ANSWERS: 5
  • no, i didnt even know that
    • ARTICFOX700
      I'm more interested in all the craters the moon has from asteroids hits, if one hits it it must go out of orbit and create all kinds of mess on earth
  • That is why they appear to be the same size in the sky. There are many such coincidents.
  • Since the Moon orbits Earth, it is the Earth's distance from the Sun which is more significant, putting us in a relative sweet spot for light and heat. It's hard to say how those circumstances play out in other star systems, since we have yet to locate a probe 1/20,000th the distance to the next nearest star (the Centauris). To say symmetry has something to with the favorable conditions on Earth may have merit, but we have only a sample set of 1 to study.
  • The radius of the Moon is 400 times the radius of the Sun, but the distance to the Sun is only 388 times the distance to the Moon, so it's not really "exact." "Darn close," though. There are a lot of things like this in astronomy, where things tend to repeat patterns. Bode's Law (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titius%E2%80%93Bode_law) predicted the distance of the asteroid belt and Uranus to within less than 2% error through basic numerology in the pattern of where the known planets seemed to lie. But the prediction fell apart for Neptune. Now that we are aware of hundreds of planets in other star systems, it is pretty clear that the two accurate predictions of Bode's Law were probably just dumb luck, since the law doesn't seem to apply to anything else in the universe. It does make me wonder, though, how many places there are in the universe where both total stellar and total lunar eclipses can occur. The Earth might be unique in that. Furthermore, because the Moon is slowly drifting away from the Earth, there will be a time many years from now, when the Earth will no longer witness total solar eclipses.
  • How would anybody but God know that?
    • mushroom
      God gave us the ability to question and reason. With that, we developed exploration, discovery and science. We learn something new to us every day, even if those things are billions of years old.
    • Flamingo
      Oh haha
    • Flamingo
      Oh haha

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