ANSWERS: 18
  • You ever hear of the Three for One special?
  • Christian math is like christian science.
  • Hmmm... Father, Son and Holy Ghost. If all are God, then isn't that Monotheism?
  • It's magic. It's supernatural. It's ridiculous.
  • ok...I'll try a serious answer, though the silly ones were pretty good, I must admit. (And granted, this is not coming from a religious person in the least, just someone raised Catholic)....There is one God. Within God, there are 3 aspects: The Father (Which is the God folks traditionally think of, the master of the universe so to speak, the actual entity...also "father" as representative of His relationship to us), the Son (God's physical manifestation on earth, i.e. Jesus) and the Holy Spirit (The Essence of God that can be felt by all who are open to it.) Sort of like humans if you think about it, and if you're coming from a spiritual perspective. There is the physical human and the soul...two distinct yet singular aspects of self.
  • Caveat: I'm not a Christian, and I don't have any particular axe to grind on this issue. Having said that, your question arises from the misuse of generalizations, like so many philosophical and theological "paradoxes". According to Christian doctrine, God has three "aspects" -- i.e. he looks different from different perspectives. That's metaphorically similar to the old elephant parable, where the blind men each describe the elephant differently because of the part they happen to be touching. There's nothing incoherent or inconsistent about claiming that a single deity can have 3 distinct aspects. Lots of "objects" in the universe have different parts, or offer different views from different viewpoints.
  • Because they are "three in one." They are 3 persons in one entity andd we'll never totally understand it with our limited minds. It is like I can be a son, a husband, and a father---3 entities in one person.
  • I'm thinking it's more like three aspects of the same God. That's how I've always looked at it. I don't really have any better explaination or reasoning.
  • If I separate an egg, I have a shell, a white, and a yoke, but I still just have one egg.
  • God is a Spirit, you can't separate Him. Jesus is the name of God revealed in the New Testament. God has never changed since the Old Testament. That's why the Bible says,"Jesus Christ the same yesterday, today and forever." The book of Isaiah says referring to God He says that He will not "share His glory with another." The Bible also says that all of the fullness of the Godhead dwelt in Him Bodily referring to Jesus Christ. God or the Spirit of God was manifested in the man Christ Jesus. So there for since God is a Spirit He is only one God manifested in different ways. Father in Creation, the son in redemption, and the Holy Ghost or Holy Spirit same thing in regeneration. I hope this will help you.
  • I don't believe in the trinity, I have studied this for years. First Chapter of John, the being who became Jesus was the God of the "Old Testament" Until He came the being He called the Father was unknown. The Spirit is the force, life, and power of these beings. The belief in a trinity "Kills" the hope of joining this Family of God. Joining the Family, as sons and daughters of God, and being the very bride of Christ, was the message our Savior brought to us.
  • Cause it's a 3-headed monster
  • I was brought up Anglican Christian but im now an athiest/spiritualist , but but I was allways taught that the Hold Spirit, Jesus and the Farther were all the same person just in 3 forms all present. God is supposed to be 'omipresent' which means everywhere - (apart from in hell as some Christians think if they beleive in hell).
  • That is what is called The Holy Trinity. God in three persons the Blessed trinity.
  • The Catholic position is three divine persons, one divine substance. The "mono" obviously refers to the substance
  • it isn't. you ae referring to the doctrine of the trinity, that the bible does not teach. this doctrine was adopted by the catholic church hundreds of years after jesus and his faithful disciples of the first century had long died.
  • Monotheism is at the core of most major theistic religions. The faith most commonly associated with pantheism (everything is god) is what has come to be known (unfoundedly) as Hinduism. Yet even here there is evidence of pure monotheism which learned priests and scholars of that faith have acknowledged. However, this evidence lies buried in the scriptures of the faith. The priests of the faith, who one would expect to educate their followers about the truth of the scriptures, are ironically quite happy for the masses to remain ignorant about that truth. Christianity is rooted in Judaism and both faiths share the fact that their names too (like Hinduism) are not founded in their teachings. However, whereas Judaism has maintained the purity of its strict monotheistic belief, Christianity has, somewhere along the line, ended up muddying that purity with the concept of the Trinity. The Holy Qur’an (HQ), coming about 600 years after Jesus as the scripture for a faith it refers to as Islam, reinstates strict monotheism and makes it uncompromising with passages like HQ 112:1-4 “1 - Say: He is God, the One and Only. 2 - God, the Eternally Besought of all. 3 - He begetteth not, nor is He begotten. 4 - And there is none like unto Him.” There have been many attempts to justify the trinity as monotheistic with arguments such as the ones presented in many of the answers here. Some of the weaknesses of these arguments are touched on below: 1 The steam/water/ice comparison. > This breaks down because one becomes the other by complete transition (water becomes ice) whereas there is no such transition between the three Persons of the Trinity (the Father does not become the HS ). 2 It's metaphorically similar to the old elephant parable, where the blind men each describe the elephant differently because of the part they happen to be touching. > Fine, but that does not make the ear the elephant, the leg the elephant or the trunk the elephant whereas the Trinity belief insists that the Father IS God, the Son IS God and the HS IS God. 3 Lots of "objects" in the universe have different parts, or offer different views from different viewpoints. > Similar to 2 above 4 Within God, there are 3 aspects: The Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. > Simple, but Trinity doctrine insists each Person is God, NOT just an aspect. 5 if all are ONE God, isn't that Monotheism? > the “all are” gives the plurality away, also Trinity doctrine insists that EACH of the “all” is God 6 three divine persons, ONE divine substance. > similar to 5 above 7 the Holy Spirit, Jesus and the Farther are all the same (ONE) person just in 3 forms all present. > similar to 5 above 8 God is a Spirit He is only ONE God manifested in different ways. > similar to 5 above 9 If I separate an egg, I have a shell, a white, and a yoke, but I still just have one egg > the shell IS NOT egg, the white IS NOT egg, the yolk IS NOT egg. 10 it's more like three aspects of the same ONE God. > similar to 4 above 11 It is like I can be a son, a husband, and a father > similar to 4 above. Consider if someone hugged you the son he has hugged you the husband and you the father. 12 we'll never totally understand it with our limited minds > When people realise that there really isn’t any justification for their beliefs about God either in their own scripture or in reason they usually say something like ‘well, God surpasses our wisdom’. I have no problem with that because the bit that "surpasses our wisdom" is no concern of ours. That which we have not been given capacity to understand is clearly not meant for us. We will not be questioned for not believing what we don't understand, unless God is unjust. Some will boldly assert that the Trinity has its foundations in the OT itself when God uses words like “us” and “our” To make such an assertion is to confirm that the faith is not monotheistic. In any case the argument is flawed. The Jews who have regarded the OT as scripture for much longer than the Christians, do not see plurality in the “us” and “we”. Even in modern European languages like German and French, 'sie' and 'vous' (plural forms of 'du' and 'tu') are used for ONE person, to indicate formality/added respect. This tradition of using plurals to convey respect or exalted position is even stronger in Asiatic languages. The HQ, being in an Asiatic, Semitic language, has many instances of God using 'We' and “Us” but no Muslim would ever take that to indicate a plurality of God. The OT is from the same language family as the HQ so the same applies here as well, the plural when used in relation to God represents respect and majesty not numbers.
  • 1 X 1 X 1 = Monotheism

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