ANSWERS: 30
  • You want it to blow the warm air back down is how mine is set up and it seems to work nicely. We have a very high cathedral ceiling and the warm air seems to all collect up there. We send the warm air down and can feel it.
  • It depends on the fan blades. Most fans offer a switch so that you can redirect the fan. Make sure the air is blowing down to stir the hot air above.
  • Heh, geeky answer coming up... (heating one room only) Assuming you have some kind of radiator, e.g electric fire, it needs to turn towards the heater. This will disrupt the convection currents (the way the heat moves around the room) and hopefully make the heat gather in one area of the room rather than escape. x = the heater f = the fan d = door x....f....d here it should turn anticlockwise to keep it away from the door. If it turns clockwise it will be sent towards the door and totally waste it all... Have fun with your fan & i think this is right...it's how we have it at the Centre.
  • It's simple.. hot air rises and cold air falls.. so if you have the heat on.. switch the fan to run counter clockwise. it will blow the air into the celing and make it circulate in the room. :D
  • it depends if you live in north america or australia.
  • heat rises so i guess you would make it go clockwise/blowing down?? why would you use the fan in the winter anyway though?
  • Winter set up...CLOCKWISE To get the most out of your ceiling fan this winter, make sure that you have your blades spinning in a clockwise direction. If your fan is mounted on a high ceiling you may need a step ladder or 8 foot ladder to actually get up into the fan and reverse the direction of the switch. If you have a wall control for the ceiling fan, you will also want to adjust the blade speed to the slowest spin.
  • why would you ask that question?
  • In the winter it is still good to circulate air, so this is a good question. People usually rotate their fan blades so that they do not feel the air blowing on them during the colder season. Even though warm air rises, it still feels cool if you are under it. I think for most fans, if you are looking up at them, you would want them to rotate clockwise, but it depends on the way the blades are tilted. What you want is for the lower side of the blades to lead so that the air is forced upward.
  • Here's the technical answer.Stand away from the fan and look at the tip (end) of a blade. If it looks like this (left side higher than the right side), it should rotate counter clock wise (CCW). That is viewing the fan from directly underneath looking up.So the following shows the ''tip'' angle (pitch) and the direction it should spin --WINTER: = () CCW -- (/) = CW --SUMMER: = ()CW -- (/) = CCW The reasoning behind this is that in the winter you will push the hot air down and in the summer pull the cool air up. In reality unless your ceilings are 30 feet high and the room is the size of a basketball court, it doesn't really matter. The fan will mix the air and provide a uniform temp. no matter which way it spins.
  • Yes, but not right from the store. You must remove some because it expands as it freezes. Skim or lowfat milk, when thawed, will have more of a "before frozen" consistency. Whole milk will, when thawed, have a "graininess" due to the separation of it's milkfat. This graininess affects only the way it feels in your mouth, but does not affect its taste or nutrition.
  • The correct answer is IT DOESN'T MATTER. Stirring up the air in a room with a ceiling fan keeps air evenly distributed and therefore, more even temperature thoughout a room. However, most experts say to circulate the air upward in the winter. The reason is because air moving upward in the center of a room follows the shape of the room...so it moves along the ceiling, then down the walls. Most heat registers are on or near the outer walls, so the effect will be that, as the air from the ceiling fan moves up, then out, then down the walls, it will circulate the warm air coming out of the heat registers into the center of the room. Plus, blowing air down in the winter may make some uncomfortable because the moving air can be felt--and who wants a fan blowing on them in the winter? Many other factors enter into play here, like quality of your insulation, etc. but for the most part circulating the air upward will provide the more desirable results in the winter.
  • I would think since heat rises you would want the wind flow to be blowing downwards. Counterclockwise!
  • Whichever way will move all the hot air convection sent up to the ceiling back down in to the room.
  • Clockwise! You want to push the heat from the ceiling down to the floor. Counter clockwise in summer to draw the heat from floor to ceiling.
  • depends on the angle of the blades - the heated air will rise, so pick the direction that pushes it back down by standing under the fan. hot air blowing on you? that's the direction you want it to turn.
  • clockwise!
  • the best way is to switch the button for winte or oppisite of what you have for summer. In winter the blades push the air up to allow the air to ciculate the hot air to come down.
  • anti clockwise to creat a warm air flow this helps if you have damp spots because the warm air constantly moves
  • it shouldn't
  • it should be rotating so that the air is pushed down, but you will hve to look at your fan and decide
  • Im not shure you even need it on in the winter.
  • It depends on which way your blades are installed. you want the fan to turn in the direction that pushes the air down. Heat rises, so this will pull the hot air down.
  • It doesn't matter. Either direction will stir the air, pushing the heat down and pulling the cool up.
  • looking up at the fan it should rotate clockwise or the opposite direction then if it was blowing air down, and I beleive that is clockwise. It should suck air up in winter and blow down in summer.
  • In the summer make sure the blades are spinning clockwise and in the winter counter-clockwise.
  • Counter clockwise. I think.
  • If you wish to bring warm air down from the upper areas of your home, an overhead fan should rotate counter-clockwise.
  • DEPENDS, WHEN YOU TURN IT ON AND STAND UNDERNEATH IT AND FEEL THE AIR, THATS GOOD FOR WINTER.
  • because all the blades in every fan are shaped at an angle the same,going anti clockwise cools the room while you switch the button to reverse it clockwise to draw the heat for the coldness in winter

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