ANSWERS: 4
  • if i've understood it right: Black "dots" (burned pixels) on a LCD screen.
  • "Defective pixels are pixels on a liquid crystal display (LCD) not performing as expected. The ISO standard ISO 13406-2 distinguishes between three different types of defective pixels, while hardware companies tend to have further distinguishing types. Similar defects can also occur on CCD or CMOS image sensors in digital cameras. In these devices, defective pixels fail to sense light levels correctly, whereas defective pixels in LCDs fail to reproduce light levels correctly." "Stuck Sub-Pixels: A stuck sub-pixel is a pixel that is always "on." This is usually caused by a transistor that is not getting any power, and is therefore continuously allowing light at that point to pass through to the RGB layer. - Stuck versus dead pixels: Stuck pixels are often incorrectly referred to as dead pixels, which have a similar appearance. In a dead pixel, all three sub-pixels are permanently off, producing a permanently black pixel. Dead pixels can result from similar manufacturing anomalies as stuck pixels, but may also occur from a non-functioning transistor resulting in complete lack of power to the pixel. Dead pixels are much less likely to correct themselves over time or be repaired through any of several popular methods. Stuck pixels, unlike dead pixels, have been reported by LCD screen owners to disappear, and there are several popular methods purported to fix them, such as gently rubbing the screen (in an attempt to reset the pixel), cycling the color value of the stuck pixel rapidly (in other words, flashing bright colors on the screen,) or simply tolerating the stuck pixel until it disappears (which can take anywhere from a day to years). While these methods can work on some stuck pixels others cannot be fixed by the above methods. Also some stuck pixels will reappear after being fixed if the screen is left off for several hours. Hardware manufacturers and distributors tend to claim that TAB faults, in opposition to other forms of defective pixels, will not allow for repair or reliving of the issue, in opposition to other physical defects that may be found in an LCD." "1 Variations 1.1 Dark Dot Defects 1.2 Bright Dot Defects 1.3 Partial Sub-Pixel Defects 1.4 TAB Faults 1.5 Stuck Sub-Pixels 2 Stuck versus dead pixels" Source and further information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead_pixels
  • tuck pixels are often incorrectly referred to as dead pixels, which have a similar appearance. In a dead pixel, all three sub-pixels are permanently off, producing a permanently black pixel. Dead pixels can result from similar manufacturing anomalies as stuck pixels, but may also occur from a non-functioning transistor resulting in complete lack of power to the pixel. Dead pixels are much less likely to correct themselves over time or be repaired through any of several popular methods. Stuck pixels, unlike dead pixels, have been reported by LCD screen owners to disappear, and there are several popular methods purported to fix them,[4] such as gently rubbing the screen (in an attempt to reset the pixel), cycling the color value of the stuck pixel rapidly (in other words, flashing bright colors on the screen,) or simply tolerating the stuck pixel until it disappears (which can take anywhere from a day to years). While these methods can work on some stuck pixels others cannot be fixed by the above methods. Also some stuck pixels will reappear after being fixed if the screen is left off for several hours. Hardware manufacturers and distributors tend to claim [3] that TAB faults, in opposition to other forms of defective pixels, will not allow for repair or reliving of the issue, in opposition to other physical defects that may be found in an LCD.(wikipedia)
  • Its a pixel (dot) on your monitor that will not display the correct or any color. Often they are black, but they can also be red, green, or blue.

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