ANSWERS: 41
  • No, It's the other way round. Being reasonably intelligent helps one to understand what is and is not grammatically correct.
  • I wouldn't say that it MAKES you an intelligent person, I just believe that it can be an indicator of one. Though, I suppose it does show that one is able to grasp these concepts and apply them to their communication, which IMO, is fantastic. I wish more people would!
  • I would say it's the ability to read and understand language that can lead you to further intelligence in other areas. Someone who can read can go on to learn about anything in the world, from history to auto mechanics to physics to cooking.
  • No it just makes you well versed, the ability to take those words and give them true meaning with in a sentance would be more meaningful.
  • People certainly take what you have to say a little more seriously.
  • It is helpful in life as you get used to using intelligent grammar in writing then you bring it into conversation and develop as a person not just as a writer.
  • Poor grammar does not (always) indicate poor intelligence. For instance, I once worked as secretary to a completely brilliant surgeon. One of his referring collegues had been ill, and upon sending a routine letter to her about a mutual patient, he had hand-written on the top, "I hope your feeling better!" I sent it back, telling him that I could not possibly send out that letter, nor correct it for him since it was in his handwriting. I repsectfully requested that he add the ' and e. He obliged. Another favorite (although hypothetical) demonstration of mine is in regard to punctuation. It goes like this: A class is given the assignment to use capital letters and punctuation in the following words where appropriate to make a correct statement: woman without her man is helpless Most of the men wrongly state: Woman without her man is helpless. The astute women in the class get it right: Woman. Without her, man is helpless. Same words, completely different meaning.
  • I'm certain that the ability to use good grammar does not make one more intelligent in other aspects of life, but it certainly can make one appear more intelligent.
  • It hasn't hurt me and that's for sure. I don't respect someone who has no regards for the language that they use. If you are a poor communicator then it is likely that your abilities are poor in other regards.
  • It doesn't MAKE you, no. But it would point to that conclusion.
  • Nope, you could have the best grammar in the world and be a total idiot.
  • Some of those who pride themselves in good grammar seem to think so.
  • Not that I've noticed. I know a few grammarians who couldn't pour p*ss out of a boot if the instructions were on the heel. But they sure do talk purdy. :)
  • I think that the ability to communicate well plays a large part in conveying intelligent thoughts.
  • 1) If you are intelligent, it could be easier for you to learn good grammar. But: - it is only a form of intelligence, which you maybe not have - you could lack interest for it, and prefer concentrating on other things It could be more difficult if you are not a native speaker. 2) If you are able to use good grammar, it could boost your communicative abilities. People will better understand what you mean (and the other way around) and they will not be prejudiced towards you because of your grammar. A better communication will certainly help you being recognized as an intelligent person: intelligence without communication has no much value. And it could also help you to extend and train your intelligence. 3) However, I am sure that there have been many intelligent people with a poor grammar who have achieved great success in life. I have heard some of those stories. 4) If you have a good grammar, it would be a good idea to be diplomatic when you are correcting other people's grammar. And in some situations it would be better not to do it. Diplomacy is also a form of intelligence.
  • Using good grammar is a choice, we all went to school.
  • I think using good grammar (and spellings) would certainly improve the impression people have of you.
  • The ability to use good grammar proves only that you have the ability to use good grammar. To assume anything else would be a mistake.
  • not exactly, being good with your grammar just proves that you know how to use the language properly. what makes a person intelligent is the meaning of what a person is saying.
  • I have known some exceptionally intelligent people to have the worst grammar. I don't think grammar should be used to gauge intelligence. Some people are just lazy.
  • Not necessarily. Some grammarians may just be a pontificating butt-head with good grammar.
  • No, It demonstates capacity for learning and retention of what "was" learned.
  • Not necessarily. You could still be naive about certain things. I suppose.
  • Not necessarily, but being able to express oneself sure helps people think you know what you are doing.
  • I have encountered quite a few people that pride themselves on their good grammar. Some of them couldn't get their way out of a paper bag
  • I ain't so sure that be correct.
  • I appreciate te question, it's nice. Right. I think that if you are sincere it will take you the farthest. Also if you work smart, and learn to use your maximum potential, that is high intelligence. Then if good grammer is something you have been given through your smart work, then you will be perfectly intelligent in the aspects that involve grammer. However, what one might think of anothers grammer, whether it be better or worse then there own, is unintelligence itself. Love, peace, and Joy are not derived from grammer, but rather the heart. If there is an intelligent person, would he think grammer makes intelligence. But, writings from those with great grammer have brought me the greatest tools letters could provide. Good grammer makes you better in others aspects, but not more intelligent. Peace.
  • That is a great question. I used to feel very strongly that if someone utilized poor grammar that they were less intelligent. However, I have worked with many brilliant people including physicians who cannot even spell the simplest words correctly. I really don't understand it, why don't they just learn it. Oddly, I've recently started dating someone who uses so so grammar, at best, and has horrific spelling yet is a very intelligent businessman. I have difficulties with the incorrect grammar he uses alot of the time and I feel embarrassed for him at times but ultimately, he somehow can get away with it because what he actually says is typically very interesting and informational despite the grammar. HHMMM Apparently, it does not make you an intelligent person but reality is, if you're smart, you'll learn the correct way, at least most of the time and/or the common stuff like him and he....I'm happy to be somewhere in the middle with grammar and most things. Life experience makes you intelligent, if indeed you pay attention and learn from it. That's my thought.
  • No, it makes one a prig. Language will always be in flux until we find the precise combination of inflections, word orders, morphemes and phonemes which is optimal for the exchange of ideas.
  • I think good language is a measure of intelligence because the extent of one's language determines the depth of understanding that an individual has. This means that they are capable of learning something to a high standard. However, whether it is in one field or more depends on the individual.
  • No. I have met plenty of grammarians who have no common sense and are socially retarded.
  • Yes. The ability to communicate clearly is a prerequisite to learning anything else.
  • I think the two often go hand in hand -- intelligence being necessary for learning and applying the rules of grammar, and being well-spoken plays an important role in acquiring education. But they don't necessarily go together. I especially try to keep that in mind for people whose second language is English. My grammar in Danish, my second language, is awful but that doesn't mean I'm any less intelligent than I am when I'm speaking English. I only sound stupid. :-)
  • Yes. I think think before you speaking is very greatly. It's what I doing best .
  • Not necessarily. But it can make you appear to be an intelligent person, which is sometimes just as good.
  • Nothing a person can say "makes" one intelligent, or we would all be brilliant from the mere incantation of certain grammatically perfect phrases. However, the ability to wield and shape words into intelligent thought while at the same time using good grammar is a clue that a person MAY be intelligent. Time and experience will prove whether or not the clue was true.
  • It's the other way around - intelligence makes it easier to grasp the value and mechanics of proper grammar...
  • It's the opposite. Intelligence facilitates your ability to use good grammar.  
  • Not necessarily, but it does at least show that you pay attention to details and rules. That might tend to show that you pay attention to other things as well. The reason the military does white glove inspections is not to make their fighting men wonderful janitors, but to teach them to check and recheck no matter how stressed they are. This can make the difference in combat between rechecking the map and coordinates and calling in an air strike on the enemy, or not rechecking and calling in friendly fire. They clean rifles religiously, not to make men really good at cleaning rifles, but to ensure they can disassemble and reassemble a rifle quickly under the worst conditions, so that they can quickly clear a jam in combat. I think the same applies to your question. A person who uses good grammar is a person who can remember and apply rules and a person who rechecks what they do. Both would tend to bode well on your ability to remember and apply other rules as well, like how to do good research and check the results, or how to formulate a good argument.
  • Not necessarily. Someone very close to me is extremely intelligent, and that's not just my opinion, but is very lazy about grammar and names. I think intelligence is a combination of common sense, the ability to solve problems and to understand abstract concepts. I thought my Siamese cat was smart because he fetches. Since this is a trait of Siamese cats, I am not so sure this is an indicator of intelligence. But he figured out that his favorite toy mouse was attached to a string when, it was thrown behind the couch. After looking up, down and around with no success, he pulled the string and retrieved his mouse. Now he does it repeatedly, even if he can't acutally see the mouse. To me that is intelligence.
  • Depends on the type of intelligence in question. The human mind is divided into many intellectual categories. These are; emotional, numeral, spatial, lateral, literal, to name but a few. Its impossible and unreasonable to expect a topic governed by one type of intelligence to be used as a gauge for measuring all the other categories of intellect.

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