ANSWERS: 42
  • I don't see why not. The interview is really for BOTH of you. You may not like what you see and hear. So, the decision goes both ways.
  • Yes--I had to do that recently. Sometimes it just doesn't work out. Just be polite and clear when you respond to them and it'll all be cool.
  • Yes...i had 3 at once and turned down 2, nice to be the one who turns them down instead of being rejected :)
  • Of course it is. An Interview is just as much for you to see if you like the company as it is for an employer to make a judgement on you
  • Absolutely. Just do it right away as soon as you're sure you don't want it, so they have a chance to offer it to someone else as soon as possible.
  • Yah , thats ok. Its a good learning experience cause you may still learn some useful stuff at the interviews that you can use elsewhere. I gave you 1 pt i.e. 5 pts to 6 pts
  • Of course it is ok, there is no law saying you have to accept any job or position that you are offered.
  • Yes, Your goal in any interview is to get them to make you an offer....Then the ball is in your court. It's more than OK; it's expected.
  • Yes, of course. It may not be the right job for you. You may have already taken another job. You may not want to work at that place. There are a number of reasons to turn down a job. Just don't burn your bridges when you do turn it down. What isn't right for you today may be a godsend tomorrow.
  • Yes. But it would not be fair to go to an interview if you were sure that you are not interested.
  • yes, but if you aren't for sure going to turn it down, i wouldn't tell them in that interview! contact them later.
  • Of course. Some jobs sound great on paper, but when you see conditions of the workplace or who you will be working with, you might decide this is not for you.
  • Of course. It works both ways, doesn't it?
  • It is. I went for an interview as a cashier for a petrol station. he started critising changes and gaps in my CV and said well they are not very good are they and generally had a bad attitude. A few days later I had found something else, and so when e phoned to say I was the only person that wanted the job, I told him politely where to put the job.
  • Actually it shows character that you could stand up for your beliefs and that this job was below your moral standards shows that you are a discriminating person who doesn't take the next nugget off the job line. No! You get the correct job rather than suffer with the wrong job that pays well but satisfies nil. I'm still in the hunt. I know what all of you are going through and then some. Hang in there and keep "chipping away" as the saying goes. Be that squeaky wheel until you get the grease of employment. Persistency really does pay off.
  • Absolutely, actually the coolest thing is when a couple of companies want you so bad they start bidding on you and upping the offers to get you.
  • This is a great question. Somehow people get the idea that an interview is when an interviewer has all the power and you have to take whatever they give you... Heres the truth. When you are job hunting its like looking for an apartment. You are going to see a bunch of different ones that you pass on before you get to the one you want. If you don't like it, be polite, but be willing to admit that the job isnt what you are looking for. The interviewer will actually appreciate it becuase he doesnt have to use his time with a follow up later. Heres the other thing. When you go to an interview, you are there to interview them for the position as your boss. Have some questions for them and make more while you talk. Tell the interviewer what you expect of a boss. This might seem aggressive but its all about finding a job that will be a good fit for you.... Good luck in your job search...
  • Yes it it like me I didn't get where I am by accepting every job that came my way.
  • Sure, Ive done that quite a few times. Its good to keep your interview skills up. But...make sure you seem like you really want the job but had to turn it down do a better offer or something else.
  • If you think it doesn't meet your minimum requirements re: salary/working conditions/job expectations etc, yes you can. However, if the company is one of the top 10 in the industry, it would pay to be graceful in declining and leave an option to re-apply in the future, who knows conditions might be favourable later on or an opening for another job category, which you may qualify later...
  • An interview works both ways - you are both parties evaluating your possible future with the other in a professional relationship. You have a right to make a choice just as the potential employer does, so feel free to exercise the right.
  • Sure it is. If you don't feel the job is a right fit for you, you can turn it down. It happens all the time. Remember though, sometimes what you think isn't the right thing could be. My sister took a job she didn't want 15 years ago and is still very happy there!
  • but of course, it is your decision if you actually want to take the job. if after the interview the job isn't in your best interest, i would thank the interviewer and let them know you are no longer interested in the position, politely of course.
  • Absolutely! If it is not a good fit for yourself, then it is okay to turn the job down. It saves you time and it saves the employer time.
  • Yes. But make sure to send a note or a letter if they offered you a job, to signify your refusal to take the job. Usually, interview is not the final step in job applications. In some cases, it is only the second step of the application. Just make sure to write a formal letter if you decide not to take the job when they offer a position to you.
  • Yup. I happen to use multiple job offers to my advantage and leverage them against one another to get a higher starting pay
  • if the offer isn't that good, i guess it's youre right to turn it down
  • ohhh yaa... in fact that might be a better way to tell them you wanted a little more than what they wanted to pay... if you can do without the job for a while it is a great way to get your shoe on the other side of the door... but these days they might stick with the lesser candidate that will work for half
  • Of course. An interview is just a fact-finding mission ... no guarantees on either part.
  • of course....you are offering a service for pay...if you don't want to perform that service you don't have to...
  • You mean for a living?
  • Of course! Want to impress the hell outta someone? Send the person who interviewed you a letter outlining some things the organization can do to save and/or make money, and then turn down the job. Drives 'em CRAZY! LOL!
  • Of course it is. Would you rather be stuck in a job where you wouldn't be happy? The company wouldn't want an unhappy person working for them, either.
  • Why. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .not?
  • Yes it it ok, as long as you don't lead the perspective employer waiting for your response.
  • In most situations, yes. It is NOT ok, however to have a company fly to to visit them, have them take you out to dinner, and have them offer you a job, IF you had already decided you would not take the job.
  • Of course. You are *both* interviewing. You for the job and them for the employee. It's show business not show friends.
  • Sure. Most places won't tell you the actual salary/pay or benefits until you've interviewed. They decide, based on your experience (resume and interview) and how well they think you'll "fit in". If the pay is not at least the same as you are getting now, or doesn't fall within certain guidelines (for example, I'm on SS Disability. I NEED to get at least enough to cover that, AND benefits or, as part-time, less than what will affect it) then, usually you CAN'T accept the job. But in today's economy, MAKE SURE it's not something you could/should do for a while, until it picks back up. Remember that at this point, almost ANYTHING will look good on your resume, and especially if it's a position that is in your field. By the same token, in a good economy, negotiation will allow you to ask for what you need (monetarily- and benefits-wise). But, right now, they may not be willing to pay it, since they can find plenty of bodies willing to do the work.
  • Sure why not?
  • Youo bet it is!! I was offered a security job at Free Meyer (Since bought out by Kroger's) and the job paid the whopping sum of $4.50 an hour. I was stunned and then they said I ahd to BUY my own damn uniform!! I told him "No thanks" and he said "Why?" I replied. "I am expected, to guard a warehouse with $500-$1M in merchendise from all sorts of illegal entry not including the fact at that wage I'd probably be trying my best not to stoop to stealing from you also?!!" The guy was flabbergasted. 6 months later, I was with Wallace Security and found that that job had now gone under contract to Wallace Security.
  • i wouldnt waste their time, i would just cancel it so they can interview someone else
  • I was(many, many years ago) already accepted at the job of my choice, but wanted to find out what my classmates were so fearful of the interviewer from Honeywell. He knew I had that other job and liked my gumption and directness and offered me a position if i changed my mind.

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