ANSWERS: 33
  • The correct response is to just say thank you. Some people will get mad if you use "happy holidays" instead of "merry christmas" because they mistakenly think that "happy holidays" is trashing on christmas. Doesn't matter what you do, some will find fault. Personally, I'd just say thank you and move on. Pleasant greetings are hard enough to come by these days without alienating people.
  • Hanukkah is not quite as comercialized as Christmas is...that is, people still equate it with Judaism, while anyone of any religion can celebrate Christmas in one way or another. Although that doesn't make much sense, I think that's how most people understand it.
  • People are stupid and tend to have double standards.. ignore them. I'm not Jewish, but Happy Hannukah
  • Good illustration of anti-semitism and why it is now politically correct to say "Happy Holidays." L'Chaim.
  • I'm not Jewish, but I would have said thank you and moved on.
  • Its quite possible that the people whom you wished a Happy Hanukkah were atheists and would have done the same if you said Merry Christmas. For those of us who are Christian, if we know anything about our religion, we are heirs of yours. Therefore, the polite thing to do would be to wish you a Happy Hanukkah too. Or, as a Jewish friend of mine used to do, a Happy Hanumas. I know, that might offend some, but it was his way of handling things in a lighthearted manner and I chose to accept it as such. By the way, Happy Hanukkah to you too.
  • Yes they should have done the same its the polite and right thing to do. i'm an atheist and when people say Merry christmas to me i just say thank you. I think theres no need to be rude about it saying Merry Christmas or Happy Hanukkah to someone else means you wish them well and want them to be happy on the holiday season thats all. Happy Hanukkah fun *hugs*
  • Because people are just idiots. Happy Chanukah & have a wonderful holiday
  • Season's Greeting, Doll. I've got enough "should" issues these days. Everybody, including the Hindus, Christians, Jews, Buddhists, Muslims, and Atheists can do what they like.
  • Funny how that works, isn't it? When people ask me about what size christmas tree they should get, I ask them what size blown up menorah I should put on my front lawn. [They usually stop at that point] I just say Happy Holidays. Everyone wins.
  • yes. its your why of saying marry christmas weather they like it or not.
  • Yeah life is not fair - i see your point - no they should not have done the same - you should tell them you are Jewish
  • Should they have done the same? I don't think so. To me - and this is only me - it'd be like saying 'happy birthday' - I'd say "but it's not my birthday". That's how my feeble brain sees it. Hope that doesn't offend you because I think you're great :) Happy Hanukkah Fun :)
  • Yeah. When I'm told "Happy Hanukkah" by my Jewish friends I always say "Merry Christmas". Bit of a joke there I guess but we're happy with it.
  • When people tell you Merry Christmas just say thanks and Happy Hanukkah to you. Then when you say Happy Hanukkah to them they can say thanks and Merry Christmas. Now were all happy:)
  • I think the solution would be to correct them and say "Sorry i am not christian, but merry christmas and happy holidays to you". Then leave it up to them to say happy hanukkah. Then again all this would be solved if everyone just said happy holidays.
  • Some people have to find an issue in everything. I would not be offended. Obviously if you are wishing me a Happy anything at all it is not coming from a bad place so why get all fussy. People will always find a reason to be argumentative and self-rightous. Continue to wish Happy Everything...you are a better person for it.
  • It's because in the US, Jews are less than 3% of the population while Christians PLUS "cultural Christians" are 90% of the population. Consequently, "Merry Christmas" is a generic cultural expression and therefore presumably inclusive while "Happy Hanukkah" is religion specific, and in almost the entire world it's what one says to someone KNOWN to be Jewish. So if you say it to someone who isn't, they figure you think they're Jewish, and they're just clearing up the misunderstanding. But "Merry Christmas" is the cultural norm -- and means nothing more than have a really enjoyable and happy Christmas season" -- and so can be said to anyone of any religion or no religion at all. (And FYI, "Be MERRY" essentially and originally meant "consume a lot of alcohol in celebration and have fun doing it!") If you were in Israel, I presume it would be the other way around. But then, I live in Thailand and the Thai Buddhists and Moslems are all out Christmas shopping, singing Christmas Carols, and wishing everybody a Merry Christmas! The Chinese merchants are even hanging Christmas stockings by their ancestor shrines which this time of year double as Creches (Nativity scenes). We even had a Christmas Nativity Play at school today - organized by our gay, British, kindergarten teacher, and he's an Anthroposophist! Yet he lovingly and proudly orchestrated the whole thing and led the "choir of angels" (with a feather duster as baton!) singing Silent Night, Away in the Manger, Hark the Herald Angels Sing, O' Little Town of Bethlehem, We Three Kings, and Joy to the World! The fact is, for weal or for woe (and even more to the chagrin of orthodox Christians than secularists) Christmas has become a secular holiday almost the whole world over, just as the Gregorian calendar is used the whole world over. Hanukkah, by contrast, is an exclusively Jewish national celebration. (But if you said "Happy Hanukkah" to me, and I knew you knew I wasn't Jewish, I'd just say "Thanks. You too.")
  • You know, I don't know how I would respond to that simply because in my whole life no one has ever said "Happy Hanukkah" to me. I would probably say "Thank you. Same to you", but I'm really not sure. They should have responded that way, but it would probably be more in the spirit of the holiday season to be charitable and to assume that they were caught off guard and didn't respond appropriately for that reason Happy Hanukkah
  • maybe because my friend celebrates both
  • Happy Hanukkah! I think people should just respond :o)
  • I would have said and Merry Christmas to you too!! I wouldn't have told you I am not jewish,I think that is rude but then again not everyone is as nice as me:))
  • i dont think its that big of a deal i prolly would have said thanks you too. it couldnt have hurt. :)
  • Once I said "Merry Christmas" and they responded with Happy Hanukkah. to each their own.
  • Yes, they should have accepted your good wishes with grace. A kind thought should never be tossed back like an insult; it should be cherished and seen for what it is: consideration.
  • If you tell anybody "Happy Kwanzaa" they'll just look at you funny.
  • I would have said thank you. I can't say what others should have done.
  • If they'd had manners they would have just said said "Thank you" Sheesh!
  • Not everybody celebrates hanukkah. But EVERYBODY celebrates christmas, even some jews. It's more of the season than the actual holiday.
  • Yes they should have. Respect is important despite what religion you are.
  • A very good and interesting point. I don't celebrate x-mas, however, when people tell me "merry chrismas"! I always respond: "Likewise"!
  • I think that the people you talked to are snobs. I would do the same thing as you if someone said Happy Hanukkah to me. I would say thank you! I know it's the thought that counts. Next time, though try using the phrase "Happy Holidays" instead. It relates to everyone.
  • That's the way I handle it, to just say "Thank you." It's polite, and too much of a hassle otherwise.

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