ANSWERS: 4
  • No, I don't. Do you?
    • Linda Joy
      Yes! I saw it online. Would you like for me to find it again? Wow, that's interesting! I'm getting different results this afternoon when I google. Did I post this today? Last night? Hmmm......
    • Linda Joy
      Here's one on education, but I need to sleep. https://gemreportunesco.wordpress.com/2012/11/09/the-bottom-ten-countries-for-female-education/
    • bostjan64
      There are probably different ways to determine the "best" place to live. A magazine that publishes articles about fashion and clothing might consider access to shopping centers as a major factor, whilst a magazine that focuses on women's athletics might take access to all-female gyms or exercise trails into account. A financial magazine would probably consider neither, and focus more on income and job benefits instead.
    • Linda Joy
      Yeah, this one was along the lines of equal opportunity and equal pay. It may have had more to do with education. It definitely had to do with the way I phrased the search.
    • Linda Joy
      This is not the same link I saw before, but it is a list of the worst: https://www.insider.com/worst-countries-for-women-2018-3
    • mushroom
      How bad was the USA before the 19th Amendment? If that representation solved any issues, why the push for the Equal Rights Amendment (first introduced in 1923) over the decades?
    • bostjan64
      Hi mushroom! I'm not entirely clear to whom your comment was addressed. I think that there are two ways to look at your question: How does the (insert time-frame here) USA compare with other countries now, and how does it compare with other countries from that contemporary period? The USA has often been ahead of the curve on political trends, with periods of falling behind. In 1878, when women's suffrage was introduced in congress, Italy was the only other country where women could vote. Prior to 1917, when the political movement swept the rest of the world, only Norway had began allowing it. But, by 1919, when the amendment passed in the USA, we were a couple of years behind the trend. It might also be worth noting that women had the right to vote in New Jersey between 1776 and 1844. Obviously, the ERA was never ratified by the states, mainly because of the Vietnam War. The amendment would have extended conscription to women.
    • Linda Joy
      I can't say I wasn't around then. I do find it amusing that women won the right to vote when they weren't allowed to vote. How did y'all loose that one? hahaha! But the whole farce of Democrats supposedly fighting for civil rights is laughable! They are the ones that blocked blacks from having these rights already guaranteed them in the constitution. Then acted like it was some kind of gift when they couldn't block it any longer! Pathetic!
  • America is best. Hands down.
    • bostjan64
      Doubt it. Income gap is too high, maternity benefits are below average, crime is not the best... it's got to be some place more Nordic, like Iceland, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland, or even Canada.
    • Archie Bunker
      The gender pay gap is a myth, dude. Quit drinking the KoolAid and get the facts.
    • Archie Bunker
      .
    • Linda Joy
      Norway was #1! US was #3. But it didn't address all issues. Let me find a link. That's interesting! I'm getting different results on my google search today.
    • Archie Bunker
      Norway was the #1 place for women? Isn't that a matter of opinion?
    • bostjan64
      "Best country to live in" is totally subjective. Maybe Norway is the best, according to some set of metrics, but what if a particular person doesn't like lutefisk? LOL. As for "[t]he gender pay gap is a myth, dude," I won't disagree outright, but it is what is called a "perceived problem," which is what we call something that is based on factual observations and is said to be linked with one or more circumstances that are deemed by certain people to be problematic. In other words, there is a thing that exists, and it might or might not be the cause of some other things that exist that may or may not be unfair... and it's all rather foggy. The prevalence of the perception of the gender pay gap being a problem does, however, mean that it is very likely factored into the whatever article Linda Joy is referencing.
    • bostjan64
      Men do, on average, earn more salary (in terms of direct take home pay) than women do, which is a fact. What that means, in terms of fairness, is another topic for another conversation some other time.
    • Archie Bunker
      Men do, on average, work more hours (which increases take home pay) than women do, which is a fact. One of the multitude of reasons why people think that there is a gender pay gap. And the reason that there is a prevalence of the perception of the gender pay gap is that people are uninformed and listen to the media blather on about it without getting all the facts.
    • bostjan64
      Do you realize, that you went from "The gender pay gap is a myth, dude," to explaining why there is justification for the gender pay gap in a matter of a couple of hours?
    • Archie Bunker
      I'm glad to know that the explanation of why it is a fallacy went completely over your head. Congratulations.
    • Linda Joy
      Lol so true Archie! He doesn't listen at all!! He's too intent on proving he's right and everyone else is wrong. I'll admit his facts are usually true but they don't always relate to the issue at hand - other people just make stuff up and post it.
