ANSWERS: 5
  • LOL..I thought you invented it :)
    • roxellbelo
      Hahaha me too!
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blah This may be of sevice...
  • Origin: 1920–25, Americanism; redupl. of blah Also, blah-blah. http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=blah-blah-blah&r=66 Blah: Early 20th century. An imitation of vacuous talk http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/features/dictionary/DictionaryResults.aspx?refid=1861591044 Origin: 1915–20; imit. —Synonyms 1. bunkum, humbug, hooey, eyewash, twaddle, bosh. http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=blah&r=66 "idle, meaningless talk," 1918, probably echoic; the adj. meaning "bland, dull" is from 1919, perhaps infl. by Fr. blasé "bored, indifferent." The blahs "depression" is first attested 1969. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=blah In English, blah is a word that is sometimes used as an expression for words or feelings where the specifics are not considered important to the speaker or writer. It is not often seen in formal writing, except when transcribing speech. It differs from a speech disfluency such as "um" or "er" in that blah is a word used deliberately to represent other words, rather than as an accidental or temporary interjection into speech. Blah is also used when the speaker cannot say what was intended. "Blah" is also mimed behind people's backs to suggest that they talk too much or that they talk about useless topics for no reason. "Blah" is a token word with no meaning of its own, usually used to illustrate generic, boring speech. It may be used to fill in blank space, or to replace another word or phrase. It's for this last purpose that blah is sometimes assumed to mean something negative because it is used to replace a word that may be unpleasant, but blah itself is neutral. If spoken aloud the tone can usually be used to determine the speaker's intent. "Blah" is also used within a compound noun, suggesting a psychological state or expressing an opinion; for example, February blahs describes a generally depressed condition during winter. It is also viewed as a word expressing indifference, or lack of a preference. It may also be used to imply that something is not impressive, or it is boring, bland, or without character. Several alternatives or variants of the word can be observed today, such as bleh, blech, bla, meh or bah, although some differences may be perceived in certain contexts. Generally these variants would only be used in place of blah to show unimportance, disgust or disinterest. The word used is typically left to individual preference. As of 1913, Webster's Dictionary had not listed this word. It appeared roughly between 1915-1920, meaning "idle, meaningless talk". Its meaning soon was also likened to "bland" or "dull". Collier's utilizes the term "blah blah" to label a tedious length speech on a subject. It was later used to reflect a depressive state in the late 1960s, first attested in 1969, and believed to have been influenced by the blues. Blah most of the time usually means blank thoughts or expressions. The word likely originated as an echoic, or onomatopoeia. In this case representing a block of speech that is drawn out, boring or vacuous enough, so that all that is heard is the repetition, "blah, blah, blah". As of 1913, Webster's Dictionary had not listed this word. It appeared roughly between 1915-1920, meaning "idle, meaningless talk". Its meaning soon was also likened to "bland" or "dull". Collier's utilizes the term "blah blah" to label a tedious length speech on a subject. It was later used to reflect a depressive state in the late 1960s, first attested in 1969, and believed to have been influenced by the blues. Blah most of the time usually means blank thoughts or expressions. The word likely originated as an echoic, or onomatopoeia. In this case representing a block of speech that is drawn out, boring or vacuous enough, so that all that is heard is the repetition, "blah, blah, blah". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blah http://poets.notredame.ac.jp/cgi-bin/wn?cmd=wn&word=blah high-flown style; excessive use of verbal ornamentation; "the grandiosity of his prose"; "an excessive ornateness of language" http://www.thefreedictionary.com/blah In Telugu, the word "Bhale" is used for rant, grandiosity, magniloquence, ornateness, grandiloquence, rhetoric, pompous or pretentious talk or writing.
  • 4-7-2017 It is a carryover from a Greek tradition, assuming that anybody who could not speak Greek was incapable of language and could only say "bar bar bar". That is why they called them "barbarians". Americans already have a word "bar" so we say "blah" instead.
  • It's a Donald Trump quote?

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