ANSWERS: 42
  • Defensive. I'm always careful of other drivers. I'm not on the offensive while driving.
  • Defensive, i expect other drivers to make mistakes (as all humans do), and try to anticipate to put myself in the safest position.
  • Get outa my way and I'll tell you!!!
  • I think I'm a defensive driver,but my husband says I'm an offensive driver.lol.
  • Definitely defensive driver. Part of my back problems today are a result of an accident when I was only about 19-20 years old.
  • Defensive on the way TO the gym; perhaps a little offensive on the way home. ;-)
  • DEFENSIVE, I was hit head on, on my side of the road in July which has made me more aware of just how not in control some other drivers are. This does not mean that I drive slowly I am afraid on a Freeway i do drive very quickly, always stick to the limit in town though
  • Defensive- I like to give everybody else some room in case they make a mistake, then me and my First Aide kit can keep them alive untill the Paramedics arrive!
  • Depends on what I am driving. When I had my Harley and my Dodge hemi,,, I was offensive, now that I have a Caddy and a Lincoln, I am defensive. Caddys and Lincolns just dont seem like offensive cars to me.
  • Usually defensive as I assume other people are complete fscking morons, but I have my moments. Nice thing is most of my cars come pre-dented and nothing says, "Don't mess with me!" like a car that looks like I rammed the last ***hole who cut me off. All of the benefits of appearing psychotic without the higher insurance premiums :)
  • Defensive all the way. That has served me well, have never had a serious accident and my record is spotless. Not bad considering I live near and commute into Washington DC 5 days a week--lots of opportunity for bad things to happen. Having worked in insurance claims didn't hurt either. For 2 reasons: saw the aftermath of accidents firsthand, I know what kind of records other drivers have and it scares me to death. I don't want to be killed or be the idiot that kills someone else. The worst case I saw was a guy who, since the day he got his license, could do nothing but rack of tickets. Reckless driving, overtaking/passing illegally, failure to yield, stop, excessive speed, and the list went on. He finally managed to get vehicular manslaughter added to the list. Do you thnk he lost his license or is an improved driver? Nope. Sadly. From AOL Autos Today: Defensive Driving Tips Here are some important elements of defensive driving: Allow enough space ahead. Four out of ten accidents involve rear-end collisions, many of which could have been avoided by simply following at a safe distance rather than tailgating. You should allow at least two seconds between your vehicle and the car ahead of you. That gap should be lengthened to three seconds at highway speeds and four or more in rain or other poor weather conditions. Look ahead. Scan the road and the surrounding area at least a few hundred yards ahead for potential road hazards. Look around on both sides, and keep your eyes open for approaching vehicles, pedestrians, or animals that might enter your path. Have an escape route. Check your mirrors every few seconds to see what's beside and behind you. Taking into account the position of the cars around you and the road ahead, decide where you could maneuver safely to avoid an accident. Having an avoidance route is essential. If you don't -- say, if the road is narrow and there's no shoulder -- you need to increase your following distance. Don't depend on other drivers. Be considerate of others, but look out for yourself. Don't assume that another driver is going to move out of the way or allow you to merge. Plan your movements anticipating the worst-case scenario. Keep your speed down. Remember that the posted speed limit applies to ideal conditions. You're responsible for decreasing your speed to match the conditions. Adjust for hazards. By slowing down or speeding up only slightly, or by moving to a different lane position, you may avoid a potentially hazardous situation. Avoid frequent lane changes. Try to maintain a speed near that of the flow of nearby traffic. Remember your lane discipline and keep right unless passing. Remember to check the blind spot before making a lane change, too. Use lights and signals. Turn your headlights on in dim daylight, rain, or other low-visibility weather conditions, and remember to always use turn signals. For expressway driving, we also believe that -- when still at a distance - a quick blink of the flash-to-pass feature on your headlights is far safer than the tailgating or the aggressive right-lane passing that often otherwise results. If you're in town, direct eye contact and gentle gestures might help clear any doubts over who has the right of way. Keep a proper driving position. Maintain a comfortable, upright driving position, with both hands on the steering wheel (preferably at the nine- and three-o'clock positions). This will put you in a better position to make sudden avoidance maneuvers. Wear your seat belt. It's still the best thing you can do to protect yourself in case the unexpected happens. It's hard to believe there are still those who don't buckle up, even though seatbelt use rates have never been higher. Cut out distraction. Any time you become preoccupied with distractions, you're letting your defenses up. As always, minimize your eating, drinking, CD-changing, and cell phone conversations. Save them for when you're stopped in a safe place. It's all about the attitude! Although defensive driving includes all of the above considerations, it's better described as a realization that driving is a privilege that you share with many others, that there are real people in other vehicles -- possibly even family, co-workers, or loved ones - and that aggressive, irresponsible driving on your part could put your life and the lives of others in danger. Defend your life.
  • i'm simply a non-driving driver or a future driver, i'm not 12...
  • right now i'm not a driver at all. but i used to be a defensive. i'll probably change that once i get my license back.
  • I am a flaky driver and am neither of these two things. I am your worst nightmare. I use the cell phone, and listen to books on cd simultaneously while driving = driving + listening to book + dialing cell phone = basic lack of attention.* Sometimes I get so deep into a book that I miss an exit I have gotten off at hundreds of times before. STAY AWAY FROM ME. *I realize that this is a problem. I am working on becoming a unifunctional driver>> driving and waiting to do other things until I get off of the road.
  • I'm a great driver. But others have said I can be very "OFFENSIVE." IYKWIM If you know what I mean...........
  • I was taught to drive like the other person is out to get me. lol in a wierd way that is almost reality today on the freeways.
  • On a motorcycle I am invisible.
  • Defensive
  • "The best defense is a good offense"... Does that apply? =)
  • Neither, I'm the pedestrian standing on the sidewalk and chuckling quietly to himself while the offensive *and* defensive drivers are caught in traffic.
  • I am a very agressive driver, but I do drive like everyone else on the road is drunk. Keeps me on my toes. I am a hardcore commuter - the highway is my playground...
  • I am defensive and affirmative.
  • Defensive-- it's the best offense
  • defensive
  • im a switch hitter..lmao (driving)i go both ways.
  • Motorcycle rider of 25 years. Defensive to the point of paranoia.
  • The speed limit on most roads here in Japan is 40kmph that is ridiculously slow, so it's pretty natural to be offensive here, passing people who think traffic jams are okay. I'm offensive on my motorbike, in my car, and generally in my daily life! LOL
  • Definitely defensive. I live in an urban area which has some of the worst traffic (and worst road rage) in the world. The only way to get home alive here is to ignore insults, accomodate bad drivers, and keep your temper -- eyes on the road, ears on the radio for traffic alerts and on the traffic for sirens (not on the phone!), and MOUTH SHUT. No chatting on the phone, no yelling insults at a guy who may have a Mac-10 sitting in his drink cupholder. DE-fense! DE-fense! DEEE-fense!!
  • Defensive. Always remember they are trying to kill you by seemingly applying lipstick, talking on the cellphone, swatting their children, reading a newspaper or falling asleep while trying to go somewhere at 65 mph. Always have a plan B and a plan C in case you have to move out of the way of danger. Leave enough room between you and the next deathwisher to stop in time.
  • Defensive Driver because you never know when someone is going to be having a bad day or just not paying attention.
  • Defensive, that was the way we were taught 30 years ago. I'd rather avoid an accident that cause one.
  • Defensive, I have to be where I live or I would be dead by now.
  • I'm a defensive driver. I don't get why people drive crazy when they're not in any rush to get anywhere. And besides, it happens more than not that a crazy driver passes me up, and I see him at the next stop light every time.
  • 99% defensive.
  • Defensive...sometimes my language can be a little offensive though. I don't yell at other drivers, I'm a mumbler.
  • i dont drive
  • If you are not a defensive driver you shouldnt have a license. Stupid question.
  • Very defensive driver. Being Offensive is for hot head losers.
  • Until I moved out here, I had road rage. Out here though, people are CRAZY, so I have changed my ways and am now defensive.
  • i dont drive
  • Defensive driver
  • defensive

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