ANSWERS: 100
  • The ones you can read through or write in? Jokes aside, the answer would depend on what is that you want to get from the books.
  • The dictionary. Every time I open it, I learn something new.
  • I don't know what kind of books you like to read.... But i would recommend "The Notebbok", or "The Devil wears Proda". Hope that helps
  • I can give you some of my personal favorites, though I don't know if they'll appeal to everyone: Frankenstein - Mary Shelley (My favorite book ever- there's so many levels you can read it on adventure/ horror story, cautionary tale, religious allegory..) Valley of the Dolls- Jaqueline Susann (a real girly read, but with a dark side) Rebecca- Daphne Du Maurier (The most haunting book I've ever read- and I can reda it again and again) Through a Glass Darkly- Sheridan Le Fanu (Mainly because it contains "Carmilla" which I think is the ultimate vampire story- one of the main inspirations for Bram Stoker's "Dracula" which I'd also recommend) The Magic Toyshop - Angela Carter (One of my favorite writers anyway, she can do no wrong- but this is probably her best. Really beautiful modern fairy tale) A Series of Unfortunate Events- Lemony Snickett (The whole series, these books are so much fun! Make a change from usual sacharrine children's fare) His Dark Materials Trilogy - Phillip Pullman (would recommend for children or adults- blew my mind!) The Secret History- Donna Tartt (real good thriller- read it in 24 hours cos I couldn't put it down) The Beach- Alex Garland (The book is about three hundred times better than the film) Brighton Rock - Grahame Greene (wonderful writer, really interesting book, explores the problem of Catholic guilt) Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons (Very, very funny- you'll like it if you like things like Hamish Macbeth on the TV) Lolita- Vladimir Nabokov (More notorious than widely read, more moral than most people expect) Bitch- Elizabeth Wurtzel (my kind of feminism - good for anyone who wants a job, the vote, the right to choose and Chanel lipstick) New Hopes for a Changing World - Bertrand Russel (An example of why you don't need to be religious to be a good person) Perfume- Patrick Suskind (You'll need a strong stomach as its very gory at times, but its a wonderful tale of murder in 18th century France) Anyway- I'm getting carried away now...
  • A book called " Why men don't listen and women can't read maps " amazon: ( http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0767907639/sr=8-1/qid=1154023251/ref=pd_bbs_1/104-2550532-4102360?ie=UTF8 )
  • Blowing my Cover-Lindsay Moran The Gunslinger-Stephen King Wrinlke in Time- Madielline L'engel Post Secret-Frank Warren The Alaphabet of Manliness-MADDOX The Da Vinci Code-Dan Brown To Kill a Mockingbird-Harper Lee Of Mice and Men-John Steinbeck The Heroes-Charles Kingsley Gilgamesh
  • "Strings of Connection" Book one of the Witches in America Series, by Durk Simmons. It's a fun book about this family of witches that have like, super powers. They can fly, read minds, stuff like that. They take their kid to this magic forest so he can fly and stuff too. It's written really well, it's like Durk is talking right to you. You can get it here on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1425939392/ref=pd_rvi_gw_1/104-4496738-2691139?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n=283155 Hope that helps!
