ANSWERS: 19
  • It certainly shows wisdom in the person, as a person who pretends to know everything is fooling everyone including themselves, and misses out on the joys of learning. To me a person who asks questions is on a good path, of course if their questions are meaningful, not just aimed at arguing or to stir up trouble. We were all born wetting ourselves, and being fed by someone else. We should consider that we are only one out of billions of humans, and we don't know hardly anything really. We just read, understand, learn, teach, die. Such a sad waste if it was left at just that. Thankfully it isn't. There is so much to learn, we can learn forever and ever, and there is no end.
  • It depends on the quality of the questions of course. A person asking a lot of very basic or confused questions may appear unintelligent, whereas a person asking a lot of insightful and challenging questions may appear very intelligent. On the basis of my observations though people with inquisitive minds do tend to be intelligent. So I go with intelligent as a generalisation.
  • Could be they want to learn. Could also be that they want to deflect attention from themselves onto the other person and keep people knowing too much about their personal lives. I know one person who asks everyones opinion and then does exactly what he wants to do and another who is a very private person and asks so many questions that the other person never gets to know anything about them at all! Quite an interesting tactic if you can keep it up.<:)+5
  • I think that the more questions you ask, the more you learn! So in general I think it shows intelligence, but it can get a bit annoying if people question EVERYTHING!! :)
  • i think they are maybe looking to expand there intelligence.
  • Depends. Some authoritarians use hard questions, ones not likely to have a convenient answer, as a way to bully subordinates. Some people truly want to expand their knowledge. You'd have to analyse what they are asking to guess their true motive.
  • It can go either way, but listening is what smart people do, and asking questions sets the stage for listening.
  • I think curiosity is the hallmark of an active mind. George W. Bush was not curious. Whether he is intelligent or not is irrelevant. Curiosity is the door to knowledge..knowledge brings understanding..understanding bridges the gap among people. :)
  • Not always the case of course but just once in a while I find myself wondering if it is a ploy to get attention - as in - look at me, concentrate on me and give me attention. Their reaction to my answer is also another indication. Regards
  • I call them the 20q crew. I rub my eyes and say "I'm getting a migraine, or this is like the dog throw the ball he'll keep coming back" I know a bunch like that. Idiots I call them but they don't think so.
  • I just think they have a healthy curiosity
  • I think they are trying to interact so incourage it i say and is that really your pic ?
  • Well, I just think they're curious to learn something new as I do. I try to answer them as far I can. And I appreciate them.
  • Depends upon the questions ... if they're not just "nosey" questions, I think they're very interested and curious about things. Yes, I would say they're intelligent.
  • I think they have an inquireing mind.I passed science alone on my questions.If you dont know how to do something then why not ask some one who knows.Perhaps some one who continuously asks questions just for the sake of it could be deemed irritating.
  • I think it depends mostly on what the questions are... if it indicates anything it probably isn't intelligence but some other aspect of personality is out of whack
  • It does not have to do with intelligence. Questions generally come from people with an inquisitive mind.
  • i think they r dumb lol , joking , it has nothing to with inelligence , its just curiosity thats all i think so !!
  • Nearly 90% of people ask for interaction and to find the opinion of others. It is nothing to do with intelligence.

Copyright 2018, Wired Ivy, LLC

Answerbag | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy