ANSWERS: 20
  • Changing these sorts of things isn't worthy of the time spent discussing them. Also, as a nation "In God We Trust" still holds true.
  • this doesnt answer your question, but i wonder if you would mind answering mine? Avatar 1. Describe in your own words what Atheism means to you and how old were you when you discovered you were an Atheist? 2. How do you view Christianity? Ie. For example the ten commandments? Or heven or hell ect… Faith: 3. How would you define faith and what it means to you? 4. What do you rely on as your faith if any? Morality: 5. Describe who holds you accountable for moral obligation to society. Myths: 6.What myths of Atheism would you like to clarify? If any? Closing: 7. Is there anything you would like to say that I have not asked
  • It's a part of our history. One that many people believe in to this day. And many others are apathetic towards. So basically there isn't nearly enough people who would want it removed. I'm an atheist, yet I cherish this nations history too much to ignore any of it. It certainly doesn't offend me that millions and millions have and do worship god in the US.
  • Well, it IS the National Motto... In God We Trust... All Others Pay Cash.
  • It doesn't exactly matter that its on there. Even speaking as an Agnostic and firm advocate of separation of church and state, I'd rather people focus their attention away from things as trivial as religion in our currency, and onto more important issues that actually influence our lives substantially. For instance, how much of the time and effort spent discussing "In God We Trust" on money, could have been spent discussing stem cell research, reproductive rights, or any of the other areas in which religious influence in government is actually harming people and obstructing society? I for one don't care much if we have religious slogans on our money; I can always stop looking at the details on my quarters if it bothers me that much. But when religious influences start to significantly manipulate the nature of public life and rights... then you have an issue much more worthy of our valuable time and attention.
  • I don't think there are good arguments for leaving it in place: it's divisive -- it creates a "we" which does not include everyone. Plenty of people do NOT trust in God, it suggests they're not part of "we". That's actually anti-American... "we the people" means "everybody", not just those who subscribe to a particular religious view. If it said "some of us trust in God", it would at least be accurate.
  • I do not think "In God We Trust" should be removed from the currency, as, for many people, the god they trust is the money itself!
  • It serves as a warning that the value of the paper is as mythical as belief in a non-existent supernatural being.
  • why spend the money to remove it doesnt hurt a single thing being up there so what if people dont particularly agree with it being up there, who cares get a life, get a job, have a family be productive to society, stop worrying us with stupid petty shit.
  • Long established traditions are to be cherished. Not to be done away with. Its a totally harmless statement even to people who's trust lay elsewhere. And it does remind people of God everytime they touch a $ bill. Beneficial all around and totally harmless to all.
  • Like it or not this country was founded by people who believe in God. The constitution for example sets the foundation: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."
  • That'll be none, except for the reasons that go it instituted in the first place. What never ceases to appal me if the hypocrisy of the Religious Right. That is a blatant violation of the separation of church and state clause, one that they are all to quick to scream for when it's convenient to them. I propose that we change that motto to "In No God We Trust" It's it absolutely incomprehensible to me how supposely the biggest, most powerful and most progressive nation in the world can have nonsense, voodoo and superstition on its currency, one which is used worldwide. Shame, shame, shame!
  • Why creating controversy over something that would not make any difference, when there are so many problems and conflicts that should be dealt with before wasting our time over silly arguments?
  • "In God We Trust" was put on all paper currency by an Act of Congress in 1955; the phrase was declared the national motto by an Act of Congress in 1956 and first appeared on paper currency in 1957. The mid-to-late 1950s were a time of overt racism, religious discrimination, and political oppression in the United States. McCarthyism was at its feverous peak. The "red scare" had Congress and President Eisenhower acting in paranoid fits of illegal and unconstitutional activity. The FBI, under the militant J. Edgar Hoover, engaged in illegal spying campaigns against Americans. During this period, the federal government acted more like an authoritarian dictatorship than a constitutional democracy. The government violated civil rights with impunity. Adding "In God We Trust" to the US currency was an act of religious and political propaganda, allegedly to counter the threat of "godless communism." Do we really want to continue to commemorate this dark time in our history?
  • How much is this going to cost us? I thought so. That's too much. Fuggeddabouit. Happy Sunday! :)
  • I've never met one who objects to "In God We Trust" on payday.
  • Because it puts God above everything, as He should be. It puts Him above the president featured on the currency, and above the value of the currency itself. We can trust God a lot more than we can trust presidents.
  • hmmm perhaps because "In God We trust"
  • Firstly, when we start removing God from our society, we mess up things even more. This country is going socialist, and so many people seem to like the idea.
  • There are no valid arguments for having it stay. We are a secular nation and should act like one. We'll get it removed faster when the 'authorities' figure out mentions of 'god' will be triggers for flashbacks for our Iraqi/Afghanistan vets. Government references to god were all over the place there. It'll remind them of that time.

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