ANSWERS: 6
  • Get a ratchet, a socket extension, a spark plug socket and a new, correct spark plug. Locate the #3 plug, remove the spark plug cable, remove the old plug, and insert the new plug. Make sure the new one matches the old one and is gapped correctly. Start screwing in the new plug by hand to avoid damaging the threads and then tighten it properly. Re-attach the cable, test the vehicle, and put tools away. Done.
  • Have your arms removed and surgically replaced with octopus tentacles.
  • Johnnn, Call your local Chevy dealer and ask someone in the service department(mine's closed today). Stay on the line until you get an answer. Post it here. I have the same problem with a 4.3l 1996 s-10. The steering column is in the way. I ended up cutting a spark plug socket down and welding it to a small piece of flat bar and bending it. I got it out but I'm having problems getting it started. On an older 2wd s10 I had, there was easy access to the motor mounts and you could take the bolt out of the drivers side mount and put a 2x4 under the side of the oil pan and jack the engine up to get at plug #3. This is not the case with the newer 4X4. My s10 has 96,XXX miles on it. The number #3 plug looked great, gap was what it was when set at the factory- .060. These AC iridium plugs are the same ones used in Cadillacs Northstar engine. They're designed to go 100,000 miles. I would trust them to go the distance. How many miles do you have on your 2003? (I did a tune up At 60XXX miles and just left #3 alone.) Good luck and if I find out how to put a plug back in the #3 hole I'll post it.
  • """ Get a ratchet, a socket extension, a spark plug socket and a new, correct spark plug. Locate the #3 plug, remove the spark plug cable, remove the old plug, and insert the new plug. Make sure the new one matches the old one and is gapped correctly. Start screwing in the new plug by hand to avoid damaging the threads and then tighten it properly. Re-attach the cable, test the vehicle, and put tools away. Done."""" Apparently that guy has never worked on this vehicle. You will need a universal to use with your ratchet, extension, and socket. You will also be better off going through the wheel well, you will have better access and leverage through there. Enjoy
  • OK, I'm going to help you guys out. I have worked for General Motors for some time now. 17 years to be exact.Don't be afraid of the steering shaft. In fact, it was designed the way it is so that it can be removed for the purpose of changing the driver side spark plugs. It is very accessible when you remove the air cleaner box. 1. First change all of your passenger spark plugs. These are the easy ones! 2. Next, remove your air cleaner top completely, by unscrewing the four wing bolts, and loosen the pipe strap just before the mass air sensor, and set the air cleaner top aside. 3. Now remove the bottom air box (its strait forward.) 4. Now comes the shaft. Unscrew the bolt at the base of the steering shaft just before the steering box. Remove it completely, and set aside. Note: You may have to turn your steering wheel to display the bolt. 5. Now just simply slide the shaft towards the firewall. If it doesn't come easily, I like to use a wrench and small hammer to lightly tap it off. Sometime a large flat head screw driver or pry bar will work. 6. Once you have the shaft off of the steering box, pull it completely out, and set it aside. This will give you plenty of space to work with. It is also surprisingly quick to do all of this also. 7. Now have at it with the spark plugs. 8. To install, just simply do the opposite of removal. I hope this will help some of you out. It may sound like a lot, but it really isn't. Don't be afraid of your problem. Tackle it with confidence.
  • Thank-you so much for the info about going into wheel well,it was quick,about 30 minutes to put new plug in.I would not take the steering rod off like other people recommend.Chasbo

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