ANSWERS: 39
  • Good question. I suppose it would, and voices would become the new problem- i.e., "she talks too loud." There will always be something we don't appreciate about one another.
  • Of course, people are not just prejudice about looks, race etc. they also judge on gender and choices.
  • Yes, people would still hold different beliefs.
  • Good question. In fact, I once posed this question to my friend Tonia, who has been blind from birth. She told me that for the longest time she didn't understand what people were talking about when they discussed different skin colors, and since she could not distinguish between those it had no meaning to her. She had no idea what her own skin color was! She said that now she can sometimes distinguish by voice what a person's ethnicity is, and that certainly this could be used as a basis for prejudice, if one were so inclined. Tonia also mentioned that she knows several blind people who harbor various kinds of religious prejudices, but that none have to do with skin color. So unfortunately the answer is yes, prejudice would exist even without the sense of sight.
  • Some, yes.
  • As long as pride exists, prejudice will co exist.
  • To a degree yes ... If a blind person grows up in a prejudice environment ... then I think they would be inclined to hold the same values as there peers ... If sight did not exist in anyone ... then No ... I don't believe it would ...
  • Yes. I am prejudiced by how people smell. I have a really sensitive sense of smell. I am prejudiced against people who are small minded and against people who spout unintelligent babble without really knowing what they are talking about. I am prejudiced against people who do not understand the difference between fact and opinion. I am prejudiced against people who go through life with a false sense of entitlement (people who do not know the difference between a right and a priviledge).
  • Yes, because there would still be gender, beliefs, personality, sexual orientation and so on...
  • Of course it would. However you have inspired a new question (just for a giggle): http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/137757
  • yes, indeed. If human beings can't single others out for their looks, they will attack their accents, their smells, or whatever else they can distinguish. It is a basic human trait. "I don't like you because you are different. You, therefore, pose a threat." of "I like this person better than you." It is egotistical, ie derived from sin.
  • Yes. There are still many things that people are currently prejudiced about besides looks: smells, sound of voice, speech impediments, body size, gender, religious affiliation, political affiliation, etc. It's a long, sad list.
  • Yes I think it would still exhist, maybe not on colour I would think then the prejudice would become more a hearing thing and it would relate to accents.
  • Yes, I am prejudice again jerks and just because i cant see them doesnt mean they will go away
  • Yes - the only way it would NOT exist is if we all accepted the way that we are all different. There are 4 or 5 definitions of "prejudice" but all could be extinguished by one act - stop being judgemental and practice acceptence.
  • Absolutely, we will always find a reason to judge someone. If sight didn't exist, we'd use smell, sound, touch, to find something negitave to say. Not that I think it's right, but sadly it's the way people are.
  • IT would sill exist because of lifestyle differences,odors,language,beliefs etc...
  • I grew up in Hawaii, as a caucasian *several decades ago*. I had no idea what racism was until I moved to the mainland when I was 8 (to Kansas, thanks mom). It totally did not make sense to me. Still doesn't. I don't think you need to be blind to avoid it. You need to not be in that social construct.
  • You bet. If people were blind they would figure out how to tell the difference between people in other ways.
  • Study a group of people without sight, and you see the same peer groups as you do in people who can see, plus discrimination against others... It is a part of being human, and even though it is part of our heritage, it doesn't make it right.
  • Yes it would. Predujice can come from any of the senses, or none at all because it IS often senseless.
  • That is a very good question. I would think yes, because some people cannot stand other people's accents. Maybe even smell would have some impact on the person's mind. I hope this helps with answering your question. See you later! ;-)
  • As long as people communicate it will.
  • If we couldn't judge what we see, we'd probablly move onto the other 4 senses. Or if you have ESP, 5.
  • Prejudice is the natural human reaction to the unknown and the strange, it is impossible to eliminate, even without sight, then discrimination would be based on sound, texture, even taste. It's here, get used to it.
  • There would still be prejudice against gays.
  • yes however not in the way most people relate it with. like color of the skin.
  • Yes, because there is still sight, feeling, taste,& sound which people can judge others upon.
  • Yes... Someone would figure out that southerners don't speak with the same accent as northerners, Hoorsiers don't speak with the same accent as Buckeyes, etc., and the prejucide would be even MORE that way than it is now. There'd still be prejudices against those who smoke, drink, are gay, handicapped in other ways, elderly, youth, etc.
  • You'd pretty much have to eliminate all the senses and the ability to think for yourself to rid the world of all prejudice's, I think. So long as people can think and feel, prejudice will always be a problem, unfortunately.
  • Prejudice is a problem of insecurity so if insecurity were capable if you couldnt see, which I believe it can, then I think prejudice would exist
  • Prejudice is based in insecurity so if you are still capable fo being insecure while not being able to see then yes I think prejudice would exist
  • Prejudice is based in insecurity so if you are still capable fo being insecure while not being able to see then yes I think prejudice would exist
  • Yes, it just wouldn't be based on color or shape. It could be done on voice or accent, place of origin, sex, religion, government preference, all sorts of things like they are now.
  • yes, defenitly
  • Yes. :( (Opinion follows ...) Not a question of sight or any of our senses although we might use them as tools for a subset of prejudices. I think prejudice is in our human hearts and minds .. our beliefs and values .. our degree of respect for ourselves (and others) .. our willingness to respect and see as valid .. those "different than ourselves". Not to say we don't make judgements all the time .. as hopefully we "do" .. as we gain knowledge and experience! And, might disagree with a lot of people or ways of being along the way .. as we figure out who we are and where we stand on things. However, to disagree or to learn judgement is not the same as "judging" in the sense of uninformed pre-judging .. ie .. prejudice. Prejudice brings blanket judgements of "less than", "worse than" - often applied to an entire "group" based on limited or no personal knowledge or contact whatsoever. Very either/or .. us/them. Leads to other decisions and behaviors that sure don't do much for the human race. And no - nothing to do with physical blindness. Other kinds of blindness? Perhaps.
  • why do prejudices exist
  • Yes, because I judge people by the way that they speak.
  • While I was in college, I worked for an answering service. People liked to engage me in conversation. Once in awhile, a racial comment or slur would be made and they were totally unaware of my color. I had a few successful telephone interviews only for the person to be caught off guard and uncomfortable upon seeing what color I was. I am an attractive women. I was homecoming queen and class vice-president (not that this should matter either). My point is that blindness would force people to judge by personality and character. Also, in my current position, I work with customers and suppliers via e-mail and phone. Everything is peachy peachy but upon realized what color I am, some are visibly uncomfortable. My voice doesn't fit the stereotype. Not that this should matter either. Anyways, I worked in Chicago, Illinois for some time and most Chicagians seem to be indifferent to the color of my skin. Very refreshing.

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