ANSWERS: 3
  • My mom said the more you curse them the hotter they'll be. But then again she was mentally damaged after getting hit by a car so I wouldn't put too much stock in that! And I doubt it works with sweet peppers . What kind of peppers are you growing? I've grown a few habanero pepper plants in the past, when I had space. Did you plant them from seeds? Did you buy small plants or did they volunteer? That miracle gro seed starter is great! But its kind of expensive. If you bought plants they will be well fertilized and have instructions on how your plant grows best. If you just threw some seeds in the ground you might need to fertilize. All plants need sunlight and water, of course. Just keep in mind its a learning process and your first few attempts probably won't produce much, but its very rewarding to grow what you eat and nurture and care for another living thing.
    • Linda Joy
      Here is a complete video guide on how to grow peppers from seed to harvest: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcZh0_c8_Dg
    • arcticpup22
      I know plants are so cool. It's like a new thing for me. When I don't want to get up in the morning I just think of my plant and it's motivation. I have a connection with my pepper plant. It's a capsicum annum. Anaheim chili pepper. ...sorry about your moms.
    • Linda Joy
      here is some more specific information on the Anaheim chili: Light requirements: Full sun. Planting: Space 12 to 48 inches apart, depending on type. (See information above for specific recommendations.) Soil requirements: Peppers need well-drained, nutrient-rich soil. Amend soil with 3 to 5 inches of compost or other organic matter prior to planting. Soil pH should be 6.2 to 7.0. Water requirements: Keep soil consistently moist throughout the growing season. Mulch soil to reduce water evaporation. Frost-fighting plan: Pepper is a hot-weather crop. A light frost will damage plants (28? F to 32? F), and temps below 55? F slow growth and cause leaves to look yellowish. If a surprise late spring frost is in the forecast, protect newly planted seedlings with a frost blanket. Common issues: Plants drop flowers when daytime temps soar above 90? F. Few pests bother peppers, but keep an eye out for aphids, slugs, pill bugs, and leafminers. Humid weather (especially in gardens with heavy soil that doesn?t drain well) can invite fungal diseases like leafspot. Harvesting: Check image on plant tag (or at the top of this page) to learn what your pepper looks like when mature. Some peppers turn red, yellow, or other colors at maturity. Others are ready in the green stage, but will turn red if left on plants. Use pruning shears or a sharp knife to cut peppers with a short stub of stem attached. Pulling peppers by hand can cause entire branches to break off. Fruits store longer for fresh use if you don?t remove the stem, which can create an open wound that?s ripe for spoiling. Storage: Store unwashed (or washed and dried) peppers in the refrigerator in a loosely closed plastic bag. Moisture is a pepper?s enemy and hastens spoiling. For peak flavor and nutrition, use within a week. https://bonnieplants.com/product/anaheim-hot-pepper/
    • Linda Joy
      Are you growing them outside or in pots?
    • arcticpup22
      Inside I n a little drainage container. Though I might have to rethink my strategy. Thanks. I'll eventually transplant them into pots. Do I water them everyday?
  • I had great luck with peppers in the past. I have planted birdseye peppers, Thai chilis, habeneros, and ornamental peppers. My first attempt at habeneros was a bust, though. I thought animals wouldn't bother eating the fruit, so I didn't put much thought into protecting them. I was wrong, and ended up with some very irritated squirrels.
  • just water thern good and give thern plenty of sunshine

Copyright 2018, Wired Ivy, LLC

Answerbag | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy