ANSWERS: 35
  • I don't have any kids but if that was the case then no. They have every right to.
  • No I wouldn't.
  • if i ever adopted a child i would not.
  • I hope I don't regret writing this but my answer would be YES and NO. Yes, beause it ust depends on the situation, and the age of the child. If the child is at pre-teen or early teen age, and their biological parents were drug adicts who sold their bodies for money to support their addiction... well then of course I wouldnt want their child knowing that - because I fell that as they havent fully matured yet this could impact their development in a bad way.... Obviously when they are an adult they can do what they want and I can't hinder them, but by that point I would hope they are confident and mature anought to be able to handle the news of finding out bad things about your biological parents. But if that wasent the case, then I would probably help the child find their biological parents if I thought this was going to benefit them.
  • nope, it is their choice and their right to know who there biological parents are...
  • No. It's natural be curious about your roots and it doesn't mean they're rejecting their family. Besides, if they can get information about their genetic/biological family medical history, that can be meaningful for their future health.
  • If I adopt a child, I would plan on letting them know from an early age that we chose them to be ours and that their birth parents loved them enough to choose adoption. If they wanted to look for their parents, I would feel secure enough in our love and in my place in their life that I wouldn't be jealous of their desire to find them. I would use caution though and try to discover what type of people they were, if they'd be open to the idea of meeting etc. and not just assume that knowing them would be good for the child.
  • HONESTLY... YES I WOULD STOP THEM. I'D TELL THE CHILD THAT THEY NEED TO WAIT, RIGHT NOW THEY NEED TO FOCUS ON SCHOOL AND SO SUCH.. BUT LET THEM KNOW.. THAT WHEN THEY ARE AN ADULT THEY CAN GO LOOKING FOR THEIR BIOLOGICAL PARENTS && WHEN THEY DO THEY CAN TELL/SHOW THEIR BIOLOGICAL PARENTS THERE ACHIEVEMENTS AND SO SUCH.. A CHILD SEARCHING FOR THEIR BIOLOGICAL PARENTS IS TOO MUCH STRESS AND TIME FOR THEIR AGE...
  • I don't have an adopted child, but I would never stop him/her. I would prepare him/her and help him/her in any way I could.
  • I wouldn't if I had adopted kids...
  • It would depend on the child's age. If they were old enough to understand what they were getting into and have the ability to deal with whatever the outcome may be, then no I wouldn't stop them.
  • Absolutely not. I would actually help them in their search.
  • I was adopted at 3 weeks of age. My parents told me from day one that I was adopted. They also told me that if I wanted to persue finding my birth parents they would support my efforts 100%. Just knowing that I never felt as though I need to search for them. Now with that being said, as I am getting older (46) when I go to the doctor, they are asking me about the health of my parents. So I tell them I don't know that I was adopted.... at that time I get a little concerned or interested in finding them for health reasons. I'm happy with who I am and where I am in life. I have a beautiful wife, three wonderful children, and am blessed to have the world best granddaughter and grandson. So to answer your quesrtion, no I would not my parents didn't.
  • oh no, never, i was adopted, and i was longing to search for my biol. parents, luckily, my a.parents supported me every step of the way
  • No I wouldn't. Every single person deserves to know who their real parents are. It seems cruel to keep that from someone. But of course I would want them to be of a mature age so they understand what they're doing and what the consequences are if they perhaps don't find them or they want nothing to do with them etc.
  • no as i am in that position,but the opposite way.i admit im a bad father but i am trying to make up for it,if a child wants to trace their biological parents,it would be wrong and cruel to stop him/her
  • I think I would for health background in my genes.....
  • No..but I would be very involved in the process--you never know what will be behind door #2...I wish you the best :)
  • its cruel. and whats worse is the parents that lost to begin with. i feel for all them poor souls that loose their children. they should know their parents. parenting aint about selfishness. its selflessness, selfless love. from a fellow dad i say this. stay honorable!!!!!!!!
  • Thats difficult to answer. I adopted my nephew after my brother died and the mother abandoned him. I would tell him the truth about his father when he's older, but I'm not sure what to say about his mother. She wanted absolutely nothing to do with him, she hated her own son. I dont want him to go trough the pain of learning that. And I'm not sure he would even be able to find her.
  • Not if he/she were old enough to understand that the birth family might not respond well. Personally, I believe that the birth mother should specify if it is OK or not. Another thing is that certain health information is sometimes critical to have. I think an extensive health report from both parents is a good idea - even if anonymous.
  • No - I think they have the right to know. You may feel jealous that they're spending time with their biological parents, but you are the people that brought them up, so they will love you too much to ever leave you.
  • If I had an adopted child, I would help him/her to find their biological parents.
  • No, I would encourage it if that is what my child wanted. I would feel secure enough in my raising of the child, that finding their biologicals would not pose a threat.
  • I would support their search, but not do it for them. I would give any information *I* have, if they ask for it. I would also make certain they knew that they were with me because I loved them and wanted them, no matter if their search turned out positively or negatively. I'd also point out how lucky I was to be able to choose my child. And make sure they knew how happy I was with my choice.
  • No, of course not. I would make sure they know the details of why they're not with their biological parents and try to give them some idea of what to expect if they find them, though.
  • Nope... I don't believe that the world begins and ends at the tip of my own nose and that everyone else should see things from my vantage point. I would not only allow it, I would help them. Im not an insecure person (not in that way anyhow) and I would at least hope that I raised them to be able to think and feel for themselves no matter what happens as a result.
  • No, if your child wants to know their biological parents you shouldnt stop unless you want them to rebel... trust me im a teenager all i do is rebel.
  • No, the child is on a search for a reason.
  • It would depend on what I knew about their bio-parents. If they were some young teenage couple who simply couldn't support a baby, I'd support the search as much as possible. On the other hand, If I knew the father had raped the mother and the mother had nothing but hatred for the child, I would probably try to have them hold off until they are at an age where I could gently explain such circumstances to them.
  • I think finding your biological parents is great. My children were adopted too and I am trying to find them also. My childrens names before they were adopted were. Rodney Brown, Elizabeth Brown, Lance Brown, Bryan Brown, and Richard Brown. I hope you find what you are looking for.
  • Only if there was a physical threat to them. Otherwise, no.
  • No i wouldn't unless they were faced with great danger by doing it. I think the child has a right to know who they came from as long as they know that it doesn't change who they are.
  • Our child's bio parents are in Kazakhstan. I would not stop her from searching but we have no information about her bio parents, none. I think she has no chances to find them.
  • This will sound bad, but if they were a baby when adopted - I would never tell them they were adopted.

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