ANSWERS: 14
  • The more poular, well known version of this is "I see, said the blind man, to his deaf dog, and he picked up his hammer and saw" This is an example of a Wellerism. Wellerisms got their name from the Charles Dickens' "The Pickwick Papers." Sam Weller, Mr. Pickwick's good-natured servant, and his father had a habit of following a well-known saying or phrase with some kind of phrase that implied humor, irony, or a pun. In this circumstance, the phrase "i see" has a double meaning, in that by "I see" , the blind man doesn't "see" anything with his eyes, but rather simply means "I understand". The extra bit about saying something (whether it is directed at his deaf dog, wife, daughter, brother, man, etc) to one who is deaf, is pointless and adds a little humor to the phrase. The other bit on the end is just more of the same "As he picked up his hammer and saw" wouldn't be nearly as funny if it were stated "as he picked up his hammer and cutting tool" These "wellerisms" were quite popular years ago, and have been around for 150 years, as have been another variant of the wellerism, the Tom Swifty. Here's some examples of Tom Swifties: "I need a pencil sharpener," said Tom bluntly. "Oops! There goes my hat!" said Tom off the top of his head. "I have a split personality," said Tom, being frank. "This must be an aerobics class," Tom worked out.
  • : : "I see," said the blind man. : "You've been stung!" she said waspishly. : "I know!" I cried hurtfully. : "You're out of tune," he said sharply. : "I didn't meant it," she said accidentally. : "Even so, it won't do," he said flatly. : "I'll be all right," she replied naturally. "I see" said the blind man to his deaf daughter as he picked up his hammer and saw. "The prisoners are going over the prison wall," he said condescendingly. http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/26/messages/445.html http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/22/messages/780.html "Ok, I see" sez the blindman. http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/11/messages/733.html
  • It is meant to have some humour as one expresses understanding: I see, said the blind man to his deaf wife, who sat at the corner of the round table. And he picked up his hammer and saw.
  • Actually its not a phrase..but a joke..google it..its funny
  • I see said the blind man who picked up his saw to cut off a tree branch.
  • "I see" said the blind man. And the deaf man said "Huh?" I use this expression whenever understanding dawns on me,...especially if I needed a lengthy explanation on a particular subject.
  • I would always say: "I see said the blind man to his deaf dog sitting in the corner of a circular room" I've been saying that since I was 12 when I first heard my mom say it.
  • It means the same as the Blind leading the blind. One person who does not know what they are doing telling another person what to do.
  • I use it to mean what you just said is as Clear as mud.
  • Let me give you an example: The Democrats claim that the Republicans have sent us to hell. The Republicans deny and accuse the Democrats of having sent us to hell. The Democrats, of course, deny it
  • I think it's wrong. I've heard two versions: 1) "'I see' said the blind man to his deaf son." 2) "'I see' said the blind man as he picked up his hammer and saw."
  • i see said the blind man to his deaf wife its as clear as mud is said when you dont understand something
  • I see said the blind man peeing in the wind it's all coming back to now
  • "I see, said the blind man English - Alternative forms: “I see” said the blind man I see, said the blind man as he picked up his hammer and saw I see, said the blind man, as he picked up his hammer and saw I see, said the blind man to his deaf wife I see, said the blind man to his deaf wife as his crippled son ran up the stairs I see, said the blind man to the deaf man as the lame man walked by I see, said the blind man when he couldn’t not see at all I see, said the blind man who could not see at all I see, said the blind man who didn’t see at all - Etymology: USA, about 1860 - Phrase: I see, said the blind man (idiomatic) Said to express confusion." Source and further information: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/I_see,_said_the_blind_man

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