ANSWERS: 19
  • How is one supposed to accurately measure racism? You can measure the extent to which it is insitutionalised, to a certain degree, but that is about it and drawing any meaningful comparisons between countries is not a task that can be done with conclusive results due to the nature and realities of racism. Not only is it not a measurable concept, but it is not one which is displayed openly and consistently. I have heard that the U.S. is the most racist country in the world, I have also heard that it is India. In truth, I believe both these arguments are BS. One can manipulate facts and assumptions to make a case either way, if he wishes.
  • I would imagine that the reason people may see the US as being more racist is because it has such a hugely diverse range of people and races, so the racism that does exist is more apparent. I'm sure there are people in all countries who have racist tendancies, but not everywhere else is as culturally diverse as you, so often those feelings aren't ever expressed towards a victim.
  • Africa is a fine example of Race in harmony, they just kill you to kill you there everyone is equal.
  • I don't think the US is the most racist country in the world. Cambodia, South Africa, the majority of the Middle East, they have fairly extensive histories of racial hatred towards their minorities, much worse than the US was guilty of. Cambodia had the Khmer Rouge, South Africa had the Apartheid, the Middle East has all their religious fighting (The Sunnis oppress the Shiites, the Shiites oppress the Sunnis, everyone oppresses the Kurds), not to mention however many more places where racial violence is/was prevalent. The US is far from innocent and I know that racism is diminishing in the world, but the fact still stands. The claims that the US is the most racist country in the world is far from the truth. It is just mindless, ignorent America-bashing, plain and simple.
  • So Unquestionably racist that you can't even dicipher between a person of Mixed Ethnicity and a Black man. Even when it's your own president.
  • Compared to the atrocities cause by racism in other countries, America has done quite well in terms of race relation -we don't have neo-nazis roaming the subways like they do in Russia -we don't have spectators at sporting events throwing bananas and whoop like monkeys at black players like they do in Europe -we don't have the xenophobic policies that Japan and South Korea have. -we have a black president for crying out loed. -In addition we have minority politicians.
  • Once you've been abroad you quickly realize that we hardly register on the Racism-O-Meter. In terms of integrating people of different ethnic backgrounds we do extremely well and this is something to be proud of. This is not to say that racial tension and racially related problems don't exist in the US, they certainly do, but they're not considered socially acceptable by the mainstream and the media. This is a big deal because in many countries, that's not the case. A past prime minister of Israel once referred to Palestinians as cockroaches. That would never happen here.
  • LOL. When I was little I used to think racism just meant you didn't like black people...lol. Well...as I got older and traveled through Europe a few times i realized that those little countries all talk shit on each other. It's interesting. "Oh you know those Italians...." "Ugh, those English people, they think they are so..." "Never trust a Belgian" lol
  • The USA, despite its problems and shortcomings, is pretty good compared to other countries when it comes to racism. Slavery was abolished and Blacks were given the right to vote in 1865, whereas in South Africa by comparison Apartheid and (Black) majority rule did not come until the 1990's. Many countries still have laws which enforce inequality based on race, gender, language, class or other such qualities, and many countries do not let the citizens participate in the process to change or repeal such laws.
  • I would consider it average-to-above-average. Germany, spain, UK, italy, israel, among many others I would consider to be more racist than the US.
  • im from england and when i was in america (chicago and new york)i was so shocked the different races lived in different areas thats some heavy sergration
  • After watching the film Crash I thought to myself "I'm never going to Los Angeles, ALL they talk about is race", but I know not to base my views just on one bad film, though the issue does seem to crop up quite a lot on this site in questions from the US. I think that there are probably quite a few countries tied in first place for this particular honour, and living in the UK I know that while there are plenty of non-racists here there are also plenty who are.
  • Out of all the first world countries I have been too the US is easily the most racist. No other country has racial segregation like you do in the US. However, compared to second and third world countries the US is no where near the worst in the world!
  • I am in the UK, and it is a pretty racist country. But from AB alone, America seems to be much worse. You seem to be obsessed with race. I hope it is something that both our countries can eventually come to terms with; it would be very nice to live in a place where race was just not a factor.
  • No freaking idea. No. Maybe. Usually it's someone who has never been to any other country. Sure as shit sounds like it.
  • let's see... has anybody told me that? no is it a bunch of bs? no is it true? probably yes... quote: "you can't trust Obama he's a nigger!"
  • 5-29-2017 "Apartheid" has no meaning in America. American cops do not destroy towns because gypsies live there. http://englishrussia.com/2016/05/31/russian-police-destroys-biggest-gypsy-village-in-russia/ No American church is trying to wipe out followers of any other church. America is doing fairly well regarding racism.
  • 7-16-2017 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGsY4vBYdYM This song is about 60 years old. Racism or bs, it has a lot of staying power.

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