    • bostjan64
      Archie: "America" Bostjan: "I doubt it" - lists reasons why, says it's probably a Nordic country. Archie: It's a myth, disrespectful colloquialism about lack of critical thinking skills. Bostjan: Comment about how it's subjective. "I won't disagree" Archie: Mentions that there are a multitude of reasons why thing that was claimed to be a myth in a put-down directed at Bostjan exists. Bostjan: Points out the clear contradiction between the thing being a myth and the thing having a multitude of reasons why it exists. Archie: Another put-down. Linda Joy: Dogpiles on Bostjan.
    • Archie Bunker
      Bostjan: still trying to make sense of where he went wrong
    • bostjan64
      Archie: "Bostjan: still trying to make sense of where he went wrong" Oh, no, not at all. You guessed "America." I thought probably not, given the context of the question, and guessed a Nordic country. Turns out, that in that regard, I was indeed correct and you were wrong. Beyond that, everything is just sour grapes spilling over from another question where I disagreed with you and Linda Joy, and both of you started behaving like schoolyard children, in spite of the fact that we agree more often than disagree. But whatever - have your little tirade and get it out of your system, so we can go back to the regularly scheduled programming.
    • Archie Bunker
      64, I don't think you can claim you're right since this is a subjective question and I gave a subjective answer.
    • Linda Joy
      But he will. He's always right in his mind. And accusing us of what he's doing! Oh this is funny! I seldom agree with you and I'm libertarian!
  • Depends what she wants. For example the Middle Eastern countries are the best for women who want to run businesses. It has the highest proportion of women in top level professional jobs. The worst is probably the USA; as not only are women paid less than men, but a woman is twice as likely than a man to be a victim of crime, homicide or abuse.
    • Archie Bunker
      Do you mean the Middle East where women aren't allowed out by themselves? Or have to keep covered from head to toe or risk being stoned to death? That Middle East? And as far as the US is concerned, the gender pay-gap is a myth based on flawed logic. And actually men are more likely to be victims of violent crime and homicide. Men are more likely to commit suicide. Men are more likely to be in imprisoned.
    • Linda Joy
      Wrong again, jism! We're not even on the list: https://www.insider.com/worst-countries-for-women-2018-3
    • Linda Joy
      Worst countries in the world to be a woman: "The results are in, and topping the list are Afghanistan, DR Congo, Pakistan, Somalia and India, based on a variety of factors including rape and violence, lack of health services, poverty and human trafficking. According to the poll, Afghanistan ranks as the worst place in the world to be a woman. Women in today’s Afghanistan daily face a host of threats, from insurgent violence; attacks on schoolgirls and working women for daring to venture out into the public sphere; high levels of rape and domestic violence, as well as widespread physical and sexual abuse by state forces; forced and child marriage; and honor killings. 87% of Afghan women are illiterate, while 70-80% face forced marriage, many before the age of 16. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which ranked second on the list of the worst places to be a woman, an ongoing war has featured a brutal and strategic campaign of sexual violence targeted at women, from toddlers to the elderly. Armed militias and members of state forces are notorious for brutal gang rapes as well as sexual and human trafficking. Women who survive or escape bear a social stigma in their families and communities, or worse suffer from fistula, a painful and embarrassing tearing of the wall between the vaginal and rectal canals. In addition to conflict-related violence, which is largely associated with the easternmost provinces, a recent analysis of a 2007 household survey finds more than 1,100 women are raped every day in the Congo, nationwide. This tally accounts for both domestic violence and conflict-associated rapes; spousal rape is not criminalized in the DRC. Pakistan, India and Somalia ranked third, fourth and fifth, respectively, due to high rates of domestic violence, female infanticide (which is estimated to have resulted in up to 50 million girls are thought to be “missing” over the past century), female genital cutting, acid attacks and economic discrimination. The inclusion of economic discrimination as a form of violence is of particular note; although women comprise 70 percent of the world’s poor (which is widely acknowledged to be a violation of human rights and dignity), it is not always remembered as a form of violence. However, many manifestations violence against women can be traced to roots in poverty, such as the tradition of forced marriage by families seeking to alleviate debt (widely practiced in Afghanistan and Pakistan), the sale of girl children into sex slavery (common in India), and maternal mortality rates associated with lack of access to healthcare."
  • I would say China, which for a period of 30 years enforced a one-child policy with threats of fines, prison, forced abortion and sterilization, had little regard for girls and women. Though the policy did not specify gender, a preference for boys meant many millions of "excess" girls were hidden and whisked out of the country for adoption in the West. This is not a country ravaged by war, starvation or disease but a prosperous nation that had no regard for the value of those children in their own country. China amended the policy in 2016 to permit two children and since then many more girls have been adopted domestically.
    • Linda Joy
      That's bad, for sure. But they are not on the list either. I guess they figured that's not as bad as Afghanistan, DR Congo, Pakistan, Somalia and India, for the reasons I posted in the above post on jism's answer.

Copyright 2018, Wired Ivy, LLC

Answerbag | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy