ANSWERS: 12
  • No, that's fictional.
  • 1) "Antonio "Tony" Montana "Scarface" is a fictional character in the Brian DePalma film Scarface, portrayed by Al Pacino. Oliver Stone came up with the name by combining the last name of his then-favourite football player (Joe Montana) and the first name from the main character of the 1932 film Scarface: The Shame of a Nation, played by Paul Muni." Source and further information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Montana 2) About the 1932 film: "Scarface (also known as Scarface: the Shame of the Nation and The Shame of a Nation) is a 1932 film noir of the Pre-Code era which tells the story of gang warfare and police intervention when rival gangs fight over control of a city. It stars Paul Muni, Ann Dvorak, Karen Morley, Osgood Perkins, C. Henry Gordon, George Raft, Vince Barnett, Edwin Maxwell, and Boris Karloff. It was directed by Howard Hawks and produced by Howard Hughes." "The movie was adapted by Ben Hecht, Fred Pasley, (uncredited), Seton I. Miller, John Lee Mahin, W.R. Burnett and Howard Hawks (uncredited) from the novel Scarface by Armitage Trail. The film is loosely based upon the life of Al Capone (whose nickname was "Scarface"). Capone was rumored to have liked the film so much that he had his own copy of it." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarface_%281932_film%29 3) About the 1983 film: "Scarface is a 1983 film directed by Brian De Palma, written by Oliver Stone and starring Al Pacino as Antonio "Tony" Montana. A loose remake of the 1932 Howard Hawks gangster film of the same title, it tells the story of a fictional Cuban refugee who comes to Florida in 1980 as a result of the Mariel Boatlift. Tony becomes a gangster against the backdrop of the 1980s cocaine boom. The film chronicles his rise to the top of Miami's criminal underworld and subsequent downfall in Greek tragedy fashion. The film is dedicated to Howard Hawks and Ben Hecht, who were the writers of the original Scarface." http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarface_%281983%29 4) About the 2006 computer game: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarface:_The_World_Is_Yours
  • i think the cubans going over to america was real - and the events of the time were real - just not tony montana.
  • it was real inn my heart but not in real life
  • http://www.encyclomedia.com/video-tony_spilotro.html in this link the very real living legend Tony Montana comments about Tony Spilotro,Mobster. So there you go! =)
  • scarface is based on the life and corruption of the infamous Al Capone who was called scarface after he got slashed by a boyfriend of a girl.
  • Scareface was "based" on a real person. Remember its the true story according to Hollyweird. Believe about 2% of the story and you'll be about right.
  • REAL LIFE STORY BEHIND THE MOVIE "SCARFACE" Written by Boris F. Pallominy The movie “Scarface” with Al Pacino, and directed by Brian DePalma, is based on a true story that took place, and was still evolving about the time the movie was shot. This story is very violent, and started a couple of years earlier, with characters both in the USA and in Bolivia, which crossed the borders back and forth in the commission of their crimes, and later in life when they had to run from the law. The actual story is more complicated and interesting than what one sees in the movie “Scarface”. Everything started in Bolivia in July 1980, with a violent coup d'etat by the extreme "right wing" members of the Bolivian Military who were not satisfied with the civilian government at the time. The right-wing military officers involved in the coup d'etat were headed by General Luis Garcia Meza Tejada. This group of Bolivian Military high-ranking Officers first pressured the then lawfully elected President of Bolivia, Lydia Gueiller Tejada, to appoint General García Meza as Commander in Chief of the entire Bolivian Army. Few months later, a military "Junta" was formed. A military Junta is a powerful body composed of all the country's Military Generals coming together to decide over national matters without the participation of the civilian government; The history of the Junta is that it was created in times of distress or when the civilian government was abusing its power or conducting unlawful acts against the people of the country. The Junta created then in Bolivia was unlawful in itself, since there was no distress in the country and the civilian government was not committing any abuses over the people. The Junta headed by Garcia Meza was created with the purpose of taking over power by force, and it is know that money for the Junta’s activities came from illicit sources. Anyway, the "Junta," headed by General Luis Garcia Meza, forced a violent Coup d'etat, sometimes referred to as the "Cocaine Coup" in July 17 1980 (wikipedia.org), this coup d’etat put General Garcia Meza on the top of the pyramid and granted unlimited authority without civilian approval. As stated earlier, months before Garcia Meza's coup d'etat, the right-wing military refused to surrender their absolute power, especially after been in government dictatorships for so long, before the people of Bolivia decided to go back to democracy. Additionally, much of the officers involved in this coup d'etat, were the same officers involved in the General Hugo Banzer Suarez's dictatorship of the early 1970's. These officers also felt the pressure to re-take power from the civilian government due to the increasing pressure to investigate the economic and human right abuses committed by them while in power (wikipedia.org). Once Garcia Meza took over power by force, he named the then Army Colonel Luis Arce Gomez, as his Minister of the Interior, and gave him unlimited powers over life and death of the Bolivian citizens. Arce Gomez, is actually portrayed in the Scarface movie as one of the associates of Tony Montana's powerful cocaine supplier Alejandro Sosa. Furthermore, in the scene where Sosa seeks Montana's help to get rid of a political adversary in Washington DC, the president of Bolivia's name is mentioned as one of Sosa’s co-associates, but of course, the name is changed from Army General Luis Garcia Meza, the real name of the cocaine Bolivian President, to General Cucombre. Additionally, the reason why Sosa wants Montana to help him, is to prevent the speech of a Bolivian political activist, who went to New York to speak in front of the United Nations to get help to destitute Garcia Meza from power. This episode is real, and the video shown by Sosa in his Bolivian mansion to Montana, and his other high-ranking government associates, is a real documentary aired in CBS’s “60 minutes.” In the documentary, this Bolivian political activist, denounces the involvement of the Bolivian government in drug trafficking activities, and names with all the letters, all three players in the cocaine trafficking from Bolivia to the USA: · Bolivian President General Luis Garcia Meza, · Bolivian Minister of the Interior Colonel Luis Arce Gomez, and · drug lord Bolivian entrepreneur Roberto Suarez Gomez, “the King of Cocaine”. Furthermore, the character of Alejandro Sosa in the movie, is based on a real-life Bolivian drug lord, Mr. Roberto Suarez, “the King of Cocaine." For more information on Roberto Suarez Gomez, go to the following link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roberto_Su%C3%A1rez_Gom%C3%A9z Roberto Suarez Gomez, established connections and deals with both, General Garcia Meza and Colonel Luis Arce Gomez, "the minister of Cocaine," to get protection for his drug trafficking activities, which included production of cocaine in Bolivia, and exportation of cocaine to the USA. It is estimated that Roberto Suarez Gomez made an average of six hundred million dollars a year, in 1980's dollars, some 1500 million dollars a year in today's dollars. Roberto Suarez Gomez was so filthy rich and cocky, that he contacted both presidents, President Ronald Reagan of the USA, and the then president of Bolivia in 1983, and offered to pay off the entire Bolivian International debt in one payment, in exchange for immunity for his drug-trafficking activities in the USA and Bolivia (wikipedia.org). At the time, the Bolivian International Debt was 3 billion dollars, 1980's dollars. Nobody knows what ever happened with this offer. At the end, the fictional character Alejandro Sosa from the movie, looks like a poor drug dealer when compared to Roberto Suarez Gomez, the King of Cocaine, who is actually the one who started the Pablo Escobar saga, since Suarez Gomez made Pablo Escobar from a street level dealer, into what he became after Roberto Suarez stepped down of the business due to family and legal problems in Bolivia and the USA. Finally, it is calculated that about 1000 people in Bolivia, and about 450 people in Miami, USA and in Colombia, lost their lives as a direct result of the deals and connections of these nefarious Bolivian strong men: Luis Garcia Meza, Luis Arce Gomez, and Roberto Suarez Gomez. The Garcia Meza dictatorship was short-lived, only held the country’s government for 13 months, before Garcia Meza was forced to turn over power to yet another Army General, Celso Torrelio Villa, in August 3, 1981. Regardless of its length in power, the Garcia Meza dictatorship has left a profound mark in the Bolivian history and in the minds of the Bolivian and the USA people, not only because of the violence and civil rights abuse, but also because it created a stage in the history of both counties, deeply marked by money, corruption, abuse, drugs, libertinage, street violence, and the wrong way of pursuing the American Dream. For more information on General Luis Garcia Meza, go to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luis_Arce_G%C3%B3mez So when you ask if Scarface, the movie is based in real life, I have to say that unfortunately yes, and add that what happened in real life is way worst than what you see in the movie. If you have any questions, e-mail me at: pallominy@msn.com REFERENCES WWW.WIKIPEDIA.ORG
  • I dunno. But his "little friend" was! ;-)
  • It sounds like we know the same persons
  • Re you an attractive person?
  • No it was fiction although the Mariel boatlift was a real event.

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