ANSWERS: 20
  • Well right now for me...i dont think so.im f**king hopeless.
  • When people lose hope that is generally a bad sign, since most suicides happen when people reach that point emotionally if they are depressed for whatever reasons. It's an individual opinion of course, but for me, if I gave up all hope, I would not want to live, no.
  • Are you glad that you were granted life? Are you completely healthy and well educated? Do you have hope, and are you motivated? Have you always had a home and plenty of food? Do you feel loved? If the answer to any of these questions is "Yes", then you still can hang on for better tomorrow. That’s ‘hope’.
  • Yes, every life is worth living and to be enjoyed at every moment. If someone is without hope, or someone recognizes signs of hopelessness it should be addressed with the person. I will do anything in my will power to try to make someone think twice before trying to end their life.
  • No. But I will submit to you that there is no such thing. There is hope as long as there is breath in your body. Of course, this statement is contengent on what you hope for. I will assume, correct me if I am wrong, that you speak of hope for happiness. In which case, happiness, contrary to popular opinion, has nothing to do with people, places and things in your life. "The wise know happiness even within the wildest of storms and adversity. The fool beholds the calm lands, and longs for hope without himself." by Unknown Author
  • As long as there's life, there's hope... Hang in there!
  • Yes, because hope can be reborn.
  • hope in one hand crap in the other wich one feels fuller. if you live on hope your dumb if you live on hard work and a drive to earn what you want then you may not live longer but your life will be worth living!
  • No, but is there such a thing? Is there such a thing as a life that has no hope? There's always hope, otherwise what do you have when things get rough and you are on your own?
  • We pretty much take it for granted that hope is an important part of life, and we fear losing hope; we fear despair. The underlying condition which makes us grasp for hope IS a sense of desperation or dissatisfaction about life as it is. We feel cut off from love, from freedom, from satisfaction, from meaning, ... really, we feel cut off from being truly ourselves, and that sense of being disconnected from the source of aliveness makes us cling to hope: any idea about how the future will somehow sweep in on it's white stallion and save us from our suffering. This is the famous "human condition" -- it's the condition religion is supposed to address, by providing the pathway and practices to reunite disconnected and separate individuals with the Whole (which you can call the Absolute, or Infinite, or Spirit, or God, or Ultimate Reality... in Zen we call it "true self") So for many people, religion is what provides the basis for their hope, and that's certainly a reasonable place to serve as a basis for hope. Ironically, though... hope may not be the great friend that we think it is. When we're in despair and suffering, hope tends to provide a sort of fantasy "escape route", which allows us to hold ourselves at arm's length from our pain and discomfort -- steeling ourselves for now in the hope that tomorrow will be better. But is that really the best way to relate to pain and suffering? I don't think so. In my experience, the best way to relate to suffering is to embrace it: to walk straight toward it, to look the Devil squarely in the eye and refuse to flinch. I've found that when I'm willing to do that, something always happens that one would never guess without personal experience: when you become one with your pain it transforms into something other than pain. As long as you try to stay separate from it, push it away, deny it, or even wallow in it for pity... as long as there is even 1/4 inch of separation between "me" and "suffering", it will persist. To MERGE with suffering completely produces the miracle of self-recovery. All forms of escape just make it shift shapes or go underground to lurk and attack later on. So in my book, hope is a delaying tactic: it's delaying our inevitable encounter with our own separateness and suffering, it's not-quite-being-ready to look the Devil in the eye. When you can dispense with hope and throw yourself directly into the middle of the fire... that's when you discover the *true* relief which obviates the need for hope.
  • In my opinion, no. I feel that once you lose hope and stop growing your life is essentially over. However, you can regain hope and you can start growing again. It doesn't have to be OVER.
  • No. But hope is a matter of outlook, there is no such thing as a life without potential to get better, hope is something *you* have to make for yourself, if you hope, your life has hope. Life can be rough at times, life is unfair, but the most you can do is stick two fingers up at the things and people that try to hurt you, and go off and live with some hope that things will get better. That's pretty much all you can do, and sometimes it just comes down to lashing out violently, but it's the most you can do when life throws you a curveball.
  • Most of these answers are people's definitions of what hope is; i think that without one's PERSONAL definition of whatever hope is to them, very few would wish to continue.
  • Antigone, you wrote this question months ago. I hope by now, your life has changed for the better. I know you appreciate the irony that I will say a prayer that peace, joy, security and fulfillment may soon make a home in your heart....RF ..in your fashion, please say a similar blessing for me. I need it. Thanks.
  • Sure it is. Sometimes the only way to get through life is to lose all hope for awhile.
  • In my opinion no.
  • I don't think so.
  • theres always hope
  • No, but you can always lie to yourself or keep praying and wait until you die naturally.
  • Yes,but you must find hope,or others will bring you down!

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