ANSWERS: 11
  • The Great Sphinx is an international symbol of mystery and controversy. It is one of the worlds oldest statues, and the worlds largest, yet we do not know for sure basic things such as who the face is, and when exactly it was built, and by whom. These mysteries have earned it the title "Riddle of the Sphinx", a nod to its Greek namesake, although this phrase should not be confused with the original Greek legend. It is generally thought to be a portrait of the Pharaoh Khafre (also known by the hellenised version of his name, Chephren), which would place its construction in the Fourth Dynasty (2723 BC–2563 BC). Some say that it was built after the pyramid of Chephren was complete. It may have been set as a sort of scarecrow to guard his tomb. Still others say it is the face of his guardian deity, rather than Chephren himself. However, the idea that the face is that of Khafre is only based on the fact that his pyramid is behind the Sphinx when coming from modern Cairo; the political center of Ancient Egypt was Memphis, south of the Giza plataeu. When approching from Memphis the Sphinx is seen in profile in front of the Great Pyramid of Khufu, who shares more physical similarities with it and was built by his son. When compared with statues of Khafre at the Cairo Museum, it is evident that the face on the Sphinx is different from the face on the statues. Other theories exist. In 2004, French Egyptologist Vassil Dobrev announced the results of a 20-year re-examination of historical records and uncovering of new evidence that suggest the Great Sphinx is the work of a forgotten Pharaoh named Djedefre, Khafre's half brother and a son of Khufu, the builder of the Great Pyramid. He suggests it was built by Djedefre in the image of his father Khufu, identifying him with the sun god Ra in order to restore respect for their dynasty. Alternative dating theories Water erosion In recent years some researchers have suggested that the pattern of water erosion allegedly evident on the body of the Sphinx suggests that it was actually built around 10500 BC (which is the last time any significant volume of rain fell in Egypt), and appropriated or remodelled by Khafre, but this view is not accepted by the mainstream of archaeology. Constellation of Leo The lion indicates the constellation of Leo. In 10,000 BC on the day of winter solstice the sun used to rise exactly between the paws of the sphinx. It was also the time when the equinox point was in the constellation of Leo. The Great Sphinx was possibly built to commemorate this event. One theory claims that the Sphinx was originally a lion statue whose head became damaged somehow. The head may have been replaced thousands of years later by the Egyptians, which could explain why the head is disproportionate with respect to the body Reference Links: http://www.explore-places.com/world_geography/G/Great_Sphinx_of_Giza.html http://interoz.com/egypt/sphinx.htm
  • The Great Sphinx was "not built" - it was carved in two stages out of limestone :-) ------------------------- Many theories – here’s another. The most fascinating theory supporting the date of construction as 10,500 B.C., was put forth by two scientists, Robert Bauval and Graham Hancock. These two astrologers believe that the sphinx was built in 10,500 B.C. for different reasons than Schoch or Schwaller. Bauval and Hancock’s thesis is based upon their belief that the ancient Egyptians thought of Egypt as a heaven, making it a "earthly counterpart of the sky" with the Milky Way being the Nile River (Wilson, Colin 289). Their theory is centered around the way the stars, specifically the Belt of Orion and Leo the Lion, are arranged in the sky. The Belt of Orion is a mirror image of the pyramids of Giza, though not a perfect clone. The time when the pyramids were in perfect alignment with the Belt of Orion was when it was at its lowest point, in 10,450 B.C.(Wilson 86). Bauval and Hancock argue that in order for the pyramids to be in the exact arrangement of the Belt of Orion, the plans for their construction would have had to been made long before they were built. Bauval and Hancock believe it was planned in 10,500 B.C. by the builders of the Sphinx. Bauval and Hancock’s theory also states that the Sphinx was built during this time as a marker for the age of Leo, whose animal is the lion(Wilosn 280). Bauval and Hancock believe the relationship between the stars and the structures on the Giza plateau, is a message telling the when the sphinx was built from the builders of the sphinx to the builders of the Great Pyramid ("The Sphinx" 2). The date the Egyptians first arrived in Egypt is a controversial subject which might be resolved if more is discovered about the Sphinx. The date of the Sphinx’s construction is a very debatable issue that if confirmed, will either verify the current theories or abolish the present conjectures. Although there are many speculations that support the date of 10,500 B.C. for the Sphinx’s date of construction, these theories are not proven and do not provide a stable background to determine 10,500 B.C. as a documented date. Researchers continue to look for answers but the one thing that will provide an unlimited amount of information and facts is if the chambers beneath the Sphinx are dug up. People in the U.S., Britain, and Australia are pushing for rights to excavate the Sphinx, accusing the Egyptian government of "hiding possible findings that could be of great importance to all members of the human race" (Jehl 2). Hopefully this will happen within the next couple years and the many mysteries about ancient Egypt will be answered. http://www.ccds.charlotte.nc.us/History/Egypt/save/payne/payne.htm
  • I think the Great Sphinx was built because mashed potatoes are yummy for llamas. Pharaoh Khafre had 4 pet llamas and they all like vegetables especially potatoes. Khafre's servants mashed them with medium sized rocks and the llamas ate them happily.
  • The sphinx is the result of an artist trying to draw manbearpig, but horribly messing up.
  • a guy got drunk one day saw a lion and a ram and started to build
  • From: http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/23193 The Great Sphinx is an international symbol of mystery and controversy. It is one of the worlds oldest statues, and the worlds largest, yet we do not know for sure basic things such as who the face is, and when exactly it was built, and by whom. These mysteries have earned it the title "Riddle of the Sphinx", a nod to its Greek namesake, although this phrase should not be confused with the original Greek legend. It is generally thought to be a portrait of the Pharaoh Khafre (also known by the hellenised version of his name, Chephren), which would place its construction in the Fourth Dynasty (2723 BC?2563 BC). Some say that it was built after the pyramid of Chephren was complete. It may have been set as a sort of scarecrow to guard his tomb. Still others say it is the face of his guardian deity, rather than Chephren himself. However, the idea that the face is that of Khafre is only based on the fact that his pyramid is behind the Sphinx when coming from modern Cairo; the political center of Ancient Egypt was Memphis, south of the Giza plataeu. When approching from Memphis the Sphinx is seen in profile in front of the Great Pyramid of Khufu, who shares more physical similarities with it and was built by his son. When compared with statues of Khafre at the Cairo Museum, it is evident that the face on the Sphinx is different from the face on the statues. Other theories exist. In 2004, French Egyptologist Vassil Dobrev announced the results of a 20-year re-examination of historical records and uncovering of new evidence that suggest the Great Sphinx is the work of a forgotten Pharaoh named Djedefre, Khafre's half brother and a son of Khufu, the builder of the Great Pyramid. He suggests it was built by Djedefre in the image of his father Khufu, identifying him with the sun god Ra in order to restore respect for their dynasty. Alternative dating theories Water erosion In recent years some researchers have suggested that the pattern of water erosion allegedly evident on the body of the Sphinx suggests that it was actually built around 10500 BC (which is the last time any significant volume of rain fell in Egypt), and appropriated or remodelled by Khafre, but this view is not accepted by the mainstream of archaeology. Constellation of Leo The lion indicates the constellation of Leo. In 10,000 BC on the day of winter solstice the sun used to rise exactly between the paws of the sphinx. It was also the time when the equinox point was in the constellation of Leo. The Great Sphinx was possibly built to commemorate this event. One theory claims that the Sphinx was originally a lion statue whose head became damaged somehow. The head may have been replaced thousands of years later by the Egyptians, which could explain why the head is disproportionate with respect to the body Reference Links: http://www.explore-places.com/.../...hinx_of_Giza.html http://interoz.com/egypt/sphinx.htm
  • You put this under duplicates, so I assume you are trolling yourself for points by flagging it yourself.
  • Help yourself: http://www.google.co.nz/search?hl=en&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&hs=6Xb&sa=X&oi=spell&resnum=0&ct=result&cd=1&q=great+sphinx&spell=1
  • I found this site that describes it well: The Great Sphinx is believed to be the most immense stone sculpture in the round ever made by man. However, it must be noted that the Sphinx is not an isolated monument and that it must be examined in the context of its surroundings. Specifically, like many of Egypt's monuments, it is a complex which consists not only of the great statue itself, but also of its old temple, a New Kingdom temple and some other small structures. It is also closely related to Khafre's Valley Temple, which itself had four colossal sphinx statues each more than 26 feet long. The material of the Sphinx is the limestone bedrock of what geologists call the Muqqatam Formation, which originated fifty million years ago from sediments deposited at the bottom of sea waters that engulfed northeast Africa during the Middle Eocene period. An embankment formed along what is now the north-northwest side of the plateau. Nummulites, which are small, disk-shaped fossils named after the Latin word for 'coin', pack the embankment. These were once the shells of now extinct planktonic organisms. There was a shoal and coral reef that grew over the southern slope of the embankment. Carbonate mud deposited in the lagoon petrified into the layers from which the ancient builders, some fifty million years later, carved out the Great Sphinx. To do so, they trenched out a deep, U-shaped ditch that isolated a huge rectangular bedrock block for carving the Sphinx. This enclosure is deepest immediately around the body, with a shelf at the rear of the monument where it was left unfinished and a shallower extension to the north where important archaeological finds have been made. The good, hard limestone that lay around the Sphinx's head was probably all quarried for blocks to build the pyramids. The limestone removed to shape the body of the beast was evidently employed to build the two temples to the east of the Sphinx, on a terrace lower than the floor of the Sphinx enclosure, one almost directly in front of the paws, the other to the south of the first one. It is generally thought that quarrying around the original knoll revealed rock that was too poor in quality for construction. Therefore, some visionary individual conceived of the plan to turn what was left of the knoll into the Sphinx. However, the Sphinx may equally well have been planned from the start for this location, good rock or bad. The walls of the Sphinx enclosure are of the same characteristics as the strata of the Sphinx body and exhibit similar states of erosion. The bedrock body of the Sphinx became a standing section of the deeper limestone layers of the Giza Plateau. The lowest stratum of the Sphinx is the hard, brittle rock of the ancient reef, referred to as Member I. All of the geological layers slope about three degrees from northwest to southeast, so they are higher at the rump of the Sphinx and lower at the front paws. Hence, the surface of this area has not appreciably weathered compared to the layers above it. Most of the Sphnix's lion body and the south wall and the upper part of the ditch were carved into the Member II, which consists of seven layers that are soft near the bottom, but become progressively harder near the top. However, the rock actually alternates between hard and soft. The head and neck of the Great Sphinx are made of Member III, which is better stone, though it becomes harder further up. http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/sphinx1.htm
  • i think God did it...kinda like a toy or something... maybe he just got bored one day
  • It was a guardian to the dead if I am correct.

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