ANSWERS: 22
  • ragdoll, corpse, rag, or used blanket would be my suggestions. It depends on the story and your particular writing style, doesn't it?
  • ....bag of trash.
  • I found a list of hundreds of "dragged like a" on google. Personally I think "like a dog", "like a piece of meat", or "a bag of trash" would fit best. I loved "like a tired peacock's tail" or "like a tool bar across the computer screen". Maybe "dragged like a sheep"?
  • depending on how he was being dragged, by a force or a person the only things I can think of are person : dragged like a sacrificial lamb force: dragged like so much flotsam
  • broken soul
  • prized hunted deer
  • like a: wet noodle bag of trash convict in chains unconsious child ships lowered anchor soggy bed sheet drag queen drift anchor shrimp catcher's net
  • "young calf on it way to slaughter"
  • FadingxSmiles - just a couple of suggestions here. Take out "like a _____". Your readers will understand what's going on without your describing the drag. In "The Grammar and Style Guide", Laurent Grenier wrote, "Surprisingly often a difficult problem in a sentence can be solved by simply getting rid of it." and "The reader plays a major role in the act of writing and must be given room to play it. Don't annoy your readers by over-explaining – by telling them something they already know or can surmise." http://www.laurentgrenier.com/grammar&style.html Can you change to active voice from passive? Who, or what, dragged him to his doom? Passive voice is weak and undermines the scenario. An action-oriented sentence generally benefits from active voice. Sometimes passive voice is preferable, however, and maybe that's true here. Hard to say without reading the entire passage. Hang in there. Nobody said this stuff was easy:)
  • "Questions flashed through his mind as he was dragged like a MARTYR toward his doom"
  • convict prisoner martyr hostage condemned man fat turkey at Thanksgiving traitor reluctant teenager stubborn mule ornery goat kite lead weight destined hero frightened child swimmer in caught in an undertow leaf in a whirlpool ship on a whirlpool man entranced <A little more context would help. Let us know what you end up using, okay? Smile.>
  • sacrificial lamb
  • Thanks everyone! These were very helpful! I ended up going with "corpse" (suggested by science_geek). Here's a little bit of the story the sentence was used in. Time passed. How long? Seconds, minutes, hours? He didn’t know, nor did he care. He was unfeeling, all emotions wiped from him, like a twisted baptism. He felt a stern, cold hand wrap around his wrist. His weary muscles cried out as they were forced to pull his weight. He was being dragged over the cold, smooth floor. Still, he wasn’t afraid. Let them do what they wanted, he had nothing to lose. He didn’t bother wondering how they knew where to find him, he already knew. Alison. She had betrayed him, joined the enemy. Questions flashed through his head as he was dragged like a corpse toward his doom.
    • Mircat
      You could have done a lot better than that. A corpse is a dead person. It wouldn't have a mind with questions flashing through it.
  • &quot;School girl with a skinned knee" "excaped torture victim" "poachers trophy" "slaughtered rape victim" "child dragging her teddy bear" "fallen soldier" "hunters catch" "drunken hooker" man i could name LOTS but i think its because i have a messed up mind (sorry if these offend anyone its not meant too)
  • an old-fashioned dustcart
  • an old-fashioned dustcart
  • &quot;like a weary partner in a 3-legged race" "like a screaming child from a ball pool" Oh, I see you're already sorted for a simile... well keep my ideas on file just in case.
  • Caveman's wife.
  • &quot;sack of garbage"
  • puppet
  • I dont think a metaphor is necessary or fitting. Too many people use them especially teen authors. I'd go with something such as: "Questions flashed through his mind as he was dragged clueless toward his doom." "Questions flashed through his mind as he was dragged panic stricken toward his doom."

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