy. There is no reason to refrain from celebrating things as a family, as a nation or as a religion..Christians "celebrate" Christmas..Irish people celebrate St. Patrick's Day..in so doing, you are not "putting down" others, you are celebrating things that are unique to who you are! :)
  • I live in California I say your survey is Bull
  • I am bisexual and have been with my girlfriend for almost 3 years and I can't stand the whole gay day thing. Not that I think its stupid or pointless. I do not care what others think of me. Its nice that they offer stuff like that, but we shouldn't have too. Because we all should be comfortable or just not care about other people's lifestyles. I feel everyone should be treated equal. Which is why don't we just get rid of Black History Month and everything, and have a, Be United Day or something that doesn't just take a single group of people, but everyone. Or just get rid of it all.
  • Because most of the people you are referring to live their life behind bars.They have to be invisible,they have to be satisfied with less achievement in some places and having Black History Month and Gay Day in Disneyland are the highlights when they can take a deep breath.Saying it as a white,straight woman.
  • Any action singled out due to race, religion, sex and creed is anticonstitutional if supported by our government here in the U.S.
  • its a good question. i think your view of equality is one we all should have. but if our society portrayed it it wouldnt even be an issue. whats wrong with celebrating ones heritage? i feel in school and society the celebration of eurocentricity is the norm so thats why people of other mindsets celebrate their heritages. ask urself this: what does a perfect woman look like how long is her hair what is the perfect skin tone is it better to be catholic, jewish, or muslum truth is we all are equal as humans- but the world and society wont untill we mix so much there is no difference....... which is a long way off! everybody had good responses to this question i think.
  • I know that everyone is equal and that there is no group that is better than the next, and I believe that most people feel the same to a certain degree. But in a world where we practice what we preach, there would also be no hungry children, no murder or wars, and everyone in need of medical help could get it. We don't live in that world and i'll dare to say that if you're white, you may not ever understand that EVERYDAY is white history day. And if you're straight you may not know that EVERYDAY is straight day.
  • Disney has a gay day? WTF? I didn't get a letter about that one. Is that why everyone kept wanting to ride the tea-cups with me? I thought it was a little butch when I went but that might explain a few things. I had never seen Mickey in black leather and studs before. I also found it wierd that Donald was on a leash instead of Pluto. I think I am gonna think twice next time someone asks me if I want to be an honarary fairy because tinkerbell is out for the day.
  • I THINK SPECIFIC DAYS AND MONTHS ISN'T TRYING TO EXCLUDE ANYONE. IT'S A THING FOR EVERYONE TO SUPPORT NO MATTER WHAT RACE, SEX, OR SEXUALITY YOU ARE. IT'S JUST SHOWING THAT PEOPLE ARE ACCEPTED FOR BEING A DIFFERENT RACE, GENDER, OR SEXUALITY.
  • you shouldn't be DR-ed for this. But the purpose is because b.c back then no one was equal to one another from ranks to race the point of Gay day, black history etc. is just people celebrating how far we've come from then to now. its just people celebrating their history.
  • 1. Equality does not mean everyone is or is supposed to be the same. 2. The purpose of equality has nothing to do with NOT singling out any group. Equality in a political context simply means that all men stand equal before the law - specifically: - There isn't one law (and punishment) for one class of people, and another law (and punishment) for another class of people. - There are no hereditary privaleges or encumberences such as an hereditary right to a tax-supported pension, or an hereditary right to hold a post in the government, a seat in the legislature, or a place on the bench -- and similarly an hereditary obligation such as serfdom or slavery. It also means that certain opportunities aren't LEGALLY reserved for people of a certain class, nor LEGALLY closed to those of a certain class. Equality - as understood by the Founders and Framers - means the end to an Aristocracy and its replacement by a combined Plutocracy and Meritocracy, where people could rise or fall as far as their wit and wealth could carry them in a free market of open competition without interference and artificial barriers (laws) enacted and enforced by a government. "Society" could put up whatever social barriers it wanted, but the law was required to stay out of it. In other words, just as a market is free to buy or not buy someones goods for whatever reason, no matter how irrational, it also free to "buy" (select/hire/elect/appoint/advance/promote) people as it sees fit, and with no state mandates directing this selection process on the basis of membership in a class, i.e., there's nothing wrong with "minority celebrations" at least on this issue. Government quotas and equal opportunity laws, however, are completely antithetical to the principle of equality before the law. "Social Justice" is just an obfuscation for statist despotism.
  • To get people to understand minoirites are equal as the majoritiy and have accomplish great things like them something school textbooks leave it most of the time.
  • I can't believe Disney has a gay day....that shit's so gay. Also DRed???? What is that, is that like when your passage gets torn down?

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