ANSWERS: 3
  • when it stops storming around here, tired of it hailing like that
  • Knowing that it takes more fossil fuels and electricity to build that Tesla than a regular Chevy.
    • Roaring
      Keep going Archie, that's just part one.. Once the cars are produced the Chevy and other ICE's has one option in fuel: Burning a liquid or gas fuel with some emissions out of the tailpipe. Contrast that to the one time production of a battery pack, and ever increasing clean renewable sources of electrical generation. The greatest inertia in this inevitable transition are the profit infrastructures and their investors centered around the burning of fossil fuels.. Here's a look at the factors over the life of the ev and ice car. https://blog.ucsusa.org/rachael-nealer/gasoline-vs-electric-global-warming-emissions-953 .....EV's are here to stay and Tesla is blowing away the competition in both worlds.
    • mushroom
      The battery packs are also recycled when they're turn in for replacement. If you have a old rechargeable batteries from cameras or phones, most Home Depots have a bin to recycle those as well.
    • Archie Bunker
      You understand the amounts of electricity in the US that comes from coal plants, right? How are you going to get your electric car recharged if not for all those coal plants? The US Department of Energy study - "...hybrids require more energy to produce than conventional cars, emitting more greenhouse gases and burning more fossil fuels during the manufacturing process." And the batteries require much more energy to produce. A Swiss study showed that Tesla released just as much as CO2 during the PRODUCTION of the battery than in 8 years of driving a regular car. Needless to say, I'm not convinced I should give up my Navigator.
    • Roaring
      Electricity production here and around the world is transitioning toward solar & wind and other cleaner forms of electricity production. Tesls's commitment as a company to renewable energy is evident in their battery factory called Gigafactory which will eventually generate through solar 100% of the energy the facility needs to make their batteries. On the other hand besides the 6 ton yearly per ice car per year for the life of the car, the petroleum extraction, transport, refining and delivery, not to mention the higher cost to operate per mile will in the next 5 years the ice vehicles will become less and less practical.
    • Archie Bunker
      I'm sorry to say, Roaring, but electricity production is NOT transitions towards solar & wind. A few spots here and there is not "transitioning." Solar and wind generators that we have now are too expensive and don't produce nearly enough electricity that we need. I could go in to all the steel, aluminum and everything else that is used to make solar & wind turbines and the power used to make them, but I won't. And I think if you look at the amount of regular cars sold the amount of "clean" cars sold, I think you'll find that regular cars will still be going strong in 20 years, let alone 5.
  • Every once in awhile I will see a 68 Cougar. My best friend had one, I had one, and my brother had a '67, when we were all just out of high school. I love muscle cars, and seeing the old Cougars takes me back to 1980 and cruising the strip on Fremont Blvd. every weekend. Good times.

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