ANSWERS: 15
  • Usually, when you release the ashes of a loved one, you do it somewhere or doing something that in life they loved. I have seen people do it bungee jumping. My father released his fathers ashes into the pond he fished in as a child, after having to talk to the complete strangers that lived in the house on the property now, and explaining it to them (and they still let him!) Now displaying them or keeping them is a totally different story. I find it funny to look at peoples faces when i tell them grampa is in grammas closet. He's just sitting there waiting for her to die, then they'll be mixed, and a certain amount will be given to each of their daughters each in a container that they can display or keep hidden... If you are thinking of this because you are writing your will... There is a new procedure, though expensive, that when my mom was going through cancer treatments, she was looking into... it is to turn your remains into a man-made diamond (or up to i think 6 for the average sized person) one large one, or six small ones. She wants to do that when she dies, and put them in rings that have her name inscribed in the middle for each of me and my siblings to pass on to daughters, for them to pass on to daughters...
  • Put them in an etch-a-sketch and play with them forever
  • my sister has always said that she wants her ashes mixing with glitter before they r spread!
  • My Grandpa wants to have his ashes separated and put into multiple windchimes. The windchimes will then be distributed to his grandchildren. Then we can all have a windchime making beautiful music in our backyards to remember him by.
  • Send them into space
  • For under a grand, you can have your loved one launched into space. I suppose this is a good idea for those of us who might need a little help getting through the pearly gates.
  • My Grandad is scattered near to the source of the Murray River (which he loved a lot), and my uncle and Nanna had to trek to the spot to release his ashes.
  • Since they probably have formaldehyde from the embalming process required in some states, don't sprinkle them on anything to expect to grow. One lady brought her husband's cremains home in an open container that looked to visitors in her home like an ashtray. They used it as such and one day one of her friends remarked that Harry seemed to be putting on weight. On a more serious note, I officiated at a lovely ash-scattering service on a boat in the Pacific near Santa Cruz. Each member of the family grabs some rose petals and ashes and tossed them overboard while sharing a happy memory of their loved one. You could have them mixed with clay or some other agent and formed into a statue of your loved one. ... or mixed with paints to create a portrait.
  • well, sense they probably have formaldehyde from the embalming process required in some states, don't sprinkle them on anything to expect to grow. One lady brought her husband's cremains home in an open container that looked to visitors in her home like an ashtray. They used it as such and one day one of her friends remarked that Harry seemed to be putting on weight. On a more serious note, I officiated at a lovely ash-scattering service on a boat in the Pacific near Santa Cruz. Each member of the family grabs some rose petals and ashes and tossed them overboard while sharing a happy memory of their loved one. You could have them mixed with clay or some other agent and formed into a statue of your loved one. ... or mixed with paints to create a portrait.
  • My fiancee wanted to be put into a teddy bear so that when someone felt lonely or missed him they could go hug the bear. I'm having it done out of his jean jacket so it'll be more durable with the kids.
  • There are a few companies that are creating concrete fish habitats with ashes mixed in. These are then placed on a reef that may be in decline. You become an artificial reef and the basis for new reef structure. Eco friendly and a very long lasting memorial.
  • I carried my Uncle's cremains in my trunk for about 3 months. Mom didn't want them in her house, and he had wanted to be scattered in another town, so it was a while before we could make the drive. I admit I took pleasure at having my child molesting uncle locked in my trunk. My ex FIL passed away last week, he was cremated and buried in his plot in a coffee can, per his request.
  • I don't think my last answer went through...so assuming it didn't: My dear friend Philip was a "Hello Kitty" devotee, so I bought some mini "Hello Kitty" lunchboxes to divide his ashes (or pashes as I call them) and distribute among friends and family. We will be gathering at a riverfront park, and people can scatter them or keep them as they wish. The only thing is that the lunchboxes are not airtight, so I am thinking...baggies..? That seems so wrong. I am also thinking of making wax paper packets tied with colorful string or something...Also there is a lot more left to him than I thought (his brother just sent him to me..) so the lunchboxes will not contain all of him. (He would be so happy to know this as he was quite short.) Any ideas..?? Thanks! JRJ
  • Buriel at sea just push the toilet bowl to flush as the water swirls pour my ashes into it where ever the water goes it will some day reach the ocean.
  • I dont think unusual disposals are appropriate unless the deceased specifically requested it in their will and its not illegal.

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