ANSWERS: 4
  • Snow just before Christmas. Or perfect sunny weather in June. It's a tie. Oh ...there's also that autumn leaves thing, thats pretty good too. Yea. "New England Weather" is my answer.
    • Mr PantsFellDown
      Are you in England? Is that where you encounter fog? (It's a bit rare here. You kind of have to get an an ocean ferry in the morning to see any of that.
    • Anoname
      No. Charlotte, North Carolina, USA.
    • Linda Joy
      Alabama has some, too.
    • Crazychick
      Well well, fancy that! A place in North Carolina named after me. Lol:)
    • Anoname
      We were going to invite you to the naming ceremony for the city but we didn't think you could make it.
  • Fog is cool. A little mysterious scary even sometimes but I prefer sunny days. I also agree with Mr. Pants about snow before Christmas, but one week is enough for me then I'm done. And the fall foliage is beautiful both in Maine and at Oak Mountain. I used to drive by it every day on the way to and from work before I moved to Birmingham. I also think dew is pretty cool how plants can bring drops of water from the ground like that and put them on display is fascinating! And I think it would be cool to learn how to harness the power of lightning and hurricanes and tornadoes to produce power. Or even the tide going in and out should be even easier.
    • Anoname
      I like that it hides things that you could normally see.
    • Linda Joy
      Yes, nature playing hide and seek! But therein also lies the danger.
    • Nosmo King
      Linda, have you any idea what dangers really lurk in the fog? See my answer for a couple of detailed examples.
    • Linda Joy
      Yes, but it's less of an issue these days with all the improvements in warning devices, thankfully! Fog is an issue for ships as well. I was assigned to a 'fog watch' once when I was assigned to the USS SIMON LAKE but never had to stand it.
  • I love warm sunny weather.
    • Anoname
      Matches your personality. Warm and friendly.
  • What's so good about fog? It's the most hazardous weather for travelling. My dad used to work on the railway and he and his colleagues always dreaded fog. I still have my late father's book about railway accidents, it describes them all in detail. Fog featured in several major accidents in the 1940s and 50s. The worst of this type of accident occurred at Harrow and Wealdstone (near London) in 1952, when a train ran past stop signals in fog, smashed into the back of another train standing ahead on the same track, and tilted over onto the other track just as another train was approaching in the other direction. The three trains piled into confusion (demolishing the station footbridge in the process) and fell onto the station platforms, leaving 122 dead and 349 others injured. A similar accident occurred in London in 1957, this time involving only two trains. Once again one of the trains overran stop signals in fog and smashed into the rear of a stationary train on the same track further ahead. This collision occurred underneath a heavy iron bridge which carried another railway line overhead. The train which overran the signals was derailed in the collision and it knocked out one of the support columns holding up the overhead bridge, then the bridge collapsed onto the already damaged train below. 92 lives were lost in this accident and 223 survivors were injured. All this was because of fog. Now you know that, why do you like fog so much?
    • Anoname
      Obviously NOT because of the incidents you mentioned. I once saw some war footage of a platoon charging into the fog to combat the enemy. The narrator of the documentary explained that none of those soldiers ever returned from that fog. It was as if they had charged right into eternity. Since then I've thought of fog as a kind'a gateway to the next life. Like when people imagine Heaven in a cloudy haze.
    • Nosmo King
      It was sort of like that for the victims of those train crashes, only not quite in the same way as you describe it.
    • Linda Joy
      A lot more ppl are killed by other far more dangerous weather conditions. Tsunamis and hurricanes for example.
    • Nosmo King
      Those are extremely rare where I live, Linda. Fog is not a rare occurrence at all, although accidents as serious as those are now thankfully rare (mainly because of advanced technology on railway signalling).

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