  • I'm a total sci-fi/fantasy addict. I typically try to find a good author and then end up reading everything they've written. As such, my list will start out with authors because listing all their good books would take way too long! Some of my favorites are: Robert Asprin - His fantasy humor Myth series is a classic. I haven't been too impressed with the latest releases in it but how can you beat a bumbling magician that can barely whip up some sparks and smoke that ends up with a reputation as the most powerful and feared wizard in all the dimensions. Anne Bishop - I somehow missed her Black Jewels trilogy when it first came out. Someone recommended it on their Amazon list so I gave it a try. The first book was a little slow to start with but picked up speed like a roller coaster. A very dark world with a lot of suffering (not for younger readers), some glimmers of hope, and a love story at the core. I found the behavior of the characters a little odd in the third book but that might just be me. Jim Butcher - I love his Harry Dresden series. I guess the best description is 'wizard noir.' Fun to read with an empathetic main character. He recently started a new series, Codex Alera, that is a good sword and magic type of fantasy with an interesting spin on the magic part. Rachel Caine - Her Weather Warden series really takes a new tract when it comes to mystical powers and djinn. These are so action packed and such a fast read, I practically get whiplash. Not a series to start if you have a project due or need to get to bed on time. C.S. Friedman - Her Coldfire trilogy is a classic 'humanity struggling against being squished' tale. It's been a long time since I read it so I forgot most of the story. Definitely time for a re-read! She also wrote one of my favorite science fiction computer geek novels. This Alien Shore is based in enough technological reality that it didn't wrench me out of the book with glaring factual errors. It follows the mysterious Jamisia through a dangerous world of technology and a guild that controls all space travel and will do anything to keep their monopoly. Laurell K. Hamilton - I debated whether I should include her on this list or not. Her Anita Blake series started out as a fantastic supernatural whodunit. Vampires, werewolves, zombies, and some great character development. It could be a little racy at times but not egregiously so. Sadly, the series devolved into hollow characters and flimsy plots that were just a vehicle for porn. I wouldn't say I'm a prude and if you like where the series went, more power to you. I just miss the vibrant stories of the first eight books. I am only recommending these books up to, and including Obsidian Butterfly. Read beyond at your own risk. Her Meredith Gentry series gets the same explicit content, flimsy plot warning. Robin Hobb - She has three trilogies that take place in the same world. Start with the Farseer Trilogy (follow assassin's apprentice Fitz through a life full of intrigue), then Liveship Traders (high seas adventures. Different characters but the final trilogy won't be as meaningful if you skip this one), and then Tawny Man (I don't think this was as strong as the others but you have to read it to see how it ends!). This is storytelling on an epic scale. Tanya Huff - She's a very prolific writer with five different series and several stand alone novels (not a dud in the bunch in my opinion). Her stuff may not be for younger readers if parents object to same sex couples. I only say this because some people offend easily when it comes to any type of homosexuality. She presents it realistically and without flinching or being self-conscious. Nothing too graphic as I recall. That said, her two vampire series are eminently readable. The newest one is a spin off of the first and offers in interesting look into TV show production. The Four Quarters quartet is bardic high fantasy. The Keeper series is amusing and has a crabby old cat in it. Good enough for me :) The Valor series is light science fiction. If you like space stories but aren't into some of the heavy hitters, this is for you. Larry Niven - I love his Ringworld series. I read it when I was 12 or 13 so I should probably give it another go as I'm sure I'll have a completely different perspective now. This is a superlative example of science fiction writing. I would classify the Ringworld itself among the list of interesting characters. Ahh, such flights of engineering fancy. J.K. Rowling - If you haven't heard about Harry Potter by now, it's time to crawl out of your bunker and give it a try. It's just as enjoyable a read for adults and one could even argue that the latest books are a little too grim for younger children. Now, for the single recommendations. I'm not saying the other things these authors have written are bad, I either didn't consider them 'best of' list worthy or haven't read them. Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett - Hilarious. I don't recommend reading this in public because people won't sit next to someone who's cackling madly. Who knew the antichrist and the end of the world would be so entertaining. If you have no sense of humor when it comes to religion, you may just want to avoid this one. Headcrash by Bruce Bethke - my absolute favorite computer geek novel of all time. He went a little psycho writing the ending but if you ignore the last 10 pages of the book, it's perfect. Snow Crash by Neil Stephenson - Greatly imaginative cyberpunk novel. I love the way he portrays the virtual world the Internet has become. Tailchaser's Song by Tad Williams - Every cat lover should read this book. Told from the feline point of view as Tailchaser tries to rescue his friend Hushpad. Reminiscent of Watership Down. If this is too much fiction for you and you want something that will make you think, try Hyperspace by Michio Kaku. I've been working on this one for a while. I read a page or so and then have to take a break to chew on it. He has great descriptions of complex theories. Since we're only used to three spatial dimensions, trying to imagine what the fourth spatial dimension would be like is tough. His description was about as clear as anyone could get :) There were so many others that I left out but I had to draw the line somewhere. Happy reading!
  • I would personally recommend to a random person such as myself and perhaps you: Join Me- Danny Wallace- The story of a man who accidentally started his own cult The Yes Man- Danny Wallace- The story of the same man saying yes to absolutly evry question he was asked Are You Dave Gorman?- Dave Gorman- The story of two men, a lot of booze and time to waste, and a hell of a load of Dave Gormans! Googlewhack Adventure- Dave Gorman- One man, another stupid bet and googlewhacks! These guys are my heros, because they devote so much time and effort into randomness, and their dedication is amazing! They are best friends, and it always seems to start with them getting bored, drinking and having a bet! Its always a laugh!
  • The Bible Kids - The Thief Lord by Cornelia Funke, The Mr. Men series by Hargrave (?) Historial/Romance - Outlander by Diana Gabaldon Classic - Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne Fantasy - Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin Chick Lit - Sushi for Beginners by Marian Keyes Thriller/Suspense - The Poet by Michael Connolly Fiction - The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini Humour - Jpod by Douglas Coupland
  • The only one I liked enough to recommend is 'To Kill A Mockingbird'. Great story, great movie. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Kill_a_Mockingbird http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0056592/ The second one is the movie.
  • umm lets see h wow, um i am a teen so these are ten books: 1. Sistehood series 2. The Clique series 3. alex rider series 4. this side of paradise 4. to kill a mocking bird 5. the bridge to teribithia 6. anything by margret peterson haddix 7. my sister's keeper 7. the princess diaries series and anything else by Meg Cabot 8. The supernaturalist 9. the Diary of Ann Frank 10. Eragon I really hope you enjoy these books P.S. these are not listed in order of my favorite books, so pick and choose!
  • Hmm, I'm reading the Catcher in the Rye right now, it's really good. I also liked Alice's Adventures Through the Looking Glass, and Alice in Wonderland. The Book of God is also interesting, it's the Bible put in novel form. Makes it a lot less boring lol.
  • I would STRONGLY recommend "The Remains of the Day" to everyone. It is absolutely amazing. Also, one can never go wrong with Kurt Vonnegut.
  • To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee. Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen. Harry Potter,(6 books so far) JK Rowling. Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain. The Sun Also Rises, Ernest Hemingway. The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck. A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens. In Cold Blood, Truman Capote. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Ken Kesey. The DaVinci Code, Dan Brown. The Color Purple, Alice Walker. Dune, Frank Herbert. A Separate Peace, John Knowles. Go Tell It on the Mountain, James Baldwin. The Invisible Man, Ralph Ellison. That's just the tip of the iceberg!
  • The Restraint of Beasts by Magnus Mills Behind the Scenes at the Museum by Kate Atkinson
  • A piece of cake by cupcake brown
  • First off, the Bible, a little bit each day. I have read through the Bible nine times now. Outside of that, how about a mix that includes: “The World is Flat” the ultimate book in understanding the effects of Globalization by three time Pulitzer Prize winning author Thomas Friedman. In American History: “John Adams” by David McCullough which earned McCullough his second Pulitzer Prize in a row. Also, Lewis & Clark: Voyage of Discovery by Stephen E. Ambrose If you want to know how America was explored, this is the book. I think for someone who lives outside of the United States in particular, this is a wonderful way to discover America. In Non-fiction, "Cold Mountain" by Charles Frazier. It is set at the end of the American Civil War and is a true romance that makes you ache. The true "star" in the story though is the Smokey Mountains of Western North Carolina. You feel as if you are there. From the opening of the book you are drawn into the story. It has been a long time since I have been made to feel like that.
  • The Dice Man. By Luke Rhinehart. Has anyone else read this?
  • I am a voracious reader, but yours is a difficult question. No one has the same favorites. I can't bear too much technical stuff, but I need it near for reference. I like to read to escape so I go for fantasy and science fiction first. Some people don't believe in wasting time on fiction. Just try stuff out. I like to find an author I like, then get as much of their work as I can. (And when I get everything I want to chain them to their typewriter!) I wish you pleasure in your search.
  • I like: The witch family Ginger Pye Eragon and Lots of others! Leave me a comment if you have any questions.
  • There are many I would reccomend, but may of those are either on other's lists or are lirature and have been done to death, so that takes my list down to one. Coraline by Neil Gaiman.
  • I remmend: Twilight By Stephanie Meyers Catcher in the rye was pretty good Breathing Lessons by Anne Tyler was a corky fun book
  • I loved the Kite Runner, check it out, its a great book.
  • Eragon, and Eldest All the legend of Drizzit series.
  • Any book written by Ann Rule. She is without a doubt the best true crime writer.
  • Noughts & Crosses - Malorie Blackman My Bloody Life - Reymundo Sanchez The Kid - Kevin Lewis Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte The Witches - Roald Dahl The Cement Garden - Ian Mcewan i could go on but that wouldnt be a good idea, sorry if i repeated any of the books anyone else has said, i just skim read the comments left :)
  • Garfield Calvin and Hobbes Bloom County Boondocks Farside and Over the Hedge
  • If I could only ever read one more in my lifetime it would be "The Shipping News" by Annie Proulx. Fantastic - a work of art.
  • I just got through with Saints by the River by Ron Rash. Really enjoyed it.
  • I think: Eragon & Eldest:christopher paolini priestess of the white:Trudi Canavan The worlds end & darkest hour:Mar Chadbourn Sabriel, Lireal & Abhorsen:Garth Nix Shades Children:Garth Nix Key to the Kingdom, Monday, Tuesday, Wednsday & Thursday:Garth Nix The Darktower series:stephen king Harry Potter series:J.K rowling how's that?.
  • That SOOOO depends on what you like to read. I read eclectically, and I read very fast, so I could recommend books, but without a few qualifiers, that list would be hundreds of books long. Horror: Laurell K. Hamilton-writes about a parallel world where all our 'myths' actually exist. Combo of horror/romance, her 2nd series, and later half of her 1st series are heavy on romance/sex in between the graphic violence. Jim Butcher-main character is a wizard. (These are the only two I can recommend, because I don't like horror.) Sci-fi: David Weber-his Honor Harrington series. Lois Bujold-her Miles Vorkosigan series. David Weber with John Ringo: March Upland, March to the Sea, March to the Stars, We Few Manga:(series) Hana-Kimi -written by Hisaya Nakajo 50 Rules for Teenagers Fruits Basket Ranma 1/2 The Hopeless-Savages (there are lots more that are also very good) Romance: Jayne Ann Krentz-she writes light-hearted, believable romance. She has over 100 bks. Elizabeth Lowell-a little darker. Also prolific. Julie Garwood-light hearted historical romance Johanna Lindsey-light hearted, rather humorous, historical and fantasy/sci-fi? romance. Simple Jess-by Pamela Morsi Lynn Kurland-writes historical or some time-travel romance spiced with humor. Not all light-hearted. (Stopping here on the romance because I can think of too many.) Non-fiction: Ellen Gould White- a religious author who wrote many books on the Bible, health, and religion. The dictionary, as comprehensive a one as you can find. I think I have like 8+. Fantasy: The Thief, The Queen of Attolia, The King of Attolia Patricia Wrede's 'dragon' series Anne McCaffrey's 'dragon' series A Plague of Sorcerers and its companion book by Zambreno Diana Wynne Jones-her 'griffin' series, and her Crestomanci series Crown Duel, Court Duel and anything else by Sherwood Smith Alanna the Lioness, and anything else by that author Vivian Vande Velde-a shivery note to her fantasies Andre Norton-prolific, she is considered by many authors to be the 'mother' of good fantasy Mercedes Lackey-a good eye for detail, and engaging stories Anne Bishop's Dark Jewels series, and Sebastian (and so many more, its hard to stop) Humor/fantasy: Terry Pratchett-writes the disc-world novels Piers Anthony's Xanth novels Western: Zane Grey-gets more into the traumas of what-ifs Louis L'amour-a VERY good storyteller, besides his westerns, he also writes short stories from around the world Mystery: ?(Can't remember just now ...) Adventure: (Usually subdivided into other genres) White Fang and other books by Jack London, although more like real-life adventures, usually the kind you wouldn't like to have. Odysseus's story-The Odessy (?) [If you can give me a catagory, I'd be happy to give a more detailed list....Really! LOL]
  • Did you ever read Anne Rice's Sleeping beauty? She wrote it under a different name. It's pretty racey!
  • I suggest the Pendragon and Eragon series. You might like the Cirque Du Freak series to.
  • "Mists of Avalon," Marion Zimmer Bradley. Any of the St. Germain series by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro; combines suspense with fantasy. Have fun!
  • If you're into apocalyptic novels, Swan's Song is great. So is The Stand, by Stephen King. Some of the most suspensful books I've read are real life lost at sea accounts. Adrift is among the best. Anne Rice's Interview with the Vampire was spellbinding to me (please don't confuse it with the movie).
  • Hidden Talents by David Lubar. Yea, I read it when I was in the fifth grade but I liked the book. If you like sci-fi-ish books, with a lot of humor and smart-asses.
  • Read the Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis. It's a seven book series that is loved by several generations and is exquisitely well written. The books take place with several children being transported to a magical land called Narnia, where they take on all sorts of adventures like rescuing lost princes and going on sea voyages to the end of the world. I love the books, although they were intended for children they make great reading at any age.
  • Common Sense and The Rights of Man - Thomas Paine The Ragged trousered Philanthropists - Robert Tressel The Art of War - Sun Tzu The Qu'ran The Bible Das Kapital - Karl Marx The God Delusion - Richard Dawkins Manufaturing Consent - Noam Chomsky All of these formed my opinions of the world around us. I highly recommend them
  • Dr.Phil's Books are good
  • 1984 by George Orwell Fall on Your Knees by Ann Marie MacDonald The Chronicles of Narnia (All of them!) by C.S. Lewis The Veritas Conflict by Shaunti Feldhan
  • A People's History by Howard Zinn
  • I love Mitch Albom books such as "Tuesday's With Morrie" and "The Five People You Meet in Heaven"
  • The Bourne Identity The Bourne Supremacy The Bourne Ultimatum All By Robert Ludlum
  • Anything by Terry Pratchett - but especially the Discworld books. Excellent stuff!
  • To Kill A Black Man Roots Malcolm X Biography
  • "The Traveller" (Fourth Realm Trilogy 1) by John Twelve Hawks is one of the best books I've read in ages. I picked it up & put it down 10 hours later when it was finished. I haven't done that with a book since I read the Dragonlance Chronicles by Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman when I was a teenager.
  • Anything by Terry Pratchett, why not start with The Colour Of Magic and work your way through the series.
  • the Bible
  • Choke By Chuck Palahniuk
  • My Sister's Keeper by Jodi Picoult- it's absolutely amazing
  • Anything by Terry Pratchett, my favorite is Equal Rites, try it :-)
  • The Alienist, by Caleb Carr.
  • God against the Gods by Jonathan Kirsch. Non-fiction and explains why things are the way that they are. Lies My Teacher Told Me by James Loewen. Should be required reading.
  • Boxy an Star is the best book ever.
  • All the Harry Potter books!
  • Try Consider Phlebas by Iain M Banks. It's a great SciFi novel which I believe will even appeal to people not into SciFi.
  • try a book called magical kingdom for sale, sold. by Terry Brooks. it is a really good book and an even better series! its a mythological book but its done in a realistic way so its not over the top. i love it and have read the series 3 times now!
  • The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time, it's an easy read yet incredibly well written.
  • If you like detailed books i like hot zone (richard preston) into the wild (dont know author) spirit white as lightening (dont know)
  • I like michael chrichton books
  • Ohhh I have SO many. I will try and keep the list short. The Celestine Prophecy - Don't remember the author The Kiterunner - Ditto Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown The Bark of the Dogwood - Jackson Tippet Mcrae Katzenjammer - Jackson Tippet Mcrae A Million Little Pieces - James Frey My Friend Leonard - James Frey Running with scissors - Augusten Burroughs Dry - Augusten Burroughs I think that should last you for a while ;)
  • I guess it depends on your tastes...
  • a child called it....by dave peltzer VERY good book! Its the first book out of a collection of 3. I suggest reading all of them....
  • Bag of Bones by Stephen King
  • The Book of Mormon
  • Anything by Stephen King really..
  • Anything by Chuck Palahniuk.
  • The God Delusion, by Richard Dawkins
  • The Stand by Stephen King and Insomnia by Stephen King. Actually, I'd recommend everything by Stephen King!!!
  • Night, but Elie Wiesel http://www.nightthebook.com/
  • Non-fiction "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" by Dee Brown. Want to know the history of the American Indian? Here it is. Fiction: “Cold Mountain” by Charles Frazier. A sweeping romantic novel of a shell shocked confederate soldier who deserts and heads for home in the North Carolina mountains. He looks out a large window of the Richmond hospital that he is in and imagines himself outside and free. He climbs through the window and he is. What a ride as the reader goes on with him.
  • Pilgrim, by Timothy Findley About a man that cannot die, and how he sees the world at different era's in history Slaughter-House 5 by Kurt Vonegut About a man that has been un-stack in time, meaning he can time travel
  • "naked lunch" by william s. burroughs "catch 22" by joseph heller and pretty much anything by hunter s. thompson those are my favorites!!!!
  • Yesterday I read "The Little Prince". (By Antoine de Saint-Exupery) It's less than 90 pages so it's a quick read but it's a parabole, so you'll probably need to read it a few times to fully understand it. It's amazing!
  • Some of my favourite classics (which everyone should read in their life time, really) include: 'To Kill a Mockingbird' by Harper Lee 'Catcher in the Rye' by J.D Salinger 'Catch 22' by Joseph Heller '1984' and 'Animal Farm' by George Orwell For more modern authors, Terry Pratchett is my personal favourite although you have to be quite interested in fantasy novels and understand English humour to enjoy his books. I recently read 'The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid' by Bill Bryson. The book recounts the author's childhood in 1950's America. It's a light jovial tale that is both hilarious and fascinating. I would honestly recommend it to anyone no matter their taste in books.
  • Janet Evanovich and Sue Grafton inject humor into mystery type stories - they're both GREAT. Mary Higgins Clark isn't as good a writer, but she tells GREAT stories.
  • Its hard to recommend without knowing what type of thing you like, however: Emily Barr writes great travel/mystery/modern womens fiction. Lisa Jewell for modern romance. Val McDermid for crime. Jodi Picoult for brilliant fiction that pulls at your heartstrings and makes you think. Dean Koontz for brilliant books (he's my favorite). Books I've loved are: The Man Who Turned into Himself by David Ambrose My Best Friends Girl by Dorothy Koomson Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistlestop Cafe His Dark Materials (trilogy) by Phillip Pullman I'm something of a bookworm, can you tell? Happy reading!!!! x
  • Jane Austin Agatha Christie Dean Koontz Stephen King Robin Cook, early works Michael Crichton William Shakespeare Anne Rice, any of her early work J.R.R. Tolkien C.S. Lewis Jules Verne Edgar Rice Burroughs H.G. Wells Lawrence Sanders Charles Dickens Emily, Anne, and Charlotte Bronte Nathaniel Hawthorn Edith Wharton, "The Age of Innocence" Harper Lee, "To Kill a Mockingbird"
  • Orson Scott Card Frank Herbert Michael Crichton Ray Bradbury Isaac Asimov Richard Feynman JK Rowling Bertrand Russell Franz Kafka Fyodor Dostoevsky
  • If you enjoy a sweeping historical novel covering thousands of years that gives you information as well as entertainment look up James A Michener. Give a miss to 'Space' though. Anything by Wilbur Smith gives a good read as well as an insight into the mindset of people living in Africa. The James Herriot series of books is full of humour and a vision of British life in the immediate pre and post war years. My absolute favourite books are the C S Forrester Hornblower novels, but you would probably have to have an understanding of the way that sailing boats work to get the most from them. If you enjoy history the novels of Phillipa Gregory give a wonderful insight into English Mediaeval history while entertaining at the same time. If you like science fiction then Isaac Asimov has got to be your man and for fantasy have a look at Terry Pratchett. Iain Banks and Iain M Banks (the same author, but writing in different genres) is sometimes spell-binding and sometimes difficult to keep up with, but always beautifully written. Oh, what the hell, just grab a book and read it.
  • well right now I'm reading all the V.C. Andrews series and am liking them. Some I had read years ago - but I'm trying to go through them all.
  • Perfume history of a murderer by Patrick Suskind Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson The picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert Crime and punishment by Fedor Dostoievski Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  • Some suggestions that haven't been suggested in the other answers: Georges Perec Italo Calvino Milan Kundera Gunter Grass Jorges Luis Borges Julio Cortazar Gabriel Garcia Marquez Christopher Isherwood Bruce Chatwin Beowulf Sir Gawain and the Green Knight George Mackay Brown Alasdair Gray
  • Ashes in the Wind - Kathleen Woodiwiss Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen The Promise - Danielle Steele
  • As our resident non-fiction geek, here are two that I've read lately that were *very* informative and interesting: Confessions of an Economic Hit Man The Secret History of the American Empire: Economic Hit Men, Jackals, and the Truth about Global Corruption both are by John Perkins.
  • Hey there hairly M&M, try some After the Magic Goes Away and Ring World (Larry Niven), The "Foundation" series by Issac Asimov, "John Carter of Mars" series by Edgar Rice Burroughs, and for pure pulp junk, Remo Williams, The Destroyer. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remo_Williams
  • I'd recommend Romance of the Three Kingdoms by Lo Kuan-chung....ya know, if you're into Ancient Chinese literature.
  • J.K. Rowling Dan Brown Cornelia Funke Daniel Defoe Charles Dickens Jhumpa Lahiri
  • anything by len deighton or bernard cornwell
  • Idne already touched on him, but, Dean Koontz is the best author going these days, for me. He is a fantastic mystery/suspense/fiction/kinda sci-fi/kinda horror author. And, please don't judge him by the handful of not-so-good movies based on his books. As is the norm, the books are a hundred times better than the movies. He has written 50 or more, but I recommend "Darkfall", "Phantoms", and "Strangers" to start.
  • Most people have left good book & author lists. Here's an author I didn't see who may be the finest serious writer in the US today. Cormac McCarthy -- "Blood Meridian", "The Road", many others. Here's a book that I am reading right now that seems as though it is going to be a good, serious novel: Kalookie Nights, Howard Jacobson
  • 1) Stephen King 2) Dan Brown 3) A Book called Decipher(cant remember author)
  • Cormac McCarthy is one of the greatest authors writing today. I agree. In addition to Blood Meridian and The Road, you can read Outer Dark, Child of God, No Country for Old Men. He writes flowing, poetic sentences. His subject is life and death.
  • Although I agree with Pathfinder on cormac McCarthy, I would add still another author to the list. Paul Auster: New York Trilogy, Leviathan, In the country of Last Things, Art of Hunger, Moon Palace, Music of Chance--and many others. Pathfinder left our McCarthy's famous, All the Pretty Horses. Don't forget Milan Kundera. Now you have a good starting list for contemporary novelists.
  • Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
  • Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myer and War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy. And Hot Zone by Richard Preston.
  • White Hell of Pity by Nora Lofts.
  • Anything by Stephen King or Dean Koontz.
  • "From the Corner of His Eye" - Dean Koontz "The Testament" and "Street Lawyer" by John Grisham I'm currently reading "Richochet" by Sandra Brown